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5 Ways Artificial Intelligence Will Forever Change The Battlefield

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Anyone with a wet finger in the air has by now heard that Google is facing an identity crisis because of its links to the American military. To crudely summarise, Google chose not to renew its "Project Maven" contract to provide artificial intelligence (A.I) capabilities to the U.S. Department of Defense after employee dissent reached a boiling point. This is an issue for Google, as the "Do No Evil" company is currently in an arm-wrestling match with Amazon and Microsoft for some juicy Cloud and A.I government contracts worth around $10B. Rejecting such work would deprive Google of a potentially huge business; in fact, Amazon recently advertised its image recognition software "Rekognition for defense", and Microsoft has touted the fact that its cloud technology is currently used to handle classified information within every branch of the American military. Nevertheless, the nature of the company's culture means that proceeding with big defence contracts could drive A.I experts away from Google.


US Army researchers are developing muscle-bound, Terminator-like war robots that have living tissue

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Combining living tissue with cold metal robots may sound like a plot from the James Cameron film'Terminator,' but the idea is being developed for real-world machines at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). The US military group is working on a series of'biohybrid robotics' that integrates living organisms into mechanical systems that'produces never-seen-before agility and versatile.' The team envisions growing muscle tissue in a lab that would be added to robotic joints in place of traditional actuators – components responsible for moving and controlling mechanisms. The project aims to give robots the same agility and precision that muscles offer biological systems, allowing these futuristic machines to venture into spaces too risky for human soldiers. The US military group is working on a series of'biohybrid robotics' that integrates living organisms into mechanical systems that'produces never-seen-before agility and versatile.'


The US Army is developing a nightmarish thermal facial recognition system

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The US Army just took a giant step toward developing killer robots that can see and identify faces in the dark. DEVCOM, the US Army's corporate research department, last week published a pre-print paper documenting the development of an image database for training AI to perform facial recognition using thermal images. Why this matters: Robots can use night vision optics to effectively see in the dark, but to date there's been no method by which they can be trained to identify surveillance targets using only thermal imagery. This database, made up of hundreds of thousands of images consisting of regular light pictures of people and their corresponding thermal images, aims to change that. How it works: Much like any other facial recognition system, an AI would be trained to categorize images using a specific number of parameters.


US Army's heavy ground robot reaches full-rate production

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WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Army's heavy common ground robot has reached full-rate production, less than a year after FLIR won the contract to deliver the system, FLIR's vice president in charge of unmanned ground systems told Defense News in an interview this month. "We've progressed with the U.S. Army through all the milestones on the program and are now at full-rate production on the program. We're building systems, we're delivering them, there are systems out at Fort Leonard Wood right now going through training with troops and there are more systems in the pipeline to be delivered all the way through next year and further," Tom Frost said. "I think what's remarkable is how quickly the Army was able to run a program to find a very capable, large [explosive ordnance disposal] robot and then get it out to troops as quickly as they did," he added. The service award FLIR an Other Transaction Authority type contract in November 2019 to provide its Kobra robot to serve as its Common Robotic System-Heavy -- or CRS-H.


US Army readies robot tanks fitted with chainguns, missile launchers

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In the near futures, the U.S. Army plans to deploy packs of semi-autonomous robot tanks armed to the brim with chainguns, missiles, and other fearsome weaponry. Two classes of these Robotic Combat Vehicles (RCVs) are already under development, Breaking Defense reports, with a third on the way. As they make their way to future battlefields, Major Corey Wallace explained at a conference last week, they'll be used to lead the charge in both conventional and electronic warfare in the years to come. The U.S. Army is building RCV lights, mediums, and heavies. Respectively, the three are lightweight scouting vehicles, heavily armed mini tanks, and powerful artillery vehicles.


QinetiQ and Pratt Miller Deliver First Robotic Combat Vehicle – Light to U.S. Army – IAM Network

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The first RCV-L was delivered to GVSC on November 5, 2020. The RCV-L, provided by the team of QinetiQ Inc. (QinetiQ) and Pratt Miller Defense (Pratt Miller), is the first of four systems to be delivered. The culmination of eight months of challenging work, this on-time delivery is a major milestone for the RCV program's industry/government collaboration. Michael Rose; Branch Chief for Robotic Combat Platforms, GVSC Ground Vehicle Robotics; shared the following after the delivery took place. "The delivery of the first RCV-L is an exciting result of numerous government organizations and industry working together to achieve our first combat ready robotic vehicle. This unit is the first of four vehicles developed in support of the Manned-Unmanned Teaming (MUM-T) Soldier Operational Experiment, planned for 2022, and represents a significant milestone for the program. QinetiQ and Pratt Miller have successfully developed and delivered these systems within budget and on-schedule even in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. The GVSC team now plans to add Autonomous Mobility as well as Government Furnished Software for the Tethered UAS Multi-Mission Payload and CROWS-J Lethality package."


Robot soldiers could soon make up a quarter of the army

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In the age of artificial intelligence, robots will soon represent a large part of the armed forces, according to the UK's chief of the defence staff Nick Carter, who predicted that up to a quarter of the army could be made up of autonomous systems in the near future. Speaking on Sky News for Remembrance Day, the general speculated that as cyber and space join the more traditional army domains of land, air, and maritime, so will AI systems become an integral part of the armed forces' modernization effort. Carter warned that decisions haven't been taken yet, and insisted that his predictions were not based on firm targets. He nevertheless shared his visions for an armed force that is "designed for the 2030s". SEE: An IT pro's guide to robotic process automation (free PDF) (TechRepublic) "You'll see armed forces that are designed to do (cyber and space). And I think it absolutely means we'll have all manner of different people employed because those domains require different skill sets, and we will absolutely avail ourselves with autonomous platforms and robotics wherever we can," said Carter.


Robots soldiers could soon make up a quarter of the army

ZDNet

In the age of artificial intelligence, robots will soon represent a large part of the armed forces, according to the UK's chief of the defence staff Nick Carter, who predicted that up to a quarter of the army could be made up of autonomous systems in the near future. Speaking on Sky News for Remembrance Day, the general speculated that as cyber and space join the more traditional army domains of land, air, and maritime, so will AI systems become an integral part of the armed forces' modernization effort. Carter warned that decisions haven't been taken yet, and insisted that his predictions were not based on firm targets. He nevertheless shared his visions for an armed force that is "designed for the 2030s". "You'll see armed forces that are designed to do (cyber and space). And I think it absolutely means we'll have all manner of different people employed because those domains require different skill sets, and we will absolutely avail ourselves with autonomous platforms and robotics wherever we can," said Carter.


Army fires tank-killing robots armed with Javelin missiles

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. The U.S. Army will soon operate robots able to destroy enemy armored vehicles with anti-tank missiles, surveil warzones under heavy enemy fire and beam back identified targeting details in seconds due to rapid progress with several new armed robot programs. Several of the new platforms now operate with a Kongsberg-built first-of-its-kind wireless fire control architecture for a robotic armored turret with machine guns, Javelin Anti-Tank Missiles and robot-mounted 30mm cannon selected by the Army to arm its fast-emerging Robotic Combat Vehicles. These now-in-development robotic systems are intended to network with manned vehicles in high-risk combat operations.


With artificial intelligence, every soldier is a counter-drone operator

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With the addition of artificial intelligence and machine learning, the aim is to make every soldier, regardless of job specialty, capable of identifying and knocking down threatening drones. While much of that mission used to reside mostly in the air defense community, those attacks can strike any infantry squad or tank battalion. The goal is to reduce cognitive burden and operator stress when dealing with an array of aerial threats that now plague units of any size, in any theater. "Everyone is counter-UAS," said Col. Marc Pelini, division chief for capabilities and requirements at the Joint Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office, or JCO. Army units aren't ready to defeat aerial drones, the study shows.