Robots


Learning and Executing Generalized Robot Plans '

Classics (Collection 2)

In this paper we describe some major new additions to the STRIPS robot problem-solving system. The first addition is a process for generalizing a plan produced by STRIPS so that problem-specific constants appearing in the plan are replaced by problem-independent parameters. The generalized plan, stored in a convenient format called a triangle table, has two important functions. The more obvious function is as a single macro action that can be used by STRIPS-- either in whole or in part--during the solution of a subsequent problem. Perhaps less obviously, the generalized plan also plays a central part in the process that monitors the real-world execution of a plan, and allows the robot to react "intelligently" to unexpected consequences of actions.


OGS14.pdf

Classics (Collection 2)

THE PERCEIVING ROBOT: WHAT DOES IT SEE? WHAT DOES IT DO? Oliver G. Selfridge Judy A. Franklin The Perceiving Robot: What Does It See? What Does It Do? by Oliver G. Selfridge and Judy A. Franklin - - The Perceiving Robot: What Does It See? What Does It Do? Oliver G. Selfridge & Judy A. Franklin GTE Laboratories We examine the nature of robots in the future, and propose that their role is fundamentally to be responsible agents for people, and not mere programmed artifacts. That means that besides extended powers of perception, they will need to deal with their own purposes--embedded in purpose structures--and the ways to modify and optimize their purposes in parallel. The primary purpose of robotic perception is to see how well the robot is performing on a current task (or subtask).


25 The Mark 1.5 Edinburgh Robot Facility

Classics (Collection 2)

In May 1971 the Mark 1.5 Edinburgh robot system went online as a complete hand-eye system. Two years earlier the Mark 1 device had been connected to the ic L 4130 computer of the Department of Machine Intelligence and Perception. The present equipment thus represents a useable system, not yet up to full Mark 2 specification, but considerably more useful than the Mark 1. It is important that the complete system should be as self-reliant as possible. If it depends much upon human assistance to pre-process information or to put things right when they go astray, it is all too easy in one's research to avoid the central issues of a problem, and produce a'solution' which does not survive when confronted by real situations.


Ethical machines

Classics (Collection 2)

The notion of an ethical machine can be interpreted in more than one way. Perhaps the most important interpretation is a machine that can generalize from existing literature to infer one or more consistent ethical systems and can work out their consequences. An ultra-intelligent machine should be able to do this, and that is one reason for not fearing it. There is fear that'the machine will become the master', especially compounded by the possibility that the machine will go wrong. There is, for example, a play by E. M. Foster based on this theme.


I11 311

Classics (Collection 2)

A "how/ why" diagram of solutions and rationale for a design problem involving a need to grasp a wide range of parts. BIBLIOGRAPHY ulation and Recognition," submitted to Robotic Review (May 1990). This material is reproduced with permission of John Wiley & Sons, Inc." ROBOTICS The objective of this article is to survey the state of the art of intelligent robots. By way of introduction, the terms robot and artificial intelligence are defined, intelligent robots are classified according to their level of intelligence, social and technoeconomic incentives for the development of intelligent robots are discussed, and the article touches Oil the socioeconomic impacts of this development. Past accomplishments and present issues in major robotics research areas are covered.