Well File:

Face Recognition


AI Inventing Its Own Culture, Passing It On to Humans, Sociologists Find - VICE

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We already know that algorithms can and do significantly affect humans. They're not only used to control workers and citizens in physical workplaces, but also control workers on digital platforms and influence the behavior of individuals who use them. Even studies of algorithms have previewed the worrying ease with which these systems can be used to dabble in phrenology and physiognomy. A federal review of facial recognition algorithms in 2019 found that they were rife with racial biases. One 2020 Nature paper used machine learning to track historical changes in how "trustworthiness" has been depicted in portraits, but created diagrams indistinguishable from well-known phrenology booklets and offered universal conclusions from a dataset limited to European portraits of wealthy subjects.


Clearview AI ordered to delete personal data of UK residents

AIHub

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) in the UK has fined facial recognition database company Clearview AI Inc more than £7.5m for using images of people that were scraped from websites and social media. Clearview AI collected the data to create a global online database, with one of the resulting applications being facial recognition. Clearview AI have also been ordered to delete personal data they hold on UK residents, and to stop obtaining and using the personal data that is publicly available on the internet. The ICO is the UK's independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest. This action follows an investigation that they carried out in conjunction with the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC).


Clearview AI fined in UK for Illegally storing Images

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The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) of the UK fined United States-based facial recognition firm Clearview AI £7.5 million for illegally storing images. The much controversial company has been facing such issues for some time, and this new development is yet another hit for Clearview AI. This fine has been imposed on the company for its practice of collecting and storing images of citizens from social media platforms without their consent, which is a severe threat to privacy according to several countries. Moreover, the ICO has also ordered the US firm to remove UK citizens' data from its systems. According to the ICO, Clearview AI has stored more than 20 billion pictures of people in its database.


UK fines Clearview AI £7.5M for scraping citizens' data

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Clearview AI has been fined £7.5 million by the UK's privacy watchdog for scraping the online data of citizens without their explicit consent. The controversial facial recognition provider has scraped billions of images of people across the web for its system. Understandably, it caught the attention of regulators and rights groups from around the world. In November 2021, the UK's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) imposed a potential fine of just over £17 million on Clearview AI. Today's announcement suggests Clearview AI got off relatively lightly.


UK privacy watchdog fines Clearview AI £7.5m and orders UK data to be deleted

ZDNet

Since completing a degree in journalism, Aimee has had her fair share of covering various topics, including business, retail, manufacturing, and travel. She continues to expand her repertoire as a tech journalist with ZDNet. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has fined controversial facial recognition company Clearview AI £7.5 million ($9.4 million) for breaching UK data protection laws and has issued an enforcement notice ordering the company to stop obtaining and using data of UK residents, and to delete the data from its systems. In its finding, the ICO detailed how Clearview AI failed to inform people in the UK that it was collecting their images from the web and social media to create a global online database that could be used for facial recognition; failed to have a lawful reason for collecting people's information; failed to have a process in place to stop the data being retained indefinitely; and failed to meet data protection standards required for biometric data under the General Data Protection Regulation. The ICO also found the company asked for additional personal information, including photos, when asked by members of the public if they were on their database.


UK fines Clearview just under $10M for privacy breaches – TechCrunch

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The UK's data protection watchdog has confirmed a penalty for the controversial facial recognition company, Clearview AI -- announcing a fine of just over £7.5 million today for a string of breaches of local privacy laws. The watchdog has also issued an enforcement notice, ordering Clearview to stop obtaining and using the personal data of UK residents that is publicly available on the internet; and telling it to delete the information of UK residents from its systems. The US company has amassed a database of 20 billion facial images by scraping data off the public internet, such as from social media services, to create an online database that it uses to power an AI-based identity-matching service which it sells to entities such as law enforcement. The problem is Clearview has never asked individuals whether it can use their selfies for that. And in many countries it has been found in breach of privacy laws.


Emotion recognition AI finding fans among lawyers swaying juries and potential clients

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The American Bar Association has taken greater notice of emotional AI as a tool for honing courtroom and marketing performance. It is not clear if the storied group has caught up with the controversy that follows the comparatively new field. On the association's May 18 Legal Rebels podcast, ABA Journal legal affairs writer Victor Li speaks with the CEO of software startup EmotionTrac (a subsidiary of mobile ad tech firm Jinglz) about how an app first designed for the advertising industry reportedly has been adopted by dozens of attorneys. Aaron Itzkowitz is at pains to make clear the difference between facial recognition and affect recognition. At the moment, the use of face biometrics by governments is a growing controversy, and Li would like to stay separate from that debate.


UK watchdog fines facial recognition firm £7.5m over image collection

The Guardian

The UK's data watchdog has fined a facial recognition company £7.5m for collecting images of people from social media platforms and the web to add to a global database. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) also ordered US-based Clearview AI to delete the data of UK residents from its systems. Clearview AI has collected more than 20bn images of people's faces from Facebook, other social media companies and from scouring the web. John Edwards, the UK information commissioner, said Clearview's business model was unacceptable. "Clearview AI Inc has collected multiple images of people all over the world, including in the UK, from a variety of websites and social media platforms, creating a database with more than 20bn images," he said. "The company not only enables identification of those people, but effectively monitors their behaviour and offers it as a commercial service.


Deepfake attacks can easily trick facial recognition

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In brief Miscreants can easily steal someone else's identity by tricking live facial recognition software using deepfakes, according to a new report. Sensity AI, a startup focused on tackling identity fraud, carried out a series of pretend attacks. Engineers scanned the image of someone from an ID card, and mapped their likeness onto another person's face. Sensity then tested whether they could breach live facial recognition systems by tricking them into believing the pretend attacker is a real user. So-called "liveness tests" try to authenticate identities in real-time, relying on images or video streams from cameras like face recognition used to unlock mobile phones, for example.


How to Detect Emotions in Images using Python

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One of the easiest, and yet also the most effective, ways of analyzing how people feel is looking at their facial expressions. Most of the time, our face best describes how we feel in a particular moment. This means that emotion recognition is a simple multiclass classification problem. We need to analyze a person's face and put it in a particular class, where each class represents a particular emotion. In Python, we can use the DeepFace and FER libraries to detect emotions in images.