Robots


Marines' new Switchblade drones will unleash lethal mini missiles

FOX News

Marines will soon be even more deadly - and safer - with their new extremely lethal Switchblades. When you think of a switchblade, you think of a smallish knife that fits in a pocket, right? Marines will soon have in their hands entirely different breed of Switchblades – these are smart, flying little drones loaded with devastating miniature missiles. Tiny, fast and very quiet, they are extremely difficult for adversaries to detect or track. Even if an adversary does spot the drone, it doesn't matter.


Army builds robot attack tanks and ground war drones

FOX News

File photo - Troopers with the U.S. Army 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division fire the main gun round at a target during unit gunnery practice with newly acquired M1A1-SA Abrams tanks at Fort Stewart, Georgia, U.S. March 29, 2018. Picture taken March 29, 2018. The Army is engineering high-tech autonomy kits designed to give "robot" tanks and other armored combat vehicles an ability to operate with little or no human intervention, bringing new tactical and operational dimensions to the future of ground combat. Unmanned systems, utilized in a fast-evolving, high-threat ground combat operation, could enable robot vehicles to carry supplies, test enemy defenses and even fire weapons – all while manned vehicles operate at a safer distance. "A kit of hardware and software can be installed into different ground platforms to increase the level of autonomy," Osie David, Chief Engineer for Mission Command, Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, told Warrior Maven in an interview.


NTSB report says self-driving Uber saw pedestrian 6 seconds before deadly crash

FOX News

Raw video: Cameras mounted inside the car catches the fatal moment. Authorites are investigating the cause of the crash. The self-driving Uber SUV that struck and killed Elaine Herzberg in Tempe, Ariz., in March picked her up on its sensors six seconds before it hit her, but did not determine that it needed to stop or evade her until it was too late, according to federal investigators. Herzberg was jaywalking her bicycle across a four-lane section of road on the night of March 18 when the Volvo XC90 SUV ran into her. A preliminary report on the accident from the National Transportation Safety Board issued on Thursday said that a review of the data from the car shows that it first identified her as an unknown object, then as a vehicle and finally as a bicycle.


Uber announces end of self-driving car operations in Arizona

FOX News

Raw video: Cameras mounted inside the car catches the fatal moment. Authorites are investigating the cause of the crash. Uber is shutting down its self-driving car operations in Arizona, but plans to continue the development of autonomous cars in other states. "We're committed to self-driving technology, and we look forward to returning to public roads in the near future. In the meantime, we remain focused on our top-to-bottom safety review, having brought on former NTSB Chair Christopher Hart to advise us on our overall safety culture," an Uber spokesperson told Fox News.


Autonomous vehicle helped locate 'holy grail of shipwrecks' off Colombia

FOX News

San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle An autonomous vehicle was used in 2015 to locate a Spanish galleon that sunk 300 years ago off the coast of Colombia with $17 billion in treasure, the research team that helped in the discovery said on Monday. The San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The institution said it was holding the discovery under wraps out of respect for the Colombian government. REMUS 6000 being deployed off the Colombian Navy research ship ARC Malpelo. The treasure--which includes of gold, silver and emeralds-- has been the subject of legal battles between several nations as well as private companies.


Wireless 'robofly' looks like an Insect, gets its power from lasers

FOX News

RoboFly is only slightly bigger than a real fly. A new type of flying robot is so tiny and lightweight -- it weighs about as much as a toothpick -- it can perch on your finger. The little flitter is also capable of untethered flight and is powered by lasers. This is a big leap forward in the design of diminutive airborne bots, which are usually too small to support a power source and must trail a lifeline to a distant battery in order to fly, engineers who built the new robot announced in a statement. Their insect-inspired creation is dubbed RoboFly, and like its animal namesake, it sports a pair of delicate, transparent wings that carry it into the air.


Niger drone video shows US forces fighting for their lives

FOX News

WASHINGTON – Dramatic new drone video of the Niger ambush that killed four American soldiers shows U.S. forces desperately trying to escape and fighting for their lives after friendly Nigerien forces mistook them for the enemy. It describes how the fleeing troops set up a quick defensive location on the edge of a swamp and -- thinking they were soon to die -- wrote messages home to their loved ones. The video, released by the Pentagon with explanatory narration, includes more than 10 minutes of drone footage, file tape and animation that wasn't made public last week when the military released a portion of the final report on the October attack. The video depicts for the first time the harrowing hours as troops held off their enemy and waited for rescue. There were 46 U.S. and Nigerien troops out on the initial mission in the west African nation, going after but failing to find a high-value militant, then collecting intelligence at a site where the insurgent had been.


US Army starts work on future attack-recon helicopter

FOX News

The Army is now crafting early requirements for what is expected to be a new attack helicopter -- beyond the Apache -- with superior weapons, speed, maneuverability, sensor technology and vastly-improved close-combat attack capability. "We know that in the future we are going to need to have a lethal capability, which drives us to a future attack reconnaissance platform. The Apache is the world's greatest but there will come a time when we look at leap ahead technology," Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville told a small group of reporters. A future attack-reconnaissance helicopter, now in its conceptual phase, is a key part of a wide-spanning, multi-aircraft Army Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program. FVL seeks a family of next-generation aircraft to begin emerging in the 2030s, consisting of attack, utility and heavy-class air assets.


Man claims Wizarding World of Harry Potter ride left him with spinal injuries, sues Universal

FOX News

Tristram Buckley says the benches in the Forbidden Journey ride gave him "shaken adult syndrome." It's safe to say Tristram Buckley wasn't swept up in the magic of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. Buckley, a former visitor to the Universal Studios Hollywood location of the Potter-themed park, claims in a new lawsuit that one of the rides -- Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey -- left him in pain after causing severe injury to his spine, TMZ reported Monday. According to the suit, Buckley took a seat on the ride's Enchanted Bench, which is suspended from a mechanical arm that moves along a track. The seats also pivot and sway to give riders the sensation of flying through the scenarios presented on a wrap-around screen.


Sony sells thousands of Aibo robot dogs as it considers US launch

FOX News

Sony Corp's entertainment robot "aibo" is pictured at its demonstration in Tokyo, Japan November 1, 2017. Sony's robotic pet is proving popular with dog-loving tech fans … or is that tech-loving dog fans? The latest version of Aibo launched in Japan in January, with the electronics company this week revealing the highly specific sales figure for the device -- 11,111 units -- for the first three months of this year. Aibo is currently only available in Japan, though Sony says it's considering taking it to the American and Chinese markets, too. It hopes the device can act as a companion for people who might not have the time or means to care for a real dog.