Robots


Uber, Google, Facebook: Your experiments have gone too far

Engadget

It was 2014, around the time when Travis Kalanick referred to Uber as his chick-magnet "Boober" in a GQ article, that I'd realized congestion in San Francisco had gone insane. Before there was Uber, getting across town took about ten minutes by car and there was nowhere to park, ever. With Boober in play, there was parking in places there never were spaces, but the streets were so jammed with empty, one-person "gig economy" cars circling, sitting in bus zones, mowing down bicyclists whilst fussing with their phones, still endlessly going nowhere, alone, that walking across the city was faster. To be fair, you wouldn't know there were 5,700 more vehicles a day on our roads if you'd just moved here. Nor if you were pouring Uber-delivered champagne over yourself in a tub of stock options while complaining about San Francisco's homeless from the comfort of your company-rental Airbnb where artists or Mexican families once lived.


Robotic indoor farms can grow food anywhere, anytime

ZDNet

Robots could turn a basic concept of farming on its head. What if, instead of growing crops in rows spread across many acres of land, food could be grown in vertical columns? A Cincinnati-based firm called 80 Acres Farms is testing this concept and seeking to prove that automated indoor farming can be safer and more profitable than traditional methods. Indoor farming controls environmental factors so that crops such as lettuce can be grown anywhere, anytime, making fresh food available year-round, regardless of location. A traditional farm might have three seasons, but Hamilton's new indoor farm is expected to turn over leafy greens every three weeks.


Papago GoSafe S810 dash cam review: It nails video, but lacks battery and integrated GPS

PCWorld

The Papago GoSafe S810 camera duo has more "safety" features than you can shake a stick at, including one I'd never even considered--stop sign recognition. It recognizes stop signs and pops the digital equivalent up on its display. Kind of fun, but as I'm wont to say: If you need this stuff, call a cab or wait for self-driving vehicles. Admonishment aside, the $170 S810 is more than just fancy features. It takes very, very good day and night video, and the rear camera, unlike some we've seen recently, actually captures enough detail to be useful.


Tesla shelves the full self-driving option you couldn't use

Engadget

Ever since Tesla hinted at its autonomous future, there's been a "Full Self-Driving Capability" checkbox on the order page for its cars -- spend several grand and your car would one day steer itself. It has yet to materialize, though, and now Tesla has removed the option from its site. You can still order it "off menu" for a week as of Musk's tweet (approximately October 25th) or add it to your existing car for $5,000, but new customers will have to'settle' for Enhanced Autopilot. The option was "causing too much confusion," Elon Musk said. Of course, it doesn't help that Tesla has also been facing lawsuits over the phantom nature of the feature, not to mention advocacy groups claiming the Autopilot name was misleading.


Nat Geo and OpenROV are giving away 1000 robot submarines

Engadget

Despite having lived in close proximity to it for hundreds of thousands of years, humanity has yet to explore even a fraction of the Earth's ocean. We have more thoroughly mapped the surfaces of moon and Mars than we have the seafloor. National Geographic and OpenROV hope to change that next year with the Science Exploration Education (SEE) initiative. The organizations are teaming up to give away 1,000 remotely operated underwater drones to any research organization or citizen scientist who wants one (and, obviously, asks while there are still some in stock). "One of the limiting factors for understanding the ocean is the risks, costs, and accessibility issues of experiencing these underwater ecosystems," David Lang, co-founder of OpenROV, said in a statement.


Kids and parents are going to love these room cleaning robots

USATODAY

This robot that tidies up for you is literally every kid and parents dream. A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. This robot that tidies up for you is literally every kid and parents dream.


Secret Google kite project on verge of launching

The Independent

A project from Google's secretive X division that uses giant plane-like kites to generate renewable electricity may be about to be launched. Makani Power has been developing airborne wind turbines with the support of the Internet giant's research and development facility founded to pursue "moonshot" ideas. If successful the plan would negate the need for costly construction materials and labour that is required for ground-based wind turbines. But after more than 10 years of development, the kites are yet to be used beyond testing. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


Collaborative Robots, Advanced Vision & AI Conference

#artificialintelligence

The next frontier for robotics is in durable goods assembly, which has seen multiple failed experiments in industrial automation to date. Now huge improvements are possible Title: The End of Fear, and How It Will Change Durable Goods Manufacturing Length of presentation: 45 minutes (including time for questions) Point 1: Even in the largest and most sophisticated manufacturers in the world, much of durable goods manufacturing is highly manual. Attempts at intensive automation in this sector have been made and have failed repeatedly over the past 40 years, most recently at Tesla Motors. In fact, full automation in final assembly tends to correlate inversely with profitability, quality and returns on investment in durable goods manufacturing. Instead, the most successful manufacturers are the ones who recognize and make use of the ingenuity of production workers.


Accenture Beefs Up Financial Services Muscle With TargetST8 Buy

#artificialintelligence

Accenture has acquired a financial services firm that specializes in using artificial intelligence and robotic process automation in corporate and commercial lending, the company said Wednesday. TargetST8 Consulting, which was founded in 2013, focuses exclusively on the financial markets, serving banks and investment firms in the U.S. and Europe, Accenture said. TargetST8 provides customers with digital lending solutions that include deploying artificial intelligence and robotic process automation, according to Accenture. "TargetST8 consultants are known for their deep expertise, innovative digital solutions and outstanding project delivery--particularly in their implementation of Finastra's Loan IQ solution," said Alan McIntyre, who leads Accenture's banking practice globally. "The addition of TargetST8 will enhance our ability to help our commercial and corporate lending clients improve their processes and transform their businesses."


Artificial Intelligence Special Report

#artificialintelligence

A push for a global agreement on autonomous weapons is stalled, much to the chagrin of advocates who believe a treaty is urgently needed. From Singapore to Israel, countries besides the United States and China are striving to play a role in the field of artificial intelligence. Fully autonomous cars are years away, but it's the automobile where artificial intelligence could have a critical role for the greatest number of people. Data and tech expects share their takes on the current A.I. revolution Artificial intelligence has its own insider jargon. Here are some crucial concepts and terms, defined and digested for the rest of us.