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The future of work: What you need to know about the hybrid workplace

#artificialintelligence

In the wake of the pandemic, the outlines of a new kind of digital workplace are starting to emerge. Get a glimpse of the future in this short video. Large numbers of employees have adjusted successfully to working remotely. Many businesses are looking for new ways to support online productivity and strengthen business resiliency with remote capabilities, while ensuring a safe return to work for on-site employees. So what does the future of work look like?


The Top 100 Software Companies of 2021

#artificialintelligence

The Software Report is pleased to announce The Top 100 Software Companies of 2021. This year's awardee list is comprised of a wide range of companies from the most well-known such as Microsoft, Adobe, and Salesforce to the relatively newer but rapidly growing - Qualtrics, Atlassian, and Asana. A good number of awardees may be new names to some but that should be no surprise given software has always been an industry of startups that seemingly came out of nowhere to create and dominate a new space. Software has become the backbone of our economy. From large enterprises to small businesses, most all rely on software whether for accounting, marketing, sales, supply chain, or a myriad of other functions. Software has become the dominant industry of our time and as such, we place a significance on highlighting the best companies leading the industry forward. The following awardees were nominated and selected based on a thorough evaluation process. Among the key criteria considered were ...


Daily Crunch: Before the pandemic, Expensify made remote work cool and profitable – TechCrunch

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To get a roundup of TechCrunch's biggest and most important stories delivered to your inbox every day at 3 p.m. PDT, subscribe here. Welcome to Daily Crunch for May 25, 2021. Whether you are a developer, a startup fanatic or merely someone with wanderlust, we have something for everyone today. Well, except for disappointed investors in Lordstown Motors. They are stuck holding the bag today after the American electric vehicle company announced a pretty awful set of earnings.


Future of work: Five new features of your remote workplace in 2021

ZDNet

COVID-19 has turned the world of work on its head, with many of us having spent most of 2020 separated from our colleagues and logging-in to greet each other every day from our bedrooms, living spaces, and other cobbled-together places of work. It's a year that has asked a lot of us all, and with 2021 now – somehow – on the horizon, many will be wondering what the next 12 months has in store. One thing seems certain: the new remote-working landscape hastily hammered out by 2020 won't be disappearing any time soon. In fact, working from home at least part of the time looks set to be the new way of doing things for the foreseeable future. And while organizations might have a better grasp on the technical challenges than they did at the start of the year, there is still a litany of issues to overcome if we want to make this "new normal" truly work.


Back to the office in 2021? Here are ten things that will have changed

ZDNet

For some, it will soon be a year since the last time they set foot in an office. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to sweep through countries, it is sometimes hard to remember that days were once punctuated by a daily commute, water cooler chats and afterwork drinks. But although the timeline is still unclear, offices will inevitably re-open in the future – leaving many wondering what kind of a workspace they will be stepping into on the day that they get to dust off their office shoes. Analysis firm CCS Insights predicts that in 2022 more than half of all office-based employees will still work mainly remotely. Whether you are team WFH, or increasingly desperate to return to the comfort of an office desk, one thing is for certain: with half of the workforce at home, at least on a semi-permanent basis, workspaces will no longer be designed to accommodate floods of employees coming in every morning for another nine-to-five shift.


2021 prediction: 35% of global firms will double-down on workplace AI

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) in the workplace has long been a sensitive topic. Many people see it as robots taking over their jobs, while some firms remain sceptical about the technology due to the costs. But, in the face of the coronavirus crisis many businesses have come around to the benefits of AI. According to a report by Forrester, AI adoption grew by 15 percentage points in 2020. Forrester suggests that firms will tackle all the negative ideas of AI in 2021. Forrester says that in 2021, "the grittiest of companies will push AI to new frontiers, such as holographic meetings for remote work and on-demand personalised manufacturing."


Human Skills Will Be Most Important In The Digital Future Of Work

#artificialintelligence

As many of us have moved to working from home and many companies have decided to keep remote working ... [ ] as a permanent option, the future of jobs looks like it will be increasingly digital but also increasingly focused on wellbeing and self-management. Human skills, not technology alone, will help us through the'double-disruption' of Covid and automation. A new report by the World Economic Forum (WEF) on the Future of Jobs has highlighted the need to build on self-management and critical thinking skills, so that we can harness an increase in automation and an impending Covid-triggered recession to usher in a new wave of jobs that take advantage of both automation and human creativity and adaptability. As the pandemic has pushed many people into working remotely and using many different technologies to work and relax, the importance of wellbeing as well as the utility of technology have come into stark focus, and created a unique foundation on which to build new jobs and a new way of working. For many years, automation technologies have been changing how we work, by taking on more of the mundane, repetitive tasks that they are designed for.


Dropbox is the latest San Francisco tech company to make remote work permanent

#artificialintelligence

San Francisco-based Dropbox announced Tuesday that it will stop asking employees to come into its offices and instead make remote work the standard practice, even after the coronavirus pandemic ends. "Remote work (outside an office) will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work," the company said in a blog post. For employees who need to meet or work together in person, the company is setting up "Dropbox Studios" in San Francisco, Seattle, Austin and Dublin when it's safe to do so. The company extended its mandatory work-from-home policy through June 2021. "We'll have Studios in all locations we currently have offices--whether they're dedicated spaces in places we currently have long-term leases and a high concentration of employees (San Francisco, Seattle, Austin, and Dublin to start) or on-demand spaces in other geographies," the company said.


10 tech predictions that could mean huge changes ahead

#artificialintelligence

An ongoing health crisis and a global recession: even for the most attuned of analysts, the past months have brought in a load of unexpected events that have made the coming years especially difficult to envision. Yet research firm CCS Insights has taken up the challenge and delivered a set of 100 tech predictions for the years 2021 and beyond. The exercise is an annual one for the company, which last year anticipated, among many other things, that the next decade could see the rise of deep fake detection technology, or the adoption of domestic robots in some households. One year later, and many of those predictions have been affected in one way or another by the COVID-19 pandemic. "What we've seen in the last few months has completely transformed a lot of the areas we cover," Angela Ashenden, principal analyst at CCS Insights, told ZDNet.


10 tech predictions that could mean huge changes ahead

ZDNet

An on-going health crisis and a global recession: even for the most attuned of analysts, the past months have brought in a load of unexpected events that have made the coming years especially difficult to envision. Yet research firm CCS Insights has taken up the challenge and delivered a set of 100 tech predictions for the years 2021 and beyond. The exercise is an annual one for the company, which last year anticipated, among many other things, that the next decade could see the rise of deep fake detection technology, or the adoption of domestic robots in some households. One year later, and many of those predictions have been affected in a way or the other by the COVID-19 pandemic. "What we've seen in the last few months has completely transformed a lot of the areas we cover," Angela Ashenden, principal analyst at CCS Insights, told ZDNet.