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5G & The Future Of Connectivity

#artificialintelligence

The next generation of wireless technology could affect a wide range of industries, from healthcare to financial services to retail. The technology enables faster data transfer speeds -- up to 10x faster than the speeds achievable with older standards -- lower latency, and greater network capacity. As a result, 5G creates a tremendous opportunity for numerous industries, but also sets the stage for large-scale disruption. Download the free report to understand what 5G is, the industries it's disrupting, and the drivers paving the way for its implementation. As of June 2021, commercial 5G services have already been deployed across more than 1,500 cities in 60 countries worldwide, according to Viavi Solutions. The number of IoT devices -- which will rely on 5G to transmit vast amounts of data in real time -- is projected to grow from 12B in 2020 to 30B in 2025, per IoT Analytics, more than 4 devices for every person on Earth. Executives across industries are already jostling to take advantage of 5G tech -- and avoid being disrupted by it. Earnings call mentions of 5G have soared in recent years. From enabling remote robotic surgery and autonomous cars to improving crop management, 5G is poised to transform many of the world's biggest industries. The impact of 5G on manufacturing could be huge. It's estimated that improved connectivity through 5G will create $13T in global economic value across industries by 2035, according to IHS Markit. A third of that total is projected to come from the manufacturing sector alone. This would enable manufacturers to build "smart factories" that rely on automation, augmented reality, and IoT. And with 5G powering large amounts of IoT devices and sensors around the factory, artificial intelligence can be integrated more deeply with operations. On fast-paced assembly lines, even microseconds of latency can cause costly disruptions for the manufacturer.


The Future of Enterprise Billing

#artificialintelligence

The connectivity benefits of 5G are expected to make businesses more competitive and give consumers access to more information faster than ever before. Connected cars, smart communities, industrial IoT, healthcare, immersive education--they all will rely on unprecedented opportunities that 5G technology will create. The enterprise market opportunity is driving many telecoms operators' strategies for, and investments in, 5G. Companies are accelerating investment in core and emerging technologies such as cloud, internet of things, robotic process automation, artificial intelligence and machine learning. IoT (Internet of Things), as an example, improving connectivity and data sharing between devices, enabling biometric based transactions; with blockchain, enabling use cases, trade transactions, remittances, payments and investments; and with deep learning and artificial intelligence, utilization of advanced algorithms for high personalization.


The Industrial Internet of Things: A guide to deployments, vendors and platforms

ZDNet

Technologies such as 5G, IoT sensors and platforms, edge computing, AI and analytics, robotics, blockchain, additive manufacturing and virtual/augmented reality are coalescing into a fertile environment for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), which is set to usher in what's often described as the Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0. Here's how analyst firm IoT Analytics sees the relationship between the broader IoT and the IIoT/Industry 4.0 sector: This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, explores how infrastructure around the world is being linked together via sensors, machine learning and analytics. In this brave new world, supply chains will have end-to-end transparency thanks to sensors, data networks and analytics capabilities at key points. All other things (trade barriers, for example) being equal, parts and raw materials will arrive just in time at highly automated factories, and the fate of the resulting products will be tracked throughout their lifetimes to eventual recycling. Similarly, 'smart farms' will combine emerging IIoT-related technologies into integrated high-resolution crop production systems based on robotics, big data and analytics.