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em Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles /em Is Unexpectedly Cathartic Pandemic Viewing

Slate

Despite being a childless, science-fiction-loving grad student with nothing but time on my hands back in 2008, I somehow missed Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles when it was on TV. Created by Josh Friedman, The Sarah Connor Chronicles was canceled after two seasons and 31 episodes, despite mostly-positive critical reception. Binging it under pandemic conditions, as I have been recently, has been unexpectedly cathartic. This is a show about people living in a sunny, beautiful, Southern Californian present day while haunted by the knowledge that a grim future might be coming, unless they change it by their actions. It's also about parenting under stress and feeling constantly under siege by inescapable circumstance, which--well, if that's too real, you can always focus on the nifty killer cyborgs instead.


'Ghost in the Shell' (the good one) arrives in 4K on September 8th

Engadget

Just in time for its 25th anniversary, Ghost in the Shell is getting a 4K Ultra HD rerelease. On September 8th, you'll be able to buy Mamoru Oshii's landmark film in a beautiful collection that will let you watch the 1995 feature across multiple formats. Lionsgate has remastered both the original Japanese and English audio tracks for Dolby Atmos. Included in the release is a digital copy of the movie. For good measure, you also get the film on Blu-ray.


Coronavirus: Airport testing and a royal lockdown

BBC News

Here are five things you need to know about the coronavirus outbreak this Wednesday evening. We'll have another update for you tomorrow morning. We've heard from Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden, who's said testing is not a "silver bullet" to stop the need for quarantine for people returning from Spain. Heathrow boss John Holland-Kaye wants tests at airports, and again a few days later, as an alternative. While Conservative MP Crispin Blunt thinks a more targeted use of quarantine measures would get more public support than a blanket rule for the whole of Spain.


AI: The Folklore of Artificial Intelligence - #FolkloreThursday

#artificialintelligence

Myths, as most readers will know, are stories that explain natural occurrences and express beliefs of right and wrong, while legends are, in the context of this article, popular myths of more recent origin. Myths and legends apply as much to contemporary science as to ancient historical phenomenon. The myths and legends of AI, which examined in this article, will illustrate exemplify that statement. Artificial Intelligence ("AI") is the engineering science of making intelligent machines and software imitate human behaviour and intelligence. The alleged impact of AI has focussed on the behaviour of humans in a world where AI moves centre stage in discharging roles and tasks, which humans have performed historically. Popular publications are the source of many myths and legends which have grown-up around AI Novels from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, through Samuel Butler's Erewhon to the novel of Brian Aldiss all feature creations which might replace the human being as the dominant specie.


GPT-3 Creative Fiction

#artificialintelligence

What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.


Mike Pompeo urges more assertive approach to 'Frankenstein' China in major speech

The Japan Times

Washington – U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo took fresh aim at China on Thursday and said Washington and its allies must use "more creative and assertive ways" to press the Chinese Communist Party to change its ways, calling it the "mission of our time." Speaking at the Nixon Library in former President Richard Nixon's birthplace in Yorba Linda, California, Pompeo said the late U.S. leader's worry about what he had done by opening the world to China's Communist Party in the 1970s had been prophetic. "President Nixon once said he feared he had created a'Frankenstein' by opening the world to the CCP," Pompeo said. Nixon, who died in 1994 and was president from 1969 to 1974 opened the way for the establishment of U.S. diplomatic relations with Communist China in 1979 through a series of contacts, including a visit to Beijing in 1972. In a major speech delivered after Washington's surprise order this week for China to close its Houston consulate, Pompeo repeated frequently leveled U.S. charges about Beijing's unfair trade practices, human rights abuses and efforts to infiltrate American society.


How 4 Companies Are Using AI To Solve Waste Issues On Earth And In Space

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is a tool used by people all over the world to empower humans to make informed decisions. With a responsible use of AI, humans are able to solve problems faster because artificial intelligence can process more information at a time than a human can. As climate change, sustainability, and corporate social responsibility become of increased importance for brands across the globe, business, and communications professionals should keep an eye on how emerging technologies, like AI, are being used to solve real-world problems. Some of the problems AI is solving today are right out of science fiction movies. Waste recognition, space junk, and sustainability are a few of the challenges that artificial intelligence is helping humanity tackle.


How 4 Companies Are Using AI To Solve Waste Issues On Earth & In Space

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is a tool used by people all over the world to empower humans to make informed decisions. With a responsible use of AI, humans are able to solve problems faster because artificial intelligence can process more information at a time than a human can. As climate change, sustainability, and corporate social responsibility become of increased importance for brands across the globe, business, and communications professionals should keep an eye on how emerging technologies, like AI, are being used to solve real-world problems. Some of the problems AI is solving today are right out of science fiction movies. Waste recognition, space junk, and sustainability are a few of the challenges that artificial intelligence is helping humanity tackle.


Brave New World is looking pretty good, all things considered

ZDNet

In 1932, British novelist Aldous Huxley published Brave New World, considered by many to be the seminal work of modern dystopian science fiction in the English language. Along with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and then, later, George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, these nightmarish masterpieces have given society pause on the dangers of technological progress throughout the decades and have become part of many high school and college literary reading lists. At the time of Brave New World's publication, the world was still recovering from the horrors of the 1918 pandemic and World War I, each claiming millions of lives. Society had entered an age of mass industrialization, pioneered by Henry Ford's assembly line. These developments, along with the emergence of the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin's dictatorship, created a perfect backdrop for Huxley to create his dystopian future, one of a single world state, with no privacy, no individuality, no families, and no self-determination.


Ingraham tells voters to 'learn to spot lies' from Democrats, prevent 'Orwellian chasm' of Biden presidency

FOX News

With the rise of the hard left in America, we should keep George Orwell's warning in mind and learn to spot lies that are made to sound truthful. Laura Ingraham opened Thursday's show with a monologue meant to help viewers "decode" the language used by Democrats to assuage voters who might otherwise be skeptical or fearful of a Joe Biden presidency. The "Ingraham Angle" host began by quoting George Orwell's classic 1946 essay, "Politics and the English Language," in which he wrote that "political language ... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." "At the time, George Orwell was writing about the rise of communism and far-left thought," Ingraham said. "Today with the rise of the hard left in America, we should keep Orwell's warnings in mind and learn to spot lies that are made to sound truthful during this pivotal time," she said.