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9 Applications of AI You May Not Know

#artificialintelligence

The very mention of Artificial Intelligence reminds most people of movies like the Terminator but in actuality, AI is already very present in our daily lives making things much easier for us in a multitude of fields. For example, according to a Harvard Business Review study, companies that were using AI for sales managed to bring in 50% more leads and reduce their costs by 40%-60%. AI applications are not necessarily actual robots walking about the office. In most cases, it means the introduction of software and tools that make conducting business easier, more affordable, and faster by automating as much as possible. Mathematician Alan Turing was the first to really ask the question'Can machines think?'.


Standing Ai (Artificial intelligence) - A brief history - Diginixai

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Thirty years ago, everybody was thinking about flying cars. Do we have flying cars now?? of course not! But we have something better. AI, wheel of our times, it will change the world as the invention of wheel did in the stone age. The term'artificial intelligence' was given by John Mccarthy way back in the 50's, but the journey of understanding the process took more than half of a century.


[REPORT PREVIEW] The Age of AI

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But the idea of AI -- of machines that can sense, classify, learn, reason, predict, and interact -- has been around for decades. Today, the combination of massive and available datasets, inexpensive parallel computing, and advances in algorithms has made it possible for machines to function in ways that were previously unthinkable.1 While the more obvious examples such as robotics, driverless cars, and intelligent agents such as Siri and Alexa tend to dominate the news, artificial intelligence has much wider implications. Gartner predicts that "by 2020, algorithms will positively alter the behavior of billions of global workers."2 Markets & Markets expects the AI market to reach $5.05B by 2020.3 This report lays out the current state of AI for business, describes primary and emerging use cases, and states the risks, opportunities, and organizational considerations that businesses are facing. It concludes with recommendations for companies thinking about applying AI to their own organizations and a look at some of the business, legal, and technical trends that are likely to shape the future. Executive Summary 1 What is Artificial Intelligence? 2 Use Cases for Artificial Intelligence 8 Implications and Recommendations 13 A Look at the Future 17 End Notes 19 Methodology 22 Acknowledgements 23 About Us 24 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3. www.altimetergroup.com


Artificial Intelligence an "Alchemy" – techutzpah – Medium

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John McCarthy first coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" (AI) in 1956 at the Dartmouth Conference along with four other founding colleagues -- Marvin Minsky, Oliver Selfridge, Ray Solomonoff, and Trenchard More. The original definition and concept of AI according to John McCarthy is "Every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so preciously described that a machine can be made to simulate it. An attempt will be made t find how to make machines and concepts, solve kinds of problems now reserved for humans, and improve themselves." What it simply means is that AI is a term for "simulated intelligence" in machines. The machines are programmed to mimic the cognitive functions of the human brain.


Artificial Intelligence an "Alchemy" - BlockDelta

#artificialintelligence

John McCarthy first coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" (AI) in 1956 at the Dartmouth Conference along with four other founding colleagues – Marvin Minsky, Oliver Selfridge, Ray Solomonoff, and Trenchard More. The original definition and concept of AI according to John McCarthy is "Every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so preciously described that a machine can be made to simulate it. An attempt will be made to find how to make machines and concepts, solve kinds of problems now reserved for humans, and improve themselves." What it simply means is that AI is a term for "simulated intelligence" in machines. The machines are programmed to mimic the cognitive functions of the human brain.


Artificial Intelligence, Customer Centricity and Banking's Social Contract

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The concepts fueling the development of artificial-intelligence applications are hardly new. Attempts to understand how the brain thinks--how decisions are made, how it saves and processes memories, and how it leverages connected learning systems--have been perplexing humans since before the times of the classic philosophers. Soon after brilliant English mathematician Alan Turing published his groundbreaking 1950 paper "Computing Machinery and Intelligence", the academic discipline aimed toward one day surpassing human intelligence was born. The term artificial intelligence (AI) itself was coined by Boston-born computer scientist John McCarthy in 1956, as he and his peers established research labs at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Stanford. The current wave of AI startups owes much to the decades of research and experimentation developed by these teams and those that followed.


Siri, Who Is Terry Winograd?

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A version of this article appeared in the Spring 2017 issue of strategy business. On the Stanford University campus, you could practically throw a rock and hit 100 graduate students who are building apps that enable people to communicate more effectively. But Terry Winograd is particularly enthusiastic about the app one of his graduate students, Catalin Voss, is working on. Voss, a native of Germany who completed his bachelor's and master's degrees last June at the age of 21, is working on an app that deploys Google Glass, linked to a smartphone, to help autistic children recognize human emotions through facial expressions. Venture capitalists weren't interested, even though Voss had created and sold a startup that used eye-tracking technology to monitor attentiveness to a Toyota subsidiary while still a freshman. But Terry Winograd was interested. "It runs, it has AI [artificial intelligence]," says Winograd, who 20-odd years ago advised another graduate student on the then nascent field of searching the World Wide Web. "It's at a stage where we've actually put 30 devices into homes. Our goal is to have 100 in the trial." Voss says his objective is to build a medical product that insurers will be willing to pay for. "We want to prove the investors wrong, who didn't believe in it, and build an aid for people with autism, and other mental disorders as well," he says. "We believe we've built a fairly holistic system for mental health."


Siri, Who Is Terry Winograd?

#artificialintelligence

On the Stanford University campus, you could practically throw a rock and hit 100 graduate students who are building apps that enable people to communicate more effectively. But Terry Winograd is particularly enthusiastic about the app one of his graduate students, Catalin Voss, is working on. Voss, a native of Germany who completed his bachelor's and master's degrees last June at the age of 21, is working on an app that deploys Google Glass, linked to a smartphone, to help autistic children recognize human emotions through facial expressions. Venture capitalists weren't interested, even though Voss had created and sold a startup that used eye-tracking technology to monitor attentiveness to a Toyota subsidiary while still a freshman. But Terry Winograd was interested. "It runs, it has AI [artificial intelligence]," says Winograd, who 20-odd years ago advised another graduate student on the then nascent field of searching the World Wide Web. "It's at a stage where we've actually put 30 devices into homes. Our goal is to have 100 in the trial." Voss says his objective is to build a medical product that insurers will be willing to pay for. "We want to prove the investors wrong, who didn't believe in it, and build an aid for people with autism, and other mental disorders as well," he says. "We believe we've built a fairly holistic system for mental health." Winograd was Voss's first choice for an advisor even though the 70-year-old professor retired from teaching three years ago.