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Automotive Artificial Intelligence Market to Reach $26.5 Billion by 2025 - Novus Light Today

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The automotive industry is among the sectors at the forefront of using artificial intelligence (AI) to mimic, augment and support the actions of humans, while simultaneously leveraging the advanced reaction times and pinpoint precision of machine-based systems. Indeed, today's semi-autonomous vehicles and the fully autonomous vehicles of the future will rely heavily on AI systems. However, according to a new report from Tractica, while autonomous driving will be a leading impetus for AI spending in the automotive industry, the use cases for AI in vehicles are in fact much broader. Key applications encompass automotive human machine interaction (HMI) functionality like voice/speech recognition, driver face analytics, emotion recognition and gesture recognition; maintenance and safety applications like predictive maintenance, automated on-road customer service and vehicle network and data security; and personalized services in cars, among many others. All told, across 15 such AI use cases, Tractica forecasts that revenue from automotive AI software, hardware and services will increase from $2.0 billion in 2018 to $26.5 billion by 2025, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 46.9%.


Self-driving cars will be safe, we're testing them in a massive AI Sim

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The British government this week unveiled plans for an ambitious AI simulator to be used to test self-driving cars. It's part of a stated mission to make the UK the world's leading destination for testing autonomous vehicles. The simulator, called OmniCAV, recreates a virtual version of 32km of Oxfordshire roads. "It's a synthetic digital model of the real world," Mark Stileman, bid manager at one of the partners involved, Ordnance Survey, told us. The OS already knows where a lot things are, and the sim adds "feature classification and retrieval" of road furnitures like gantries and white lines, and crucially, road intersections.


Remember the driver disguised as a car seat? That helped Ford develop a self-driving 'language.'

Mashable

That man who dressed as a car seat to make it look like he was in a self-driving car last year was, in fact, not a terrible Halloween costume, but part of a study for Ford's self-driving cars. At the time, pesky reporters quickly uncovered that the disguised driver was with the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. Now we also know that that covert driving attire was to help Ford's self-driving car team shape a "common language" for cars to "talk" to pedestrians and other people on the road. This all came out this week when Ford released its self-driving safety report, in which it explained how the "simulated" autonomous experiences with the disguised driver in a seat suit led to its windshield light bar, which lights up with different patterns to show what it the car is doing. A back-and-forth white light means the car is yielding.


Is New Zealand prepared for artificial intelligence on its roads and infrastructure?

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The Herald spoke to industry leaders Mahmood Hikmet, R&D Coordinator, Ohmio; Matthew Ensor, Business Director - Advisory, Beca Diane Edwards, General Manager People, Systems and Technology, Ports of Auckland; Ben Reid, Executive Director, AI Forum NZ and Coby Duggan, General Manager, Volvo New Zealand to understand the AI opportunities for New Zealand, and what it could mean for the future of our roads and infrastructure. It's already out there and has been for decades! There is so much artificial intelligence already around you and not just on the roads. Ensor: It is hard to prepare when there is so much uncertainty around what changes artificial intelligence will create. We need to wait before making bets on which emerging technologies will dominate.


Tesla Says Its New Self-Driving Chip Is Finally Baked

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Tesla's Model S sedan, the car company's flagship vehicle, was first shown as a prototype in 2009, has been on sale since 2012, and, barring one small change to remove the fake grille at the front, has looked exactly the same for nearly a decade. This is notable because most manufacturers fully redesign their cars every four to six years to keep them fresh--and to keep buyers buying. For Tesla, tech upgrades are the selling point. The company pushes software updates several times a year, adding features like summon, where a car pulls in and out of a garage with nobody inside, or camper-mode, for sleeping in the car with the heating on. Tesla's biggest claim is that one day, all the cars it's currently building will be capable of full-self driving.


4 Ways Drones are Being Used in Maritime and Offshore Services

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Predictions about the billions of dollars that drone technology represents are as pervasive as they are extreme. Drone industry experts are currently tracking over 75 firms that offer drone market reports or forecasts of some type, all of which offer various opinions and numbers around what sort of an impact the technology will enable in industries like construction and agriculture as well as maritime and offshore services. It's easy and in some cases justified to get excited about the potential of the technology, but many of these predictions are based on how the drones might be utilized, as opposed to the difference they're actually making. It's why figuring out the ROI of UAVs is a key consideration when it comes to adoption, and it's why the current applications of drones in maritime and offshore services are so important to consider. The use cases of today are what will make some of those billion dollar predictions possible, and makes it essential to see these uses explored in depth and detail at industry events.


Semi-Autonomous Cars Have Flaws. That's Why They Need Tests

WIRED

These days, modern cars come with sophisticated driver assistance tools, like adaptive cruise control, which maintains a set distance from the car in front, and active steering, which keeps a vehicle in its lane. They can also brake automatically if the driver doesn't spot a stopped object ahead, and warn when there's a motorbike hovering in a driver's blind spot. These features are the start of the promise of our autonomous future, where cars will drive themselves and we will be but passengers in a self-driving world. But they're still being refined and developed--and are at different stages of capabilities. In a series of road tests with five high-end cars, including two Teslas, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety found that "some systems handled some situations better than others," according to chief research officer David Zuby.


Global Bigdata Conference

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Automakers, insurers, and related partners see a big role for blockchain. What will change in the realms of payments, insurance, security, and safety? When it comes to cars and blockchain, no one has all the answers yet. But there is plenty to prepare for and think about – not only in the auto industry but also in related industries such as insurance. First things first: While we have found interesting examples of blockchain in action, most companies and industries remain in an early stage of exploration and adoption.


Worries Mount Over Ability to Weaponize Drones

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Drone industry and law-enforcement officials are struggling to find common ground over expanding flights and protecting public safety, a debate thrust into the public spotlight by a reported assassination attempt on Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. The Federal Aviation Administration is projecting a fourfold increase, from more than 110,000 currently, in the number of commercial drones flying in U.S. skies in the next five years. U.S. law-enforcement officials, however, want to delay widespread operations until reliable defensive systems are developed. Saturday's attack with unmanned aircraft in Caracas was a reminder for the drone industry and U.S. government officials over the potential security threats even readily available commercial drones can pose. Venezuelan authorities said a pair of explosive-laden drones carrying a total of about 4 pounds of plastic explosives were part of an unsuccessful assassination attempt during an outdoor ceremony in Caracas, with one of the vehicles detonating after government jamming devices knocked it off course.


Tesla Says Its New Self-Driving Chip Is Finally Baked

WIRED

Tesla's Model S sedan, the car company's flagship vehicle, was first shown as a prototype in 2009, has been on sale since 2012, and, barring one small change to remove the fake grille at the front, has looked exactly the same for nearly a decade. This is notable because most manufacturers fully redesign their cars every four to six years to keep them fresh--and to keep buyers buying. For Tesla, tech upgrades are the selling point. The company pushes software updates several times a year, adding features like summon, where a car pulls in and out of a garage with nobody inside, or camper-mode, for sleeping in the car with the heating on. Tesla's biggest claim is that one day, all the cars it's currently building will be capable of full-self driving.