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Rebar robotics firm Toggle adds another $3M to its fundraising tally • TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

There's no denying that the robotics startup world has taken a hit during the ongoing economic downturn. Recent numbers prove what we've all suspected for some time. But two things are true: 1) The lull is temporary; and 2) While robotics isn't recession-proof, construction might as well be. This is certainly a theme of late -- as other categories of robotics have struggled to raise, those operating in construction appear relatively unimpacted. New York-based Toggle this morning announced that it has added another $3 million to its coffers as part of a "Series A Extension."


Built buys fellow construction robotics firm, Roin • TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

One of the most remarkable things about construction robotics is the sheer breadth of tasks that can potentially be automated. As I've noted before, the entire category is a prime target for robotics startups, given that it fills all of the big Ds of automation -- dull, dirty and (quite often) dangerous. It's also one of those areas that have become increasingly difficult to staff, post-pandemic, even as construction work came roaring back. So, if I'm running a fairly successful company that makes construction robots, I'm certainly thinking of diversification. The quickest way to jump start that is, of course, acquiring another, smaller startup.


Will builders be replaced by robots? More than 7,000 Robots Will Work in Construction by 2025

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Use of robots in construction will rapidly expand in the coming years with increasing speed, efficiency, safety, and profits, a new report claims. The industry is'ripe for disruption' after relying on manual labour for so long, according to AI consulting firm Tractica. It cited the recent adoption of robotic technology by a number of companies as the beginning of a growth curve. Projections place the value of the construction robotics industry in the region of $226 million (£173m) by 2025, a 10 fold increase compared to 2018. Wile the majority of demand is likely to come from construction sites such as demolition, a number of more specialised functions such as 3D printing, also face mass automation.


Retrofit: The $15.5 trillion industry undergoing a robotic remodel

ZDNet

A Turkish architecture firm is sharing plans for a new Robot Science Museum in Seoul, which will be constructed using robots. First reported by Dezeen, the Seoul Metropolitan Government has commissioned the building as a kind of robot museum, which makes the use of robot builders a mind-bending meta statement on 21st century technology worship. The global construction market could billow to $15.5 trillion by 2030 and is a key driver of economic vitality and wellbeing. Yet the sector is beset by labor and productivity shortfalls and has not kept with innovation. Robotics firms have taken note.


Will robots enable an architectural renaissance?

ZDNet

Robotic construction company Odico has raised nearly $5 million after listing on Nasdaq First North this month. The startup is part of a growing number of robotics companies focused on the construction industry, which has been operating in largely the same way for over a century. The market for construction robots is set to grow to $166.4 million by 2023, according to research from Markets & Markets. Odico's niche is freeform architecture incorporating complex shapes, which are exceedingly difficult to manufacture using conventional methods. "Throughout at least five thousand years, architects have been working with a lot of constraints and dependencies in their work," says Odico CEO Anders Bundsgaard.


Robots break new ground in construction industry

#artificialintelligence

As a teenager working for his dad's construction business, Noah Ready-Campbell dreamed that robots could take over the dirty, tedious parts of his job, such as digging and leveling soil for building projects. Now the former Google engineer is turning that dream into a reality with Built Robotics, a startup that's developing technology to allow bulldozers, excavators and other construction vehicles to operate themselves. "The idea behind Built Robotics is to use automation technology make construction safer, faster and cheaper," said Ready-Campbell, standing in a dirt lot where a small bulldozer moved mounds of earth without a human operator. The San Francisco startup is part of a wave of automation that's transforming the construction industry, which has lagged behind other sectors in technological innovation. Backed by venture capital, tech startups are developing robots, drones, software and other technologies to help the construction industry to boost speed, safety and productivity.


Robots break new ground in construction industry

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As a teenager working for his dad's construction business, Noah Ready-Campbell dreamed that robots could take over the dirty, tedious parts of his job, such as digging and leveling soil for building projects. Now the former Google engineer is turning that dream into a reality with Built Robotics, a startup that's developing technology to allow bulldozers, excavators and other construction vehicles to operate themselves. 'The idea behind Built Robotics is to use automation technology make construction safer, faster and cheaper,' said Ready-Campbell, standing in a dirt lot where a small bulldozer moved mounds of earth without a human operator. The San Francisco startup is part of a wave of automation that's transforming the construction industry, which has lagged behind other sectors in technological innovation. Backed by venture capital, tech startups are developing robots, drones, software and other technologies to help the construction industry to boost speed, safety and productivity.


Tech Startup Develops Robots, Self-Driving Bulldozers For Safer, Cheaper Construction Sites

International Business Times

A San Francisco-based robotics company is developing fully driverless bulldozers and excavators to make construction safer and more effective. Noah Ready-Campbell, the founder and CEO of tech startup Built Robotics, may be at the forefront of making the construction industry more technologically advanced, as the company had raised $15 million according to a CNBC report in October. Built Robotics' website reads: "We are building the future of construction." "The idea behind Built Robotics is to use automation technology make construction safer, faster and cheaper," Ready-Campbell said in an Associated Press report Monday. "The robots basically do 80 percent of the work, which is more repetitive, more dangerous, more monotonous.


Japan's labor-scarce building sites automating, turning to robots, drones

The Japan Times

Construction sites in Japan are enjoying a wave of automation amid an increasing shortage of laborers, with the introduction of robots to do heavy lifting and drones that instantly collect aerial data. As the industry ages along with the country's graying society, construction companies are forced to look for ways to boost productivity and efficiency. According to the Japan Federation of Construction Contractors, there will be 1.28 million fewer construction workers by fiscal 2025 compared with fiscal 2014. In 2015, some 30 percent of all construction workers were aged over 55, while those below 29 accounted for only about 10 percent, according to the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. "We will probably have a total of 900,000 workers joining the industry within the next 10 years, but the 300,000 shortage will need to be covered by boosting productivity," said Atsushi Fujino, a spokesman at major construction firm Kajima Corp. "That's why we are all scrambling for a solution."