Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


Rise of the machines: Robot umpires moving up to Triple-A baseball for 2022

#artificialintelligence

Robot umpires have been given a promotion and will be just one step from the major leagues this season. Major League Baseball is expanding its automated strike zone experiment to Triple-A, the highest level of the minor leagues. MLB's website posted a hiring notice seeking seasonal employees to operate the Automated Ball and Strike system. MLB said it is recruiting employees to operate the system for the Albuquerque Isotopes, Charlotte Knights, El Paso Chihuahuas, Las Vegas Aviators, Oklahoma City Dodgers, Reno Aces, Round Rock Express, Sacramento River Cats, Salt Lake Bees, Sugar Land Skeeters and Tacoma Rainiers. The independent Atlantic League became the first American professional league to let a computer call balls and strikes at its All-Star Game in July 2019 and experimented with ABS during the second half of that season. It also was used in the Arizona Fall League for top prospects in 2019, drawing complaints of its calls on breaking balls.


Robot umpires? Let's leave baseball to real, live human beings.

#artificialintelligence

I have nothing against progress. Some of my best friends are traveling shoe salesmen, and I can't tell you how many times my stone hand ax has come in handy around the cave. But I can't shake the feeling we've gone a tad too far with technology. The latest assault on our humanity came Thursday, when news broke that Major League Baseball would use an automated strike zone at Triple-A this season. It means robot umpires will be one heartbeat from the big leagues -- a ''heartbeat'' being that thing once used to deduce whether a ''person'' was alive.


'Robot umpires' coming to Triple A ball this year after tryout in lower leagues

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Robotic umpires that use an automated system for determining ball and strike calls will now be used in Triple-A baseball for the 2022 season, MLB officials announced. This puts the Automated Ball and Strike (ABS) system, which has seen success after experimental adoption by some ballparks in the minor leagues, just one level below the major leagues. MLB'S SNAIL-PACED LOCKOUT TALKS TO RESUME WITH UNION OFFER MLB is currently seeking personnel to operate the system at ballparks for the Albuquerque Isotopes, Charlotte Knights, El Paso Chihuahuas, Las Vegas Aviators, Oklahoma City Dodgers, Reno Aces, Round Rock Express, Sacramento River Cats, Salt Lake Bees, Sugar Land Skeeters and Tacoma Rainiers, FOX 13 of Seattle reported.


Invasion of the Robot Umpires

The New Yorker

Grown men wearing tights like to yell terrible things at Fred DeJesus. DeJesus is an umpire in the outer constellations of professional baseball, where he's been spat on and, once, challenged to a postgame fight in a parking lot. He was born in Bushwick, Brooklyn, to Puerto Rican parents, stands five feet three, and is shaped, in his chest protector, like a fire hydrant; he once ejected a player for saying that he suffered from "little-man syndrome." Two years ago, DeJesus became the first umpire in a regular-season game anywhere to use something called the Automated Ball-Strike System. Most players refer to it as the "robo-umpire."


Getting Banned From Riding In AI Self-Driving Cars For The Rest Of Your Entire Life

#artificialintelligence

People are increasingly getting onto those banned no-fly types of lists, which could happen with ... [ ] self-driving cars too. People keep getting banned for doing the darndest and seemingly dumbest of acts. Oftentimes getting banned for the rest of their entire life. You might have heard or seen the recent brouhaha in major league baseball when a spectator in Yankee Stadium seated above leftfield opted to throw a baseball down onto the field that then struck the Boston Red Sox player Alex Verdugo in the back. He was not hurt, but you can imagine the personal dismay and shock at suddenly and unexpectedly having a projectile strike him from behind, seemingly out of nowhere. Turns out that Alex had earlier tossed the same baseball up into the stands as a memento for a young Red Sox cheering attendee. By some boorish grabbing, it had ended up in the hands of a New York Yankees fan. Next, after some hysterical urging by other frenetic Yankees to toss it back, the young man did so. Whether this act of defiance was intentionally devised to smack the left-fielder is still unclear and it could have been a happenstance rather than a purposeful aim.


'Gutfeld!' on CNN, Olympic Games

FOX News

'Gutfeld!' panel debates whether CNN will change their coverage This is a rush transcript from "Gutfeld!," This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated. I want to protect free speech. No, we want people to be protected from disinformation, to be protected from dying in this country, to be protected from people like Donald Trump who spread this information for -- who love to make sure that the division and the death continues. That was a rough weekend, and not just for Kat. But at least she kept her clothes on unlike our other guests, Jimmy Failla. But it was a far worse weekend for CNN. First let's go to our roly-poly guacamole gossip goalie. See how bad it got unreliable fart noises. Here's Michael Wolff delivering that smack to the hack. You know, you become part of -- one of the parts of the problem of the media. You know, you come on here and you -- and you have a, you know, a monopoly on truth. You know, you know exactly how things are supposed to be done. You know, you are why one of the reasons people can't stand the media. You should see the rest of the world, buddy. Can I hear that chuckle again? But if that was a heavyweight fight, and it is because, you know, Stelter, it would have been stopped in the first 25 seconds. It got worse, meaning better, lots better. STELTER: It's -- how -- so what should I do differently, Michael? WOLFF: You know, don't talk so much. Listen more, you know, people have genuine problems with the media. The media doesn't get the story right.


Robot umps and dogs, minor league ball back after lost year

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. It took just four batters at George Steinbrenner Field before a fan yelled "C'mon, blue!" toward home plate umpire Kaleb Devier after two consecutive close pitches were called balls. Never mind that a computer was making the calls. Didn't matter on Tuesday night as the Tampa Tarpons took on the Dunedin Blue Jays.


Minor League Baseball To Experiment With Robotic Umpires

NPR Technology

Umpires will have a little help behind home plate in some minor league games this season – from a "robot ump." Major League Baseball announced Thursday that select games in the Low-A Southeast will use a robot to help call balls and strikes. The use of the technology, called the Automatic Ball-Strike System, will also "ensure a consistent strike zone is called, and determine the optimal strike zone for the system," according to MLB. The robot's use is one of a number of experimental rules announced Thursday, which the league said are "designed to increase action on the basepaths, create more balls in play, improve the pace and length of games, and reduce player injuries." MLB has often tried out rules in the minor leagues it is considering for the majors.


Twins, Pirates game delayed by drone flying over Target Field

FOX News

How can teams protect players and staff? A drone flew over Target Field prior to the start of a Minnesota Twins and Pittsburgh Pirates game on Tuesday, which forced a delay. According to The Athletic, players were trying to throw baseballs at the drone, but they were unable to hit it. Eventually, it flew out of the stadium, and around one of the parking lots. The umpires made the players get off the field because the drone presents a safety issue.


Meet White Castle's new robot chef, Flippy

Mashable

Move over human grill cooks, White Castle is teaming up with Miso Robotics to test an automated sous-chef. The aptly named Flippy--an AI-enabled kitchen assistant--is set to join the staff at a Chicago-area burger joint for a trial run that could usher in a new era of robot hash slingers. Since its unveiling in 2018, Flippy has cooked more than 40,000 pounds of fried food--including 9,000 sandwiches at LA's Dodger Stadium, the Arizona Diamondbacks' Chase Field, and two CaliBurger locations, where it works alongside humans to increase productivity and consistency. "I think automation is here to stay and this is the first example of a really large credible player starting down that journey," Miso Robotics CEO Buck Jordan told TechCrunch of the White Castle collab. Engineers are working to install the latest version of Flippy at an undisclosed location in Chicago, where the mechanical fry cook will be integrated into the restaurant's point-of-sale system, allowing it to get to work as soon as an order is placed.