Goto

Collaborating Authors

Robots


How to teach computers to recognize dogs and cakes in images

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is a very interesting topic that evokes a lot of emotions. This is due to the fact that the development of new technologies involves many opportunities and threats. Some artificial intelligence technologies have been around for a long time, but advances in computational power and numerical optimization routines, the availability of huge amounts of data, have led to great breakthroughs in this field. Artificial intelligence is widely used to provide personalized recommendations when shopping or simply searching for information on the web. More advanced inventions include autonomous self-driving cars -- which, in a simplified way, make decisions about the next movements of vehicles based on data collected from various types of sensors installed in them.


Tokyo Olympics robot impresses with impeccable shooting during US-France halftime

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. The Tokyo Olympics men's basketball matchup between the U.S. and France was briefly overshadowed by a robot at halftime. The robot was spotted at the foul line taking almost as long as NBA champion Giannis Antetokounmpo to shoot, but the machine made the basket. The robot was then placed at the top of the three-point arch and shot the ball with as much precision as Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry.


Is Artificial Intelligence the Biggest Threat to Humanity? -- Sentient Machines

#artificialintelligence

The creators of these films imagine a world where humans have lost control of the technology they developed and must fight for survival of the human species. It could also be suggested the writers and directors of these films are predicting a world where these things happen. After all, many notable figures in the world of tech such as Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and even Stephen Hawking have all made warnings against the potential consequences of AI. But how accurate is the silver screen's depiction and are the fears of my friend based off of these films warranted? Is AI going rogue, building a robot army and attempting to eradicate humans as likely as finding a dead body on top of a lift or being attacked by a giant shark off the Isle of Wight?


Trucks Move Past Cars on the Road to Autonomy

WIRED

In 2016, three veterans of the still young autonomous vehicle industry formed Aurora, a startup focused on developing self-driving cars. Partnerships followed with major automakers, including Hyundai and Volkswagen. CEO Chris Urmson said at the time that the link-ups would help the company bring "mobility as a service" to urban areas--Uber-like rides without a human behind the wheel. But by late 2019, Aurora's emphasis had shifted. It said self-driving trucks, not cars, would be quicker to hit public roads en masse. Its executives, who had steadfastly refused to provide a timeline for their self-driving-car software, now say trucks equipped with its "Aurora Driver" will hit the roads in 2023 or 2024, with ride-hail vehicles following a year or two later.


Why our fears of job-killing robots are overblown

#artificialintelligence

The more general point is that computer algorithms will have a devil of a time predicting which jobs are most at risk for being replaced by computers, since they have no comprehension of the skills required to do a particular job successfully. In one study that was widely covered (including by The Washington Post, The Economist, Ars Technica, and The Verge), Oxford University researchers used the U.S. Department of Labor's O NET database, which assesses the importance of various skill competencies for hundreds of occupations. For example, using a scale of 0 to 100, O*NET gauges finger dexterity to be more important for dentists (81) than for locksmiths (72) or barbers (60). The Oxford researchers then coded each of 70 occupations as either automatable or not and correlated these yes/no assessments with O*NET's scores for nine skill categories. Using these statistical correlations, the researchers then estimated the probability of computerization for 702 occupations.


Best practices to build data literacy into your Gen Z workforce - Data Dreamer

#artificialintelligence

This is a guest post by Kirk Borne, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer at DataPrime.ai, Kirk is also a consultant, astrophysicist, data scientist, blogger, data literacy advocate and renowned speaker, and is one of the most recognized names in the industry. A survey of 1,100 data practitioners and business leaders reported that 84% of organizations consider data literacy to be a core business skill, agreeing with the statement that the inability of the workforce to use and analyze data effectively can hamper their business success. In addition, 36% said data literacy is crucial to future-proofing their business. Another survey found that 75% of employees are not comfortable using data.


China Roundup: Kai-Fu Lee's first Europe bet, WeRide buys a truck startup – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Hello and welcome back to TechCrunch's China Roundup, a digest of recent events shaping the Chinese tech landscape and what they mean to people in the rest of the world. Despite the geopolitical headwinds for foreign tech firms to enter China, many companies, especially those that find a dependable partner, are still forging ahead. For this week's roundup, I'm including a conversation I had with Prophesee, a French vision technology startup, which recently got funding from Kai-Fu Lee and Xiaomi, along with the usual news digest. Like many companies working on futuristic, cutting-edge tech in Europe, Prophesee was a spinout from university research labs. Previously, I covered two such companies from Sweden: Imint, which improves smartphone video production through deep learning, and Dirac, an expert in sound optimization.


Alphabet's Intrinsic aims to unlock industrial robotics' economic potential

#artificialintelligence

All the sessions from Transform 2021 are available on-demand now. Google parent Alphabet has spun out a new industrial robotics company called Intrinsic. Led by Wendy Tan-White, a veteran entrepreneur and investor who has served as VP of "moonshots" at Alphabet's R&D business X since 2019, Intrinsic is setting out to "unlock the creative and economic potential" of the $42 billion industrial robotics market. The company said it's creating "software tools" to make industrial robots more affordable and easier to use, extending their utility beyond big businesses and to more people -- 70% of the world's manufacturing currently takes place in just 10 countries. Industrial robots have surged in demand over the past year in the wake of the pandemic -- in Q1 this year, the Association for Advancing Automation reported a 19.6% increase in orders across North America alone.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: Hyperautomation: The Next Digital Frontier

#artificialintelligence

If you've ever played with Legos, you know the possibilities are endless. A few blocks can become a toy car. Add a few more and you've got a miniature house. Keep going and you've got an intricate city or life-size statue. The blocks themselves fit together in a near-infinite number of ways.


When Smart Cars make Bad Choices

#artificialintelligence

Its 2030 and a SUV driven by an Autonomous Driving System (ADS) is heading west on a highway. The SUV contains two parents in the front seats and two small children in the back seat. The SUV is going the speed limit of 100 km/hour. The SUV drives through a tight corner and as the SUV makes the final turn a large bull moose weighing over six hundred kilograms shambles onto the road. The autonomous driving system driving the SUV was trained to select the best alternative out of as set of possible outcomes and so the SUV abruptly swerves into the left lane currently occupied by a small sedan going the same speed as the SUV. The SUV ADS had determined that saving the lives of two adults and two children was the greater good even though there was a significant risk that the small sedan would be forced into oncoming traffic travelling East putting the two adult occupants at mortal risk.