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Standing Ai (Artificial intelligence) - A brief history - Diginixai

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Thirty years ago, everybody was thinking about flying cars. Do we have flying cars now?? of course not! But we have something better. AI, wheel of our times, it will change the world as the invention of wheel did in the stone age. The term'artificial intelligence' was given by John Mccarthy way back in the 50's, but the journey of understanding the process took more than half of a century.


21 Most Popular Artificial Intelligence Questions Answered

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Artificial intelligence sets the stage for a new era of solutions to be made with computers. It allows us to solve problems that we could not have imagined in the past. To clear up some of the confusion I decided to make this video where I answer the most popular AI questions. The ideas about Artificial Intelligence evolved through centuries, starting with greek myths about Intelligent robots (Talos myth), but AI as we know it today only emerged in 1955. The term was coined by Alan Turing, Marvin Minsky, Allen Newell, Herber A.Simon, and John McCarthy.



A Brief History of AI, From French Philosophy to Self-Driving Cars - Dell Technologies

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And yet, AI's current automated task-mastering was first posited by the French philosopher René Descartes almost 400 years ago. Descartes, who famously coined, "I think, therefore I am," pondered about the ability of machines to reason. While machines may be able to "do some things as well, or better, than humans, they would inevitably fail in others," whereas human reason can universally adapt to any task. Though Descartes' idea of machines differs from today's reality, some say he threw down the gauntlet for what we now refer to as general AI--or machines that can think like humans. Though Descartes' idea of machines differs from today's reality, some say he threw down the gauntlet for what we now refer to as general AI--or machines that can think like humans.


London exhibitions reviewed: Secrets, autonomous vehicles and AI ZDNet

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London, and particularly the Science Museum, has a long, solid history of mounting exhibitions on information technology topics, from its 1991 reconstruction of Babbage's Difference Engine to the industrial robots it featured in the late 1990s (which health and safety insisted should be behind glass), their humanoid fellows in 2017, and the 2014 exploration of the information age. This summer, the city has three such exhibitions running simultaneously, two of them at the Science Museum. You could summarize them as: 1) What have you done for us lately?; 2) What are you going to do for us?; and 3) Why is it taking so long? The first is GCHQ's romp through the history of keeping secrets, Top Secret: From ciphers to cyber security. This moves from the earliest times through Mary Queen of Scots' coded letters to World War II (GCHQ's formation, Bletchley Park and Alan Turing) and the Cold War.


Evolution of AI: Past, Present, Future

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Although the concept of artificial intelligence has been around for centuries it wasn't until the 1950's where the true possibility of it was explored. A generation of scientists, mathematicians and philosophers all had the concept of AI but it wasn't until one British Polymath, Alan Turing, suggested that if humans use available information, as well as reason, to solve problems and make decisions -- then why can't machines do the same thing? Although Turing outlined machines and how to test their intelligence in his paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence in 1950 -- his findings did not advance. The main halt in growth was the problem of computers. Before any more growth could happen they needed to change fundamentally -- computers could execute commands, but they could not store them.


Artificial Intelligence an "Alchemy" – techutzpah – Medium

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John McCarthy first coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" (AI) in 1956 at the Dartmouth Conference along with four other founding colleagues -- Marvin Minsky, Oliver Selfridge, Ray Solomonoff, and Trenchard More. The original definition and concept of AI according to John McCarthy is "Every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so preciously described that a machine can be made to simulate it. An attempt will be made t find how to make machines and concepts, solve kinds of problems now reserved for humans, and improve themselves." What it simply means is that AI is a term for "simulated intelligence" in machines. The machines are programmed to mimic the cognitive functions of the human brain.


Artificial Intelligence an "Alchemy" - BlockDelta

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John McCarthy first coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" (AI) in 1956 at the Dartmouth Conference along with four other founding colleagues – Marvin Minsky, Oliver Selfridge, Ray Solomonoff, and Trenchard More. The original definition and concept of AI according to John McCarthy is "Every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so preciously described that a machine can be made to simulate it. An attempt will be made to find how to make machines and concepts, solve kinds of problems now reserved for humans, and improve themselves." What it simply means is that AI is a term for "simulated intelligence" in machines. The machines are programmed to mimic the cognitive functions of the human brain.


The Real Risks of Artificial Intelligence

Communications of the ACM

The vast increase in speed, memory capacity, and communications ability allows today's computers to do things that were unthinkable when I started programming six decades ago. Then, computers were primarily used for numerical calculations; today, they process text, images, and sound recordings. Then, it was an accomplishment to write a program that played chess badly but correctly. Today's computers have the power to compete with the best human players. The incredible capacity of today's computing systems allows some purveyors to describe them as having "artificial intelligence" (AI). They claim that AI is used in washing machines, the "personal assistants" in our mobile devices, self-driving cars, and the giant computers that beat human champions at complex games. Remarkably, those who use the term "artificial intelligence" have not defined that term. I first heard the term more than 50 years ago and have yet to hear a scientific definition. Even now, some AI experts say that defining AI is a difficult (and important) question--one that they are working on. "Artificial intelligence" remains a buzzword, a word that many think they understand but nobody can define. Application of AI methods can lead to devices and systems that are untrustworthy and sometimes dangerous.


The Quest to Measure Machine Intelligence

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We have self-driving cars, knowledgeable digital assistants, and software capable of putting names to faces as well as any expert. Google recently announced that it had developed software capable of learning--entirely without human help--how to play several classic Atari computer games with skill far beyond that of even the most callus-thumbed human player. But do these displays of machine aptitude represent genuine intelligence? For decades artificial-intelligence experts have struggled to find a practical way to answer the question. AI is an idea so commonplace that few of us bother to interrogate its meaning.