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Amazon's iRobot Deal Would Give It Maps Inside Millions of Homes

WIRED

After decades of creating war machines and home cleaning appliances, iRobot agreed to be acquired by Amazon for $1.7 billion, according to a joint statement by the two companies. If the deal goes through, it would give Amazon access to yet another wellspring of personal data: interior maps of Roomba owners' homes. Those Roombas work in part by using sensors to map the homes they operate in. In a 2017 Reuters interview, iRobot CEO Colin Angle suggested the company might someday share that data with tech companies developing smart home devices and AI assistants. Amazon declined to respond to questions about how it would use that data, but combined with other recent acquisition targets, the company could wind up with a comprehensive look at what's happening inside people's homes.


Amazon vacuums up Roomba maker iRobot, sparking immediate privacy concerns

Mashable

Would you give Amazon the layout to your home? Well, you soon may not have a choice if you're a Roomba customer. In a statement released on Friday, the e-commerce giant announced it was acquiring iRobot, the company best known as the maker of the popular vacuuming robot, Roomba. Amazon will purchase the consumer robot company in an all-cash deal for around $1.7 billion. The deal, however, still needs to be approved by regulators.


Amazon to buy vacuum maker iRobot for roughly $1.7B

Associated Press

Amazon on Friday announced it has agreed to acquire the vacuum cleaner maker iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion, scooping up another company to add to its collection of smart home appliances amid broader concerns about its market power. The move is part of Amazon's bid to own part of the home space through services and accelerate its growth beyond retail, said Neil Saunders, managing director at GlobalData Retail. A slew of home-cleaning robots adds to the company's tech arsenal, making it more involved in consumer's lives beyond static things like voice control. Amazon's Astro robot, which helps with tasks like setting an alarm, was unveiled last year at an introductory price of $1,000. But its rollout has been limited and has received a lackluster response.


Amazon to Buy Roomba Maker iRobot for Roughly $1.7B

TIME - Tech

Amazon on Friday announced it has agreed to acquire the vacuum cleaner maker iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion, scooping up another company to add to its collection of smart home appliances amid broader concerns about its market power. The move is part of Amazon's bid to own part of the home space through services and accelerate its growth beyond retail, said Neil Saunders, managing director at GlobalData Retail. A slew of home-cleaning robots adds to the company's tech arsenal, making it more involved in consumer's lives beyond static things like voice control. Amazon's Astro robot, which helps with tasks like setting an alarm, was unveiled last year at an introductory price of $1,000. But its rollout has been limited and has received a lackluster response.


Amazon agrees to buy Roomba maker iRobot for $1.7bn

The Guardian

Amazon announced it has agreed to acquire the vacuum cleaner maker iRobot for approximately $1.7bn, scooping up another company to add to its collection of smart home appliances amid broader concerns about its market power. The acquisition, announced on Friday, is part of Amazon's bid to own part of the home space through services and accelerate its growth beyond retail, said Neil Saunders, managing director at GlobalData Retail. The appliance would join the voice assistant Alexa, the Astro robot and Ring security cameras and others in the list of smart home features offered by the Seattle-based e-commerce and tech giant. So far, Amazon has not had much success with household robots. The company's Astro robot, which helps with tasks like setting an alarm, was unveiled last year at an introductory price of $1,000.


Amazon is buying Roomba vacuum maker iRobot for $1.7 billion

NPR Technology

An iRobot Terra lawn mower is shown in Bedford, Mass., on Jan. 16, 2019. Amazon on Friday announced an agreement to acquire iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion. An iRobot Terra lawn mower is shown in Bedford, Mass., on Jan. 16, 2019. Amazon on Friday announced an agreement to acquire iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion. NEW YORK -- Amazon on Friday announced it has agreed to acquire the vacuum cleaner maker iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion, scooping up another company to add to its collection of smart home appliances amid broader concerns about its market power.


Three opportunities of Digital Transformation: AI, IoT and Blockchain

#artificialintelligence

Koomey's law This law posits that the energy efficiency of computation doubles roughly every one-and-a-half years (see Figure 1–7). In other words, the energy necessary for the same amount of computation halves in that time span. To visualize the exponential impact this has, consider the face that a fully charged MacBook Air, when applying the energy efficiency of computation of 1992, would completely drain its battery in a mere 1.5 seconds. According to Koomey's law, the energy requirements for computation in embedded devices is shrinking to the point that harvesting the required energy from ambient sources like solar power and thermal energy should suffice to power the computation necessary in many applications. Metcalfe's law This law has nothing to do with chips, but all to do with connectivity. Formulated by Robert Metcalfe as he invented Ethernet, the law essentially states that the value of a network increases exponentially with regard to the number of its nodes (see Figure 1–8).


Top 15 Best Technology Trends 2022

#artificialintelligence

There will be a lot of technology trends to follow in 2022 and they will affect different industries and different aspects of our lives. A lot of these trends are already at play, but some will take time to come to the fore. In this blog, we will look at these trends and predict what they might mean for our lives in the years to come. Technology is a fast-paced industry and there is a lot of buzzes. Everyone is talking about the latest trends, from the latest app to the latest technology.


The Future Of Retail:10 Years from now

#artificialintelligence

I took a dive into recent history, and read an article written by Lin Grossman from about 4 years ago. How did the future look like before Covid-19 when our reality was just a science fiction saga. So we are not yet blessed by two hours delivery by drones, and physical storefronts are still out there (though we do not visit them as much), and regretfully the virtual fitting room is not yet commercial. But I share the same vision as The Futurist Faith Popcorn and "Given retail's steady migration to mobile and e-commerce, you may be wondering what retail will look like in the future". As predicted by futurist Faith Popcorn, we can continue to expect hyper-customized concierge and on-demand services, and what the writer calls "consutainment," the integration of ultra-convenience, consumption, and entertainment.


Five IoT trends to watch for in 2021 - TechHQ Latest

#artificialintelligence

As we approach the close of a whirlwind 2020, connected devices will continue to define numerous industries in the coming year. The Internet of Things (IoT) adoption has remained a gamechanger for businesses this year and inevitably will continue to redefine operations as industries evolve from the pandemic-induced challenges and step into 2021. Several trends are expected to continue to gather momentum, fueling IoT's prominence in 2021, from data-intensive experiences that use IoT devices such as self-driving cars or wearable devices, to basic health-and-safety needs as Covid-19 continues to take center stage. At the same time, the IoT landscape remains fragmented, and the fragmentation will continue, predicted Forrester Research and connectivity options will be diverse rather than standardized. While 5G has been touted as the holy grail for IoT, "there will be a variety of connectivity options," said Forrester senior analyst Michele Pelino.