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Robot can fly, swim or hitch a ride by sticking to other objects

New Scientist

A robotic drone that can travel through air and water, and also attach itself to larger objects with a suction cup, could be useful for tagging wild animals, say its creators. The suction cup is inspired by the remora fish, which attaches itself to larger marine creatures in a symbiotic relationship where the remora eats parasites that would irritate its host and also gets a ride in return. "My original thought was'let's find a point where we can beat nature'," says Li Wen at Beihang University in Beijing. "Let's do a robot that can not only swim and stick underwater, but also can fly into the air and stick in the air. I don't think there are any animals that can do this."


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

The mind-blowing technology at the Olympics is always impressive, but it's proving to have more than just the cool factor in Beijing. These innovations are cutting down on human contact to help keep COVID-19 at bay. The Beijing Organizing Committee for the 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games outlined many ways robots have taken over responsibilities normally performed by humans. An anti-epidemic robot stands at the entrance to each competition area. The terminal scans QR codes from phones of those entering the venue for health, vaccination and travel records.


Robots have invaded the 2022 Winter Olympics in the name of epidemic prevention

#artificialintelligence

The mind-blowing technology at the Olympics is always impressive, but it's proving to have more than just the cool factor in Beijing. These innovations are cutting down on human contact to help keep COVID-19 at bay. The 2022 Winter Games have brought new events like the monobob and big air, but other novel concepts are functioning in the Olympic bubble to combat the spread of the coronavirus. The Beijing Organizing Committee for the 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games outlined many ways robots have taken over responsibilities normally performed by humans. An anti-epidemic robot stands at the entrance to each competition area.


AI Start-Ups in China

Communications of the ACM

Chinese AI businesses have been growing rapidly since 2010. They have attracted significant investment from Internet giants and a vast number of emerging AI companies have emerged. Over the past decade, Chinese AI start-ups have gradually moved away from noisy bubbles and landed in an investment boom. In 2020, when people were fighting against the pandemic, CloudMinds, an AI start-up based in Beijing, developed a humanoid service robot named Cloud Ginger XR-1. Ginger played an important role in local hospitals, delivering food and medication to patients in a contactless manner when it was needed the most. Moreover, Ginger entertained patients, freeing up doctors and medical teams to focus on more critical health matters.


AI Is About to Change Everything. Here's What You Need to Know

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Kai-Fu Lee is a Taiwanese computer scientist based in Beijing. After earning his Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon, he worked at Apple and Microsoft before becoming president of Google China, a position he held from 2005 to 2009. Chen Qiufan is a renowned Chinese science fiction writer and the author of the novel The Waste Tide. Listen to the audio version--read by Lee himself--in the Next Big Idea App. As AI and other technologies disrupt the world, we all must familiarize ourselves with the opportunities they pose and the challenges they may create.


COVID-19 pandemic pushes Chinese tech giants to roll out more courier robots

The Japan Times

More than a thousand robots are set to join the delivery personnel ranks of Chinese behemoths Alibaba, Meituan and JD.com over the next year as the pandemic fuels demand for contactless services. The firms expect to operate over 2,000 robots between them by 2022, up about fourfold from now, their executives said, encouraged also by falling costs of making robots. Millions of couriers still deliver packages for as less as 3 yuan ($0.47) in China, but companies have been exploring the use of drones or box-like robots on wheels from as early as 2013 amid a labor crunch that has worsened due to the pandemic. Beijing has also ordered firms to ensure rest periods for couriers as they scramble to meet rising demand and deadlines. "The COVID-19 pandemic has been a big boost" for robot rollout plans, said Xia Huaxia, chief scientist at Meituan.


The latest in humanoid robots: TALOS, Memmo & Humanoids 2020

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Last week we participated in The IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids) as Gold Sponsors. We took part in the workshops'Towards physical-social human-robot interaction,' and'TALOS: Status & Progress', as invited speakers, as well as offering a Virtual Tour of our legged robots including our latest projects, SOLO12 & Kangaroo. The IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots is the internationally recognized prime event of the humanoid robotics community. Established in 2000 and held annually, the Humanoids Conference is a forum for researchers working in the area of humanoid robots including mechatronics, control, perception, planning, learning, human-robot interaction, biomechanics, artificial intelligence, cognition, and neuroscience. Although this year's event took place virtually, PAL Robotics has previously taken part in Humanoids Conferences around the world, including in Toronto, and Beijing in recent years. At the event, we offered a Virtual Tour of all of our legged robots featuring our Humanoids Team: Sai Kishor, Adrià Roig, and Narcis Miguel.


How Toyota thrives when the chips are down

The Japan Times

Beijing – Toyota Motor Corp. may have pioneered the just-in-time manufacturing strategy, but its decision to stockpile the chips that have become key components in cars goes back a decade to the Fukushima disaster. After the catastrophe severed Toyota's supply chains on March 11, 2011, the world's biggest automaker realized the lead-time for semiconductors was far too long to cope with devastating shocks such as natural disasters. The automaker came up with a business continuity plan (BCP) that required suppliers to stockpile anywhere from two to six months' worth of chips, depending on the time it takes from order to delivery, four sources said. That's why Toyota has so far been largely unscathed by a global shortage of semiconductors following a surge in demand for electrical goods under novel coronavirus lockdowns that has forced many rival automakers to suspend production, the sources said. "Toyota was, as far as we can tell, the only automaker properly equipped to deal with chip shortages," said a person familiar with Harman International, which specializes in car audio systems, displays and driver assistance technology.


'Better off thanks to China': German companies double down on resurgent giant

The Japan Times

BERLIN – German industrial robot-maker Hahn Automation plans to invest millions of euros in new factories in China over the next three years, keen to capitalize on an economy that's rebounding more rapidly than others from the COVID-19 crisis. "If we want to grow with the Chinese market, we have to manufacture on the ground," Chief Executive Frank Konrad said of the investment drive, intended to skirt Chinese export hurdles in what Beijing views as a strategic sector. "Our goal is to make up to 25% of our sales in China by 2025," he said, up from roughly 10% now. But while the Chinese recovery may be good news for companies like Hahn, it is complicating efforts by Chancellor Angela Merkel's government to diversify trade relations and become less dependent on Asia's rising superpower. Despite Berlin's concerns, German industry is deepening ties with China, which battled the pandemic with stricter measures than other countries, moved out of a first lockdown earlier and saw demand rebound more quickly. Olaf Kiesewetter, CEO of car sensor supplier UST in Thuringia in eastern Germany, shares the same ambition of making 25% of sales in China.


U.S. may help others buy non-Huawei telecom gear, says Washington official

The Japan Times

Beijing – The United States is willing to help other countries finance purchases of next-generation telecommunications devices from Western providers so they can avoid buying from Chinese technology giant Huawei, a U.S. official said Thursday. Washington is lobbying European and other allies to exclude Huawei Technologies Ltd., which the U.S. sees as a security threat, as they upgrade to 5G networks. Australia, Japan and some others have imposed restrictions on Chinese technology, but Huawei's lower-cost equipment is popular with developing countries and is making inroads into Europe. Giving Huawei even a small 5G role would allow Beijing to expand its "surveillance state" by eavesdropping on phone and other network-based systems, said Keith Krach, a U.S. undersecretary of state for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment. "There's lots of financing tools and those kinds of things that I think many countries like us are willing to help provide, because we recognize this danger," Krach said on a conference call with reporters.