Goto

Collaborating Authors

Robots


Why Are Self-Driving Cars the Future and How are They Created?

#artificialintelligence

Due to the recent adaptive quarantine measures imposed in virtually all parts of the world, air travel, public transportation, and many other sectors took a really big hit in 2020. However, the automotive world and autonomous vehicles, in particular, have shown increased resilience during this difficult time. In fact, companies like Ford have increased their investments in the development of electric and self-driving cars by allocating $29 billion dollars in the fourth quarter of last year. Specifically, $7 billion of that money will go towards the development of self-driving cars. So Ford is joining General Motors, Tesla, Baidu, and other automakers in heavily investing in autonomous vehicles.


Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony included a light display with 1,800 drones

Engadget

There may not have been any fans in the Olympic Stadium, but Japan still found a way to put on a show for the opening of the 2020 Summer Games. The host country charmed early with the parade of nations, which featured an orchestrated video game soundtrack, and then showed off the type of creativity it's known for with a performance involving the Olympic pictograms. But Tokyo saved the biggest spectacle for last. Towards the end of the ceremony, a fleet of 1,824 drones took to the skies above the Olympic Stadium. Initially arrayed in the symbol of the 2020 Games, they then took on the shape of the Earth before a rendition of John Lenon's "Imagine," which was reworked by Hans Zimmer for the Olympics, played across the stadium.


Tech Trends to Look Out for in 2021 - EasternEye

#artificialintelligence

The pace at which technology is continuously evolving is unprecedented. Each and every day seemingly brings with it some new and exciting thing to be excited about in the world of tech. Fresh off a year that saw the world retreat indoors in an effort to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus, much of society grew more reliant and more accepting of technology as a whole. Technology played a big role in various aspects of everyday life such as communication, data transfer, analysis, and even entertainment. More than that, in the age of digital information, a smart device is being placed in the hands of someone new every single day.


Algorithm May Help Autonomous Vehicles Navigate Narrow, Crowded Streets

#artificialintelligence

The researchers developed a method to model different levels of driver cooperativeness how likely a driver was to pull over to let the other driver pass and used those models to train an algorithm that could assist an autonomous vehicle to safely and efficiently navigate this situation. An algorithm developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) could enable autonomous vehicles to navigate crowded, narrow streets where vehicles traveling in opposite directions do not have enough space to pass each other and there is no knowledge about what the other driver may do. Such a scenario requires collaboration among drivers, who must balance aggression with cooperation. The researchers modeled different levels of cooperation between drivers and used them to train the algorithm. In simulations, the algorithm was found to outperform current models; it has not yet been tested on real-world vehicles.


Alphabet launches company to make industrial robots more adaptable

ZDNet

Alphabet's X, its R&D lab, announced Friday morning that its next big bet is in industrial robotics. Its new early-stage company Intrinsic is a robotics software and AI company that wants to help robots sense and learn, thereby making them more adaptable to different environments. "The surprisingly manual and bespoke process of teaching robots how to do things, which hasn't changed much over the last few decades, is currently a cap on their potential to help more businesses," Wendy Tan-White, Intrinsic's CEO, wrote in a blog post. "Specialist programmers can spend hundreds of hours hard coding robots to perform specific jobs, like welding two pieces of metal, or gluing together an electronics case. And many dexterous and delicate tasks, like inserting plugs or moving cords, remain unfeasible for robots because they lack the sensors or software needed to understand their physical surroundings."


Alphabet's latest moonshot aims to make industrial robots more practical

Engadget

Alphabet has launched another company in its X moonshot factory, and this one may be its most ambitious robotics project to date. The just-opened firm, Intrinsic, plans to make industrial robots more accessible to people and businesses that couldn't otherwise justify the effort involved to teach the machines. You could see robotic manufacturing in more countries, for example, or small businesses that can automate production that previously required manual labor. Intrinsic will focus on software tools that make these robots easier to use, more flexible and more affordable. To that end, the company has been testing a mix of software tools that include AI techniques like automated perception, motion planning and reinforcement learning.


RO-MAN 2021 Roboethics Competition: Bringing ethical robots into the home

Robohub

In 1984, Heathkit presented HERO Jr. as the first robot that could be used in households to perform a variety of tasks, such as guarding people's homes, setting reminders, and even playing games. Following this development, many companies launched affordable "smart robots" that could be used within the household. Some of these technologies, like Google Home, Amazon Echo and Roomba, have become household staples; meanwhile, other products such as Jibo, Aniki, and Kuri failed to successfully launch despite having all the necessary resources. Why were these robots shut down? The simple answer is that most of these personal robots do not work well--but this is not necessarily because we do not have the technological capacity to build highly functional robots.


Work in these sectors? Here's how drones can help your bottom line

ZDNet

Industrial drones are nothing new, but the growth curve and pace of adoption is pretty astounding. The adoption of industrial drone programs by industry is expected to increase at a 66.8% compound annual growth rate over the next year. The best aerial hardware and technology stacks for keeping an eye on operations, individuals, and valued assets from above. Industrial drones are being used in major industries like insurance, mining and aggregates, using cutting-edge technologies (AI, machine learning, and deep data analytics, to name a few) to drastically reduce the time workers spend gathering and analyzing data while increasing accuracy and positively impacting the bottom line. All of these working together result in a growing field impacting industrial work and forever changing how these industries operate on a daily basis globally: smart inspections.


Russia's Cutting-edge Drone Unveiled at MAKS 2021 - ELE Times

#artificialintelligence

Zala Aero, a Russian UAV manufacturer, presented its state-of-the-art vertical takeoff and landing drone – the ZALA VTOL – at the MAKS 2021 International Aviation and Space Salon, the company told reporters during the air show. "The ZALA VTOL combines the properties of an airplane type drone and a tilt-rotor aircraft. The flight configuration changes depending on the assigned mission. The electric propulsion system enables the aircraft to be in the air for up to 4 hours, providing a range of up to 200 km in aircraft configuration," the company said. The built-in on-board computer ZX1 based on artificial intelligence makes it possible to process Full HD format data and transmit HD videos and photos over encrypted communication links to a ground control station.


Why Robopets Will Never Be Real Enough

#artificialintelligence

Every morning, I am stirred awake by one of the dumbest creatures in existence: a once-abandoned, now adopted 3-year-old orange tabby cat named Cheddar. In exchange for this wake up service, Cheddar gets free meals, pricy vet trips, and plenty of scritches, as do tens of millions of other pets in the U.S. alone. The more cynical among us might say that pets are little more than expensive and far too loud roommates. Not only do you have to regularly pay attention to and feed these roomies, but oftentimes you'll need to fork over lots of money to keep them alive, particularly for breeds predisposed to health problems. It shouldn't be surprising, then, that for decades, some segment of the population has hoped that these furballs could one day be replaced by mechanical facsimiles with less upkeep and cost but all the benefits of domestic companionship--a robotic pet, in so many words.