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Alphabet's Project Shield And Eliminating DDOS Attacks On Free Speech

Forbes

Most of the world's Internet-connected netizens know of Google through its wildly popular consumer-facing products like its search engine and YouTube video hosting platform. Yet, Google's parent company Alphabet also operates a fascinating "think/do tank" called Jigsaw (formerly Google Ideas) that asks "How can technology make the world safer?" Jigsaw is involved in an incredible array of projects from fighting hate speech with deep learning to making the world's constitutions searchable (a project I personally was heavily involved in, building the technology infrastructure that was used to acquire, digitize, version and codify thousands of constitutions and amendments dating back more than 200 years). Yet, one project of particular interest in today's world of botnet-enabled mass DDOS attacks on free speech and the evolution of cyberwarfare is Jigsaw's Project Shield, which offers free DDOS protection for news, human rights and elections monitoring websites, powered by Google's own global infrastructure. To most of us, distributed denial of service (DDOS) attacks are something we read about in the news periodically when one of our favorite websites goes down.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

#artificialintelligence

By keeping ISPs and websites under threat of closure, the government is able to leverage that additional labor force to help monitor a larger population than it would otherwise be able to. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers that enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, professor of law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. "Context is crucial to many free-speech questions like whether a threat amounts to a true threat and whether a person is a limited-purpose public figure," professor Keats Citron told Engadget.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

#artificialintelligence

According to a 2016 report from internet liberty watchdog, Freedom House, two-thirds of all internet users reside in countries where criticism of the ruling administration is censored -- 27 percent of them live in nations where posting, sharing or supporting unpopular opinions on social media can get you arrested. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers which enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. "Context is crucial to many free speech questions like whether a threat amounts to a true threat and whether a person is a limited purpose public figure," Professor Keats Citron told Engadget.


Inside Google's Internet Justice League and Its AI-Powered War on Trolls

WIRED

Now a small subsidiary of Google named Jigsaw is about to release an entirely new type of response: a set of tools called Conversation AI. Jigsaw is applying artificial intelligence to solve the very human problem of making people be nicer on the Internet. If it can find a path through that free-speech paradox, Jigsaw will have pulled off an unlikely coup: applying artificial intelligence to solve the very human problem of making people be nicer on the Internet. "Jigsaw recruits will hear stories about people being tortured for their passwords or of state-sponsored cyberbullying."