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Australia Probes if Facebook Data Leaks Broke Privacy Law

U.S. News

Australian authorities say they are investigating whether Facebook breached the country's privacy law when personal information of more than 300,000 Australian users was obtained by Cambridge Analytica, a Trump-linked political consulting firm, without their authorization.


New iPhone brings face recognition (and fears) to masses

Daily Mail

Apple will let you unlock the iPhone X with your face - a move likely to bring facial recognition to the masses. But along with the roll out of the technology, are concerns over how it could be used. Despite Apple's safeguards, privacy activists fear the widespread use of facial recognition would'normalise' the technology. This could open the door to broader use by law enforcement, marketers or others of a largely unregulated tool, creating a'surveillance technology that is abused'. Facial recognition could open the door to broader use by law enforcement, marketers or others of a largely unregulated tool, creating a'surveillance technology that is abused', experts have warned.


Tech companies automate autocratic media in China around the world

#artificialintelligence

Nick Monaco is a research associate at Alphabet's human rights focused think-tank and technology incubator Jigsaw. He is also a research associate on the Computational Propaganda Project at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. Samuel Woolley is the Director of Research of the Computational Propaganda Project at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. A troubling trend is sweeping Silicon Valley--big tech acquiescing to digital authoritarianism to gain access to the Chinese market. In July, Apple removed VPNs from its Chinese app store and announced plans to build a data center in Guizhou to comply with China's new draconian cybersecurity laws.


Pew Research Center: Internet, Science and Tech on the Future of Free Speech

#artificialintelligence

The more hopeful among these respondents cited a series of changes they expect in the next decade that could improve the tone of online life. They believe: Technical and human solutions will arise as the online world splinters into segmented, controlled social zones with the help of artificial intelligence (AI). While many of these experts were unanimous in expressing a level of concern about online discourse today many did express an expectation for improvement. These respondents said it is likely the coming decade will see a widespread move to more-secure services, applications, and platforms, reputation systems and more-robust user-identification policies. They predict more online platforms will require clear identification of participants; some expect that online reputation systems will be widely used in the future. Some expect that online social forums will splinter into segmented spaces, some highly protected and monitored while others retain much of the free-for-all character of today's platforms. Many said they expect that due to advances in AI, "intelligent agents" or bots will begin to more thoroughly scour forums for toxic commentary in addition to helping users locate and contribute to civil discussions. Jim Hendler, professor of computer science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, wrote, "Technologies will evolve/adapt to allow users more control and avoidance of trolling.


Nowhere to hide

BBC News

Helen of Troy may have had a "face that launch'd a thousand ships", according to Christopher Marlowe, but these days her visage could launch a lot more besides. She could open her bank account with it, authorise online payments, pass through airport security, or raise alarm bells as a potential troublemaker when entering a city (Troy perhaps?). This is because facial recognition technology has evolved at breakneck speed, with consequences that could be benign or altogether more sinister, depending on your point of view. High-definition cameras combined with clever software capable of measuring the scores of "nodal points" on our faces - the distance between the eyes, the length and width of the nose, for example - are now being combined with machine learning that makes the most of ever-enlarging image databases. Applications of the tech are popping up all round the world.