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Toyota's basketball robot stuns at the Tokyo Olympics with its flick of the wrist

Washington Post - Technology News

While CUE is experiencing a moment in the spotlight, the robot isn't the best three-point shooter the world has ever known. American podiatrist Tom Amberry set the world record for humans, 2,750 consecutive shots, in 1993 at age 71. Ted St. Martin of Jacksonville, Fla., pushed the consecutive mark to 5,221 in 1996 and still holds the record today. Others have achieved a number of basketball shooting feats, some while blindfolded.


The future of sports? There's a robot sinking basketballs at the Tokyo Olympics.

Mashable

The Tokyo Olympics are in full swing, as anyone who has the ability to set the TV channel to NBC is no doubt aware. And while the biennial showdown between world-class athletes and the nations they represent is entirely a celebration of human excellence, in 2021 at least one robot is being allowed to have a little fun, as a treat. Fresh from the Tokyo Olympics Twitter account we have this clip of a tiny-headed robot -- WHY IS ITS HEAD SO SMALL, Mashable's EiC asked in Slack -- shooting, and sinking, free throws Look at this mad nonsense. Nothing but net! (The robot moved further back right after this and immediately sunk a three-point shot with ease as well.) Why is this robot wearing a jersey with the number 95 on it?


Tokyo Olympics robot impresses with impeccable shooting during US-France halftime

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. The Tokyo Olympics men's basketball matchup between the U.S. and France was briefly overshadowed by a robot at halftime. The robot was spotted at the foul line taking almost as long as NBA champion Giannis Antetokounmpo to shoot, but the machine made the basket. The robot was then placed at the top of the three-point arch and shot the ball with as much precision as Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry.


Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony included a light display with 1,800 drones

Engadget

There may not have been any fans in the Olympic Stadium, but Japan still found a way to put on a show for the opening of the 2020 Summer Games. The host country charmed early with the parade of nations, which featured an orchestrated video game soundtrack, and then showed off the type of creativity it's known for with a performance involving the Olympic pictograms. But Tokyo saved the biggest spectacle for last. Towards the end of the ceremony, a fleet of 1,824 drones took to the skies above the Olympic Stadium. Initially arrayed in the symbol of the 2020 Games, they then took on the shape of the Earth before a rendition of John Lenon's "Imagine," which was reworked by Hans Zimmer for the Olympics, played across the stadium.


Intel's Mobileye takes its autonomous vehicle testing program to New York City – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Mobileye, a subsidiary of Intel, has expanded its autonomous vehicle testing program to New York City as part of its strategy to develop and deploy the technology. New York City joins a number of other cities, including Detroit, Paris, Shanghai and Tokyo, where Mobileye has either launched testing or plans to this year. Mobileye launched its first test fleet in Jerusalem in 2018 and added one in Munich in 2020. "If we want to build something that will scale, we need to be able to drive in challenging places and almost everywhere," Mobileye president and CEO Amnon Shashua said during a presentation Tuesday that was streamed live. As part of the announcement, Mobileye also released a 40-minute unedited video of one of its test vehicles equipped with a self-driving system navigating New York's city streets.


LiDAR - Lighting The Path From IoT To AoT (Autonomy Of Things)

#artificialintelligence

Japanese auto giant Toyota Motor unveils their new violin-playing robot at the company's showroom in ... [ ] Tokyo, 06 December 2007. Toyota unveiled three mobile robots, one called a "partner robot", one that plays the violin and a third which can transport a passenger with two wheels. IoT or the Internet of Things has been widely deployed in the past decade as sensors became smarter, machine learning proliferated and advanced, access to WiFi, Bluetooth and other wireless communications became prevalent, and cloud storage and computing technologies matured. In general, IoT achieved intelligent networking of "things" that were typically static or stationary, through movement of data. The ongoing and imminent revolution is in the Autonomy of Things or AoT - which for purposes of this article is defined as autonomous movement of "things" or robots, either in public (mostly uncontrolled), semi-public (somewhat controlled, includes outer space) or private (highly controlled) spaces.


Meet the army of robots that will help run the Tokyo Games

The Independent - Tech

The Olympic Games may be taking place a year late because of the pandemic, but it will still be a chance for host nation Japan to show off its world-class robotics technology. And despite spectators being kept away from the events by Covid restrictions, there will still be a string of robotic participants to help run the Tokyo Games. Japanese automaker Toyota has developed a suite of robots that will be deployed at the Games, but which are designed to show off their wider everyday applications. "The Tokyo 2020 Games are a unique opportunity for us to display Japanese robot technology," said Hirohisa Hirukawa, who is the leader of the Tokyo 2020 Robot Project. "This project will not simply be about exhibiting robots, but showcasing their practical real-life deployment helping people.


Humans Prefer To Interact With Human-Like Robots, Research Finds

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Riken, Japan, have gained new insight into how we perceive and interact with the voice of various machines. The team performed a meta-synthesis, and their findings provide new information about human preferences, which engineers and designers can use to develop future voice technologies.


The Roaring 2020s: A Booming Decade May Follow Covid-19

#artificialintelligence

Will a boom follow Covid-19? A century ago the 1920s saw creative energies explode after the tragedies of the Spanish Flu and World War I. In big cities such as New York, London, Shanghai, Sydney and Tokyo, economic growth was palpable. New technologies such as cars and radios became common. So did a risk-on optimism.


Humanoid Robot Keeps Getting Fired From His Jobs

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

TOKYO--Having a robot read scripture to mourners seemed like a cost-effective idea to the people at Nissei Eco Co., a plastics manufacturer with a sideline in the funeral business. The company hired child-sized robot Pepper, clothed it in the vestments of Buddhist clergy and programmed it to chant several sutras, or Buddhist scriptures, depending on the sect of the deceased. Alas, the robot, made by SoftBank Group Corp., kept breaking down during practice runs. "What if it refused to operate in the middle of a ceremony?" said funeral-business manager Osamu Funaki. "It would be such a disaster."