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Could 2021 be the year for technology? Here are some trends to watch out for

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The icing on the cake is that the action takes place in the PUBG universe. Some of the most exciting inventions in TV will be in 2021. LG has hinted at ditching the E-Series OLED and bringing in Gallery Series. On the other hand, Samsung might unveil a rotating Sero TV. This year will be bigger and mightier with TV screens measuring above 75-inch becoming mainstream.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

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The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


An origami robot for touching virtual reality objects

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A group of EPFL researchers have developed a foldable device that can fit in a pocket and can transmit touch stimuli when used in a human-machine interface. When browsing an e-commerce site on your smartphone, or a music streaming service on your laptop, you can see pictures and hear sound snippets of what you are going to buy. But sometimes it would be great to touch it too – for example to feel the texture of a garment, or the stiffness of a material. The problem is that there are no miniaturized devices that can render touch sensations the way screens and loudspeakers render sight and sound, and that can easily be coupled to a computer or a mobile device. Researchers in Professor Jamie Paik's lab at EPFL have made a step towards creating just that – a foldable device that can fit in a pocket and can transmit touch stimuli when used in a human-machine interface.


Emerging technology can replace workers -- or train them for new work

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In 2012, venture capitalist and entrepreneur Marc Andreesen predicted that jobs will be divided between "people who tell computers what to do, and people who are told by computers what to do." Already, smartphones and other internet-connected devices assign work in a wide variety of environments, from Amazon warehouses to city streets. Workers that take assignments from computers may see their jobs completely automated as artificial intelligence and robots become more capable over time. However, these same devices also have the potential to train workers in new skills and ride out successive waves of automation. Skills training typically comes through higher education or from companies themselves.


5G will change your business faster than you think

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Not that I'm a big fan of such titles, but when I look at what 5G will bring, it's clear most businesses will feel the impact. Most technologies have a slow adoption curve. This change of speed is going to catch most companies unaware. The technological improvements of better connectivity are apparent, but their consequences aren't. There are two big groups of problems that 5G's lower latency and high bandwidth will impact. On one side, we have those problems that we can solve with low computation and real-time responses. Think of any remote controller. There is minor computation needs on the controller side but needs fast reactions on the remoter actuator.