Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


The reality of AI is less scary than the movies

#artificialintelligence

I was talking to someone at work recently and mentioned the Palm Pilot. He never heard of it. Some of us remember it being released in 1996 before the smartphone and social media, and in the early days of the internet. It drove the creation of the smartphone, though the people at Intel at the time didn't see how a portable, hand-held device like this could become common. One of the founders and inventors was Jeff Hawkins who also founded Handspring and worked on the Treo that evolved into a very early smartphone with a camera, which this brings us to today's topic, artificial intelligence.


Magic Data

#artificialintelligence

I believe that anyone who has seen the movie "Artificial Intelligence" was deeply impressed by the cute-looking, kind and soft-hearted robot, David, who longed for the love of human mother Monica. David was a robot made by a robot company that could love people. He replaced Monica's son Henry, who is terminally ill and falls into a vegetative state. When Henry wakes up, David is faced with the situation of being destroyed. He turns into a real human boy, and seeks to gain the love of his mother, Monica.


Selfhood, Artificial Intelligence, and Robotic People

#artificialintelligence

Is AI finally achieving selfhood? You'll find lots of opinions about this, many of them based on loose, if-it-walks-like-a-duck parallels. Here's my opinion based on 25 years research attempting to explain what selves are and how they emerged within nothing but physical chemistry. The big difference between selves and non-selves is that we exist by persistence. We're fragile, yet we've somehow managed to survive for an uninterrupted 3.8 billion-year run.


7 Things You Need to Know About Marketing Using Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is not a new concept. The term was coined in 1956 by John McCarthy and Marvin Minsky, who defined it as "the science and engineering of making intelligent machines." Since then, AI has made tremendous advances, and we're still seeing even more growth today. Fortune Business Insights projects the global AI market will grow from $387 billion in 2022 to $1.4 billion by 2029. The movie iRobot was set in 2035 and told the story of a future where highly intelligent robots fill public service positions. Unfortunately, the robots in this movie turned out to be a more significant threat to humanity than expected.


Should We Worry About Artificial Intelligence (AI)? - Coding Dojo Blog

#artificialintelligence

Humanity at a Crossroads--Artificial Intelligence is one of the most intriguing topics today, filled with various arguments and views on whether it's a blessing or a threat to humanity. We might be at the crossroads, but what if AI itself is already crossing the line? If we look at "I, Robot," a sci-fi film that takes place in Chicago circa 2035, highly intelligent robots powered by artificial intelligence fill public service positions and have taken over all the menial jobs, including garbage collection, cooking, and even dog walking throughout the world. The movie came out in 2004 starring Will Smith as Detective Del Spooner who eventually discovers a conspiracy in which AI-powered robots may enslave and hurt the human race. Stephen Hawking, famed physicist, also once said: "Success in creating effective AI could be the biggest event in the history of our civilization. So we can't know for sure if we'll be infinitely helped by AI, or ignored by it and side-lined, or conceivably destroyed by it."


Robotics expert Robin Murphy explains why 'Star Wars' robots don't reflect reality

#artificialintelligence

Robotics is a smoking-hot industry that's evolving by literal leaps and bounds, and the top researchers in the field are also some of sci-fi's geekiest fans. Robin Murphy, the Raytheon professor of computer science and engineering at Texas A&M University, specializes in artificial intelligence for robotics. As a component of her curriculum, she writes "Science Fiction, Science Fact," a series of provocative, engaging articles that highlight the myriad differences between the robots and droids depicted in popular science fiction films and the best sci-fi TV shows and actual robots and autonomous machines working in the real world. Although "The Mandalorian" and "The Book of Boba Fett" excel in depicting visually arresting Star Wars droids, their mechanical designs are not only impractical but often no match for real robots, Murphy explained in a column in the journal Science Robotics (opens in new tab). In addition to being one of the finest minds in robotics, she's the distinguished author of several MIT Press books on the topic, including "Robotics Through Science Fiction (opens in new tab)" (2018), "Introduction to AI Robotics (opens in new tab)" (2001, 2018) and "Disaster Robotics (opens in new tab)" (2014).


'Minority Report' at 20: Which Tech Predictions Were Accurate?

#artificialintelligence

Steven Spielberg's 2002 sci-fi thriller "Minority Report," in which Tom Cruise is the captain of a state-of-the-art "Precrime" law enforcement division, is still a touchstone for new tech: Self-driving cars are (kind of) here, but we're still waiting on flying cars, jetpacks and more innovations like the ones Spielberg's futurist think tank dreamed up. Here are some of the tech predictions the movie, which was based on the 1956 short story by legendary sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick, got right and some of the things it failed to foresee about the future.


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

Actor Val Kilmer lost his voice to throat cancer, yet in the new "Top Gun" movie, he does speak a line, thanks to an artificial intelligence program that recreated his voice. That is a good use of audio "deepfakes," computer-generated voices that sound human. Here's a bad use of the evolving tech: Bank robbers faked the voice of a company's director in order to steal $35 million in a 2020 fraud case in the United Arab Emirates. An employee believed they were speaking with the executive on the phone, directing them to transfer funds. But the employee was speaking with a deepfake imitating the director.


See Artificial Intelligence Come To Life In New Documentary

#artificialintelligence

Despite several films proving that the pursuit of artificial intelligence may be at the detriment to humankind, several scientists, theorists and casual observers of all things inventive are keen to see true artificial intelligence grace the world. One such man who has spent much of his life pursuing the advancement of artificial intelligence is programmer David Hanson. Hanson is the man behind Sophia, an artificially intelligent robot that is the centre of a documentary airing in theatres later this fall. Deadline has the scoop on the people behind the documentary, dubbed Sophia and offered fans a first glimpse of what to expect courtesy of a trailer. Sophia, centres on one of the world's most advanced artificial life forms created by programmer David Hanson. The documentary focuses on Hanson and his goal of creating empathetic artificial lifeforms, such as Sophia.


How Robotics In The Entertainment Industry Could Intertwine With Other Sectors For Growth

#artificialintelligence

BARCELONA, SPAIN - MAY 09: The Terminator robot is seen in the paddock following qualifying for the ... [ ] Spanish Formula One Grand Prix at the Circuit de Catalunya on May 9, 2009 in Barcelona, Spain. Robotics has been a growing staple across the entertainment industry for some time now. Whether it's enhancing scenes in film and TV through innovative cameras and angles, or through the rides we see at amusement parks, robotics has been steadily becoming more advanced before our eyes. What are the next steps in this growing sector? One area that has been utilised to great success so far has been using robotic stunt doubles on film and TV sets.