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Top 5 Creepy Robots

#artificialintelligence

We were used to hearing that we'll be out of a job in twenty years, because of robots. Then the virus came, and now many are out of a job a bit faster, and not because of anything more intelligent or capable than themselves. Here are five currently existing robots that score pretty high on the creepiness scale, even without threatening to take away one's job. Sophia has somehow become the flagship of humanoid robotics. Constructed in Hong Kong, it has taken part in major TV talk shows and has been granted Saudi Arabian citizenship, although it is, essentially, not more than a "chatbot with a face" [1]. What the citizenship thing really means is unclear: Can Sophia vote?


Biden town hall on CNN blasted for too many 'softball' questions

FOX News

Here's what you need to know as you start your day ... Biden town hall on CNN blasted for too many'softball' questions CNN hosted a Joe Biden town hall event at a Pennsylvania baseball stadium Thursday night, but critics said many of the questions made it seem the night's game was softball instead. The evening differed sharply from the grilling President Trump took during ABC News' town hall program two nights earlier, they said. "In the first moments, the contrast between what Trump was asked and what Biden is being asked is striking," Politico columnist Jeff Greenfield tweeted, later writing. "Biden is doing very well, yes. But this is not exactly getting him ready to face tough questions from a Chris Wallace or Jake Tapper (should he decide to do so)."


Doing The Hard Things: AI, Space, and Climate Science

#artificialintelligence

"We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters" -Peter Thiel The closing quarter of the twentieth century was peak tech innovation in the United States. AT&T's Bell Labs invented the information age with the transistor and data networking, and many transformative technologies tangential to its core business: from solar cells to the Unix operating system to lasers.1 Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) brought about human-computer interaction with the initial computer mouse, as well as laser printing and Ethernet networking.2 In the 80's Pixar was born, creating the first ever computer-animated sequence in a feature film with novel computer-generated imagery (CGI).3,4 At the same time Gates and Allen were hacking at something special that soon revolutionized computing, as were Wozniak and Jobs.5,6 Amidst the heyday of invention in the world of bits, the "space race" brought about massive innovation and accomplishments in the world of atoms: government competition between the US and Russia put humans on the moon for the first time.


Doing The Hard Things: AI, Space, and Climate Science

#artificialintelligence

"We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters" -Peter Thiel The closing quarter of the twentieth century was peak tech innovation in the United States. AT&T's Bell Labs invented the information age with the transistor and data networking, and many transformative technologies tangential to its core business: from solar cells to the Unix operating system to lasers.1 Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) brought about human-computer interaction with the initial computer mouse, as well as laser printing and Ethernet networking.2 In the 80's Pixar was born, creating the first ever computer-animated sequence in a feature film with novel computer-generated imagery (CGI).3,4 At the same time Gates and Allen were hacking at something special that soon revolutionized computing, as were Wozniak and Jobs.5,6 Amidst the heyday of invention in the world of bits, the "space race" brought about massive innovation and accomplishments in the world of atoms: government competition between the US and Russia put humans on the moon for the first time.


Human-in-the-Loop Methods for Data-Driven and Reinforcement Learning Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Recent successes combine reinforcement learning algorithms and deep neural networks, despite reinforcement learning not being widely applied to robotics and real world scenarios. This can be attributed to the fact that current state-of-the-art, end-to-end reinforcement learning approaches still require thousands or millions of data samples to converge to a satisfactory policy and are subject to catastrophic failures during training. Conversely, in real world scenarios and after just a few data samples, humans are able to either provide demonstrations of the task, intervene to prevent catastrophic actions, or simply evaluate if the policy is performing correctly. This research investigates how to integrate these human interaction modalities to the reinforcement learning loop, increasing sample efficiency and enabling real-time reinforcement learning in robotics and real world scenarios. This novel theoretical foundation is called Cycle-of-Learning, a reference to how different human interaction modalities, namely, task demonstration, intervention, and evaluation, are cycled and combined to reinforcement learning algorithms. Results presented in this work show that the reward signal that is learned based upon human interaction accelerates the rate of learning of reinforcement learning algorithms and that learning from a combination of human demonstrations and interventions is faster and more sample efficient when compared to traditional supervised learning algorithms. Finally, Cycle-of-Learning develops an effective transition between policies learned using human demonstrations and interventions to reinforcement learning. The theoretical foundation developed by this research opens new research paths to human-agent teaming scenarios where autonomous agents are able to learn from human teammates and adapt to mission performance metrics in real-time and in real world scenarios.


How 2000s movies thought the world would end

Mashable

We're exploring the pop culture that shaped us at the turn of the millennium, and examining what the films, shows, and games from the era say about us then and now. It's a little #tbt to the days before #tbt was a thing. At the stroke of midnight on Jan. 1, 2000, the mythical Y2K'millennium bug' did not cause the apocalyptic chaos many had predicted. However, plenty of significant events would happen over the next 10 years, moments that would change the world as we knew it. But they weren't necessarily what the ones we thought would bring about the end the world, if you're judging by the imaginations of our cinema-makers during this decade.


GPT-3 Creative Fiction

#artificialintelligence

What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.


Apple: EU opens major investigation into App Store and Apple Pay

The Independent - Tech

The EU has opened a major investigation into Apple over concerns that it uses its platforms unfairly. The EU commission will pursue antitrust investigations against the company over its App Store and Apple Pay products, which critics argue have stifled competition. The Commission said it was investigating Apple Pay over allegations the tech giant wields its control over the Pay platform to force developers into using it over others. It said a preliminary investigation had raised concerns that "Apple's terms, conditions, and other measures related to the integration of Apple Pay" may "distort competition and reduce choice and innovation". In addition, the EU Commission announced it had opened a second investigation into concerns that the firm's App Store restricts developers from informing iPhone and iPad users of alternative purchasing possibilities, instead pushing "mandatory use of Apple's own proprietary in-app purchase system".


25 technologies that have changed the world

#artificialintelligence

You may even be using one to read this article. Wi-Fi has become essential to our personal and professional lives. The smartphone and the internet we use today wouldn't have been possible without wireless communication technologies such as Wi-Fi. In 1995 if you wanted to "surf" the internet at home, you had to chain yourself to a network cable like it was an extension cord. In 1997, Wi-Fi was invented and released for consumer use.


Lockdown: Ofcom says internet speeds functioning as normal despite major Virgin Media and other broadband outages

The Independent - Tech

Internet speeds are still running largely as normal despite the increased pressure of lockdown, according to research from regulator Ofcom. Download speeds have only dropped by an average of 2 per cent, according to the research, even with the extra load. That is despite some high-profile outages, including Virgin Media problems that took the internet offline for users across the country. Networks have been under increased strain with more people across the country working from home, children using online platforms to carry on school work, and greater gaming and streaming as a source of entertainment. The communications regulator measured broadband performance for 3,481 users at the beginning and end of March, to compare results before and after lockdown started.