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The ulti-mutt pet? Chinese tech company develops robot dogs that uses AI to 'hear' and 'see'

#artificialintelligence

It's whip fast, obeys commands and doesn't leave unpleasant surprises on the floor – meet the AlphaDog, a robotic response to two of China's burgeoning loves: pets and technology. The high-tech hound uses sensors and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology to'hear' and'see' its environment – and can even be taken for walks. "It's really very similar to a real dog," says Ma Jie, chief technology officer at Weilan, the company behind the product. The Nanjing-based creators say their robot dog – which moves at a speed of almost 15 kilometres (nine miles) per hour and spins on the spot like an excited puppy – is the fastest on the market. With four metal legs it is more stable than a real dog, Ma explains as one of his team swiftly kicks it to prove the point.


Genesis broke a world record for the most drones in the sky

Engadget

Drone shows are quickly becoming the tool of choice for people and companies that want to grab your attention, and Genesis knows that all too well. The Hyundai-owned car brand marked its entrance into China by breaking the Guinness World Record for the most Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the air at the same time, using 3,281 drones to display its logo and otherwise advertise over Shanghai on March 29th. The company flew'just' 3,051 drones in September 2020. That, in turn, smashed a record set by a 2,200-drone performance in Russia just days earlier. Intel, which has a reputation for drone light shows, last claimed the record with 2,066 drones flying over Folsom, California in July 2018.


Robot artist sells art for $688,888, now eyeing music career

Boston Herald

Sophia is a robot of many talents -- she speaks, jokes, sings and even makes art. In March, she caused a stir in the art world when a digital work she created as part of a collaboration was sold at an auction for $688,888 in the form of a non-fungible token, or NFT. The sale highlighted a growing frenzy in the NFT market, where people can buy ownership rights to digital content. NFTs each have a unique digital code saved on blockchain ledgers that allow anyone to verify the authenticity and ownership of items. David Hanson, CEO of Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics and Sophia's creator, has been developing robots for the past two and a half decades.


NFT digital artwork by humanoid robot Sophia up for auction

#artificialintelligence

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Robot artist Sophia, whose first artwork goes up for auction on Wednesday, says she draws inspiration for her work from people and is open to future creative partnerships with humans. A digital artwork by the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics humanoid, in the form of a Non-Fungible Token (NFT), is to be auctioned in the first sale of such pieces created jointly with artificial intelligence (AI). NFTs, a digital signature saved on blockchain ledgers that allows anyone to verify the ownership and authenticity of items, have become the latest investment craze, with one artwork selling this month for nearly $70 million. "I hope the people like my work, and the humans and I can collaborate in new and exciting ways going forward," Sophia said in her studio, speaking in a flat voice. She wore a silver-coloured dress and held a pen. Sophia, who was unveiled in 2016, produced her art in collaboration with 31-year-old Italian digital artist Andrea Bonaceto, known for colourful portraits, some of which depict famous people, such as Tesla's chief executive, Elon Musk.


In pursuit of pragmatic solutions to pervasive problems

MIT Technology Review

The Alibaba Damo Academy is a unique hybrid research and development (R&D) facility. An academically-oriented independent science organization established in 2017 in Hangzhou, China, it is also an arms-length research affiliate of its founder, Chinese internet technology giant Alibaba. Damo's project development pipelines are positioned around developing data-enabled technologies for fundamental business and social challenges, such as alleviating traffic congestion in mega-cities and workforce productivity in logistics. But the approach to solving these foundational problems is purposefully focused on commercialization-centric principles and development, which Damo's leaders believe help shorten their development cycle and improve the efficiency of their scientific research. Damo's approach to R&D is a founding principal linked to an even deeper strategic objective: that the academy must "outlast Alibaba," to become an enduring, sustainable, and independent developer of all of the group's technology innovation.


Tesla Gets A New Chinese EV Competitor In Xiaomi

International Business Times

Tesla's electric car rivals in China are continuing to grow as smartphone maker Xiaomi announced Tuesday that it is jumping into the EV arena. The company said in a regulatory filing that it will invest $10 billion into its electric car business over the next 10 years as it sets up a wholly-owned subsidiary. Its initial investment into the car unit will equal 10 billion yuan, or about $1.52 billion, according to the filing. Xiaomi may invest up to 100 billion yuan into the electric vehicle business over the course of the next three years, taking external financing into account, with 60% contributed by the company and the remaining balance in raised funds, sources told Bloomberg before the company's announcement. At the helm of the smart electric vehicle business will be Xiaomi CEO Lei Jun.


Machines that learn: The origin story of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Lee Sedol, a world champion in the Chinese strategy board game Go, faced a new kind of adversary at a 2016 match in Seoul. Developers at DeepMind, an artificial intelligence startup acquired by Google, had fed 30 million Go moves into a deep neural network. Their creation, dubbed AlphaGo, then figured out which moves worked by playing millions of games against itself, learning at a faster rate than any human ever could. The match, which AlphaGo won 4 to 1, "was the moment when the new movement in artificial intelligence exploded into the public consciousness," technology journalist Cade Metz writes in his engaging new book, "Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World." Metz, who covers AI for The New York Times and previously wrote for Wired magazine, is well positioned to chart the decades-long effort to build artificially intelligent machines.


Chinese scientists develop a laser capable of 'seeing' hidden objects from a mile away

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists in China have developed a laser that can locate a hidden object from a mile away. Researchers hid a mannequin inside an apartment and fired a laser emitter at its location, determining the dummy's location by calculating how long it took photons to hit different parts of the room and travel back to the laser. The technology, known as non-line-of-sight (NLOS) imaging, could be utilized by the military to find enemy targets or rescue teams to find victims. It could also be beneficial in helping self-driving cars detect pedestrians and other vehicles from behind buildings. A team at the University of Science and Technology of China perfected the new technique.


Robot 'humanoid' Sophia has digital art up for sale in the first ever AI auction

#artificialintelligence

Sophia is not just any artist. "She" is a robot whose first artwork goes up for auction on Wednesday. Sophia says she draws inspiration for her work from people and is open to future creative partnerships with humans. A digital artwork by the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics humanoid, in the form of a Non-Fungible Token (NFT), is to be auctioned in the first sale of such pieces created jointly with artificial intelligence (AI). NFTs, a digital signature saved on blockchain ledgers that allows anyone to verify the ownership and authenticity of items, have become the latest investment craze, with one artwork selling this month for nearly $70 million.


TuSimple IPO Filing Shows Self-Driving Trucks Still a Money-Loser

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Self-driving company TuSimple Inc. unveiled paperwork for its initial public offering Tuesday showing it has lost more than $300 million over the past three years in the race to be the first to launch fully autonomous long-haul trucks. TuSimple had already filed confidentially for an IPO, The Wall Street Journal reported, and the Tuesday filing offered the public the first detailed look at a startup that has attracted more funding than many of its Silicon Valley counterparts and maintained split operations in California and China. Its China connections have caught the attention of U.S. regulators. The Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S., or Cfius, has identified TuSimple as a company meriting review because of its ties to China and because autonomous driving technology is considered a critical technology for the Department of Defense. Cfius alerted TuSimple this month that it was probing a Chinese investment in the company from 2017, according to the IPO filing.