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DASH: Modularized Human Manipulation Simulation with Vision and Language for Embodied AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Creating virtual humans with embodied, human-like perceptual and actuation constraints has the promise to provide an integrated simulation platform for many scientific and engineering applications. We present Dynamic and Autonomous Simulated Human (DASH), an embodied virtual human that, given natural language commands, performs grasp-and-stack tasks in a physically-simulated cluttered environment solely using its own visual perception, proprioception, and touch, without requiring human motion data. By factoring the DASH system into a vision module, a language module, and manipulation modules of two skill categories, we can mix and match analytical and machine learning techniques for different modules so that DASH is able to not only perform randomly arranged tasks with a high success rate, but also do so under anthropomorphic Figure 1: Our system, dynamic and autonomous simulated constraints and with fluid and diverse motions. The modular design human (DASH), is an embodied virtual human modeled off also favors analysis and extensibility to more complex manipulation of a child. DASH is able to manipulate tabletop objects with a skills.


AI Research Considerations for Human Existential Safety (ARCHES)

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Framed in positive terms, this report examines how technical AI research might be steered in a manner that is more attentive to humanity's long-term prospects for survival as a species. In negative terms, we ask what existential risks humanity might face from AI development in the next century, and by what principles contemporary technical research might be directed to address those risks. A key property of hypothetical AI technologies is introduced, called \emph{prepotence}, which is useful for delineating a variety of potential existential risks from artificial intelligence, even as AI paradigms might shift. A set of \auxref{dirtot} contemporary research \directions are then examined for their potential benefit to existential safety. Each research direction is explained with a scenario-driven motivation, and examples of existing work from which to build. The research directions present their own risks and benefits to society that could occur at various scales of impact, and in particular are not guaranteed to benefit existential safety if major developments in them are deployed without adequate forethought and oversight. As such, each direction is accompanied by a consideration of potentially negative side effects.