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Tech's Pioneers Have Been Left Behind. Their Stocks Are Cheap--and Complicated.

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Cisco Systems (ticker: CSCO), IBM (IBM), Intel (INTC), Oracle (ORCL), Seagate Technology (STX), Western Digital (WDC), Xerox Holdings (XRX), HP Inc. (HPQ), and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) still employ a total of 900,000 people. They account for $363 billion in annual revenue and $840 billion in stock market value. But their sales, accounting for inflation, are mostly going in reverse. The best of the bunch, Western Digital, is forecast to grow 4.4% next year. Xerox, the worst, is likely to see a 4.7% decline. Wall Street bankers have begun to mount a rescue effort.


Google signs healthcare data and cloud computing deal with Ascension

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REUTERS: Alphabet Inc's Google signed its biggest cloud computing customer in healthcare yet, according to an announcement on Monday (Nov 11), gaining with the deal datasets that could help it tune potentially lucrative artificial intelligence tools. The Wall Street Journal earlier reported Google teaming up with Ascension to collect personal health-related information of millions of Americans across 21 states. The partnership will also explore artificial intelligence and machine learning applications to help improve clinical effectiveness as well as patient safety, Ascension said in a statement. Google Cloud Chief Executive Officer Thomas Kurian has made it a priority in his first year on the job to aggressively chase business from leaders in six industries, including healthcare. The company previously had touted smaller healthcare clients, such as the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine.


Google signs healthcare data and cloud computing deal with Ascension - Reuters

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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Alphabet Inc's (GOOGL.O) Google has signed its biggest cloud computing customer in healthcare to date, in a deal giving it access to datasets that could help it tune potentially lucrative artificial intelligence (AI) tools. Google and Ascension, which operates 150 hospitals and more than 50 senior living facilities across the United States, said the healthcare provider would move some data and analytics tools in its facilities to Google's servers. The deal was mentioned in Google's July earnings call, but drew scrutiny on Monday after the Wall Street Journal reported on.wsj.com/2q3WCer that Google would gain personal health-related information of millions of Americans across 21 states. The Journal reported that the data involved in the project includes lab results, doctor diagnoses and hospitalization records, among other categories, and amounts to a complete health history, along with patient names and dates of birth. Google said in a blog post on Monday that patient data "cannot and will not be combined with any Google consumer data."


IBM sees cognitive solutions, tech services and cloud platform revenue declines

ZDNet

IBM's third quarter revenue missed expectations as its cognitive solutions and technology services and cloud platforms units saw declines from a year ago. Big Blue reported earnings of $2.94 a share on revenue of $18.8 billion, down 2 percent from a year ago. Non-GAAP earnings were $3.42 a share. Wall Street was expecting IBM to report third quarter earnings of $3.40 a share on revenue of $19.1 billion. IBM has been heavily focused on growing artificial intelligence as a business.


Spotlight on AI at Google Cloud Next '18 – SyncedReview – Medium

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Artificial intelligence has become a sort of secret weapon in the battle to build the best cloud service platform. Google Cloud Platform is currently the underdog, trailing both Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure. But Google is betting robust AI will give it the edge it needs to catch up. At the annual Google Cloud Next conference which kicked off July 24 in San Francisco the company unveiled a series of AI-based product releases and enhancements for its analytics and machine learning tools, additional applications on G Suite, and new IoT products. Earlier this week, Google parent company Alphabet reported its Q2 earnings, which were ahead of Wall Street's expectations.


Teradata's bet on subscriptions is paying off

ZDNet

At the opening keynote of the company's annual industry analyst summit, COO Oliver Ratzeberger displayed a chart showing share prices up almost 40% over the past year, and or almost double over that of a couple years ago. Wall Street likes the fact that Teradata's subscription business is ramping up much faster than expected, accounting for over 60% in Q1 vs. the 40 - 50% that was expected. Mind you, Teradata is pulling off this transition while remaining publicly-traded, unlike midsized software counterparts like Tibco and Informatica that felt the need to go private. Beneath the surface, Teradata has made a number of changes to its business that have facilitated the transition to subscription. Many of those pieces were announced last year.


Qlik hits reset button, rolls out new cloud, AI, and developer capabilities

ZDNet

When you see these words in front of a local business, you take note, and it makes you wonder: What has really changed? Keynoting at the April 24 to April 26 Qlik Qonnections event in Orlando, Qlik's new CEO, Mike Capone, after just four months on the job, cut right to the chase and spelled out some important business changes made early in his tenure. Explaining a reorganization that took place in January, Capone said the goal was to refocus Qlik sales and support efforts on large enterprise customers while "getting out of the way" of channel partners catering to midsize and smaller commercial customers. The reorg brought a fresh round of layoffs (on top of the layoffs carried out in 2016 when private equity firm Thoma Bravo took Qlik private). Downsizing seldom looks good (except to Wall Street), but in a message to partners, Capone noted that Qlik is reinvesting savings from the reorg to boost partner support programs, including qualified lead generation.


Oracle tops Q1 estimates

ZDNet

Oracle released first quarter financial results Thursday after the bell. The Redwood Shores, Calif.-based company reported a net income of $2.2 billion, or 52 cents per share. Android or iOS is one of the biggest decisions you'll make for your company, especially regarding security. Non-GAAP earnings were 62 cents per share on a revenue of $9.2 billion, up 7 percent from the year prior. Wall Street was expecting Oracle to report first quarter earnings of 60 cents a share on revenue of $9.03 billion.


Amazon Strategy Teardown: Building New Business Pillars In AI, Next-Gen Logistics, And Enterprise Cloud Apps

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Amazon is the exception to nearly every rule in business. Rising from humble beginnings as a Seattle-based internet bookstore, Amazon has grown into a propulsive force in at least five different giant industries: retail, logistics, consumer technology, cloud computing, and most recently, media and entertainment. The company has had its share of missteps -- the expensive Fire phone flop comes to mind -- but is also rightly known for strokes of strategic genius that have put it ahead of competitors in promising new industries. This was the case with the launch of cloud business AWS in the mid-2000s, and more recently the surprising consumer hit in the Echo device and its Alexa AI assistant. Today's Amazon is far more than just an "everything store," it's a leader in consumer-facing AI and enterprise cloud services. And its insatiable appetite for new markets mean competitors must always be on guard against its next moves. As the biggest online retailer in America, the company accounts for 5% of all retail spending in America, and the company has been publicly traded for two decades. While its market capitalization has swelled recently, so too have expectations. Wall Street banks like Morgan Stanley expect Amazon to continue growing at a rate that no company its size has ever done before: 16% average compound growth in sales through 2025. If Amazon were able to satisfy the lofty goals, it would be "the most aggressive expansion of a giant company in the history of modern business." Understanding the many-headed beast that is Amazon is no easy feat, especially because Amazon is far less transparent than its peers. As the Times has written, "It isn't just secretive, the way Apple is, but in a deeper sense, Jeff Bezos' e-commerce and cloud-storage giant is opaque. Amazon rarely explains either its near-term tactical aims or its long-term strategic vision. By all accounts, Amazon is just getting started in newer initiatives like cloud services, artificial intelligence, and logistics. Given Amazon's enormous breadth, we won't be covering every aspect of its business. Jeff Bezos, the company's founder and long-time CEO, first hatched the idea for Amazon while working on Wall Street at the hedge fund and tech private equity group D. E. Shaw & Co. For a while, it was bootstrapped as an internet bookstore with Bezos' money along with contributions from friends and family. In 1995, Bezos raised nearly $1M in small checks from 20 local angels with a typical check size between $30k and $50k. Among those angels, Nick Hanauer, Eric Dillon, and Tom Alberg (of Madrona Venture Group) were brought on as company advisors.


Tableau announces 'smart' features, but will it be enough to fend off the competition?

ZDNet

Tableau Software just replaced its CEO after a few rocky quarters on Wall Street, but that didn't seem to faze the enthusiastic crowd of 13,000-plus customers gathered at last week's Tableau Conference in Austin, Texas. Customers shared their love for the software, whooping and clapping about cool new features demoed during the popular "Devs on Stage" keynote. Why the change in leadership given customer satisfaction levels and continued double-digit growth? Hover-over insights, shown inset in blue, will bring instant analysis to Tableau that goes beyond showing the details when you mouse over a data point. Tableau broke its coming attractions into five categories: Visual Analytics, Data Engine, Data Management, Cloud and Collaboration.