Robots


More Than 23,000 Robots To Be Deployed PYMNTS.com

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Robots may keep Tesla's CEO up at night, but companies around the globe are interested in putting them to work, according to new research from Tractica. In a press release Tractica, the market intelligence firm, announced its forecast that more than 23,000 robots will be deployed for customer service applications from last year through 2022. During the forecast period, the robots will generate $451 million in revenue. Nearly half of all the customer service robots will be found in Asia Pacific, but there will also be growth in the U.S. and Europe. "Fewer than five years ago, hardly anyone had seen or heard of robots in public and commercial spaces, as most of the developments were restricted to research labs," says research analyst Manoj Sahi in the press release highlighting results of its latest research.


Nvidia CEO: Gaming will be huge, but so will AI and data center businesses

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Nvidia reported a stellar quarter for the three months ended October 31. Nvidia had $2.6 billion in revenue in the quarter, and $1.5 billion of it came from graphics chips for gaming PCs. But the company's investment in artificial intelligence chips is paying off, with data center growing beyond $500 million in revenue for the first time. Jensen Huang, CEO of Santa Clara, California-based Nvidia, said his company started investing in AI seven years ago, and that its latest AI chips are the result of years of work by several thousand engineers. That has given the company an edge in AI, and other rivals are scrambling to keep up, he said.


Google's AI guru predicts humans and machines will merge within 20 years

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Public perception of artificial intelligence technology, in 2017, seems to lie somewhere at the intersection of existential fear and cautious optimism. Yet there's a growing movement of people who believe AI is crucial to the evolution of our species. These people aren't outsiders or outliers -- they're actually directing research on the cutting edge at companies like Google. Ray Kurzweil, Google's guru of AI and futurism, spoke last week at the Council for Foreign Relations, in an intimate Q&A session. His views on the future of humanity might seem radical to a public that's been cutting its teeth on doomsayer headlines featuring Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking warning about World War III.


Nvidia CEO: Gaming will be huge, but so will AI and data center businesses

#artificialintelligence

Nvidia reported a stellar quarter for the three months ended October 31. Nvidia had $2.6 billion in revenue in the quarter, and $1.5 billion of it came from graphics chips for gaming PCs. But the company's investment in artificial intelligence chips is paying off, with data center growing beyond $500 million in revenue for the first time. Jensen Huang, CEO of Santa Clara, California-based Nvidia, said his company started investing in AI seven years ago, and that its latest AI chips are the result of years of work by several thousand engineers. That has given the company an edge in AI, and other rivals are scrambling to keep up, he said.


NVidia $NVDA Earnings Glow With Machine Learning, AI, Bitcoin & Gaming Graphics

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High-performance graphics chip pioneer NVidia reported better than expected fiscal Q3 earnings after the market close on Thursday. NVidia raised the dividend 7 percent to 15 cents a share and intends to return $1.25 billion to shareholders during the next fiscal year. NVidia consistently trumps analysts' expectations and comes just after Sony and gaming stocks Take Two Interactive $TTWO and Activision Blizzard $ATVI delivered strong earnings. NVIDA chips, graphics processors are gaming industry standouts for personal computers and video game consoles. Earnings: EPS $1.33 way ahead of analysts expected EPS of 94 cents on Revenue of $2.64 Billio beats expected 18% revenue growth to $2.36 billion.. "We had a great quarter across all of our growth drivers.


Renault's self-driving car can avoid obstacles like pro drivers

Engadget

The Renault Group announced today that its autonomous vehicle control system can avoid obstacles just as well as professional test drivers. The company said that in designing the system, it was actually inspired by these drivers' abilities and used them as a sort of benchmark as to what level its technology should be performing. "Despite popular belief, the reality is that human beings are pretty amazing drivers, with less than one fatality per 100,000,000 kilometers in most developed countries," Simon Hougard, director of the Renault Open Innovation Lab, wrote in a Medium post. "Reaching and exceeding that benchmark is essential to improve safety and realize our dreams of autonomous cars, providing more productivity during our morning commutes and robo-vehicle services in city centers." The technology is a result of Renault's collaboration with Stanford University Dynamic Design Lab Director Chris Gerdes, who's also a former US Department of Transportation Chief Innovation Officer, and Renault says it will help with its goal to be one of the first companies to bring "mind off" technology to the public.


AutoNation announces Waymo fleet repair deal, shares jump

Daily Mail

US auto retailer AutoNation Inc announced a multi-year partnership on Thursday to support Alphabet Inc's Waymo self-driving car unit, including vehicle maintenance and repairs as the company adds new brands into its fleet, sending its shares up 13 percent to a high for the year. That news was accompanied by a better-than expected third-quarter profit as AutoNation performed well despite the impact of hurricanes during the quarter. There is fierce competition between large automakers to bring self-driving cars to market first. Lauderdale, Florida-based AutoNation is the latest in a series of recent partnerships the self-driving unit has formed. Google has revealed the self driving minivans it hopes could revolutionize the way we travel.


Tesla reports biggest-ever quarterly loss, Model 3 delays

Daily Mail

Tesla racked up a $619 million loss in the third quarter, its biggest-ever, driving its shares sharply lower as the electric-car maker spends to speed up production of its more affordable Model 3 sedan. The company, led by Silicon Valley star Elon Musk, also confirmed it had missed its Model 3 production goal for the third quarter, producing only 260 vehicles compared to an earlier estimate of 1,500. Its shares fell 5.4 percent in after hours trading. The company said it had $3.53 billion in cash and cash-equivalents as of Sept. 30, compared to $3.04 billion at the end of the second quarter. Tesla said last month it delivered 26,150 vehicles in the third quarter, a 4.5 percent rise on the same period of 2016, but added that "production bottlenecks" had left the company behind its planned ramp-up for the $35,000 Model 3. On Wednesday it said it now hoped to achieve a production rate of 5,000 per month by the end of the first quarter of next year, pushed back from the end of this year.


Sony's Rebooted Robot Dog Will Fetch Ruffly $1,700

Wall Street Journal

Sony shares rose more than 11% on Wednesday to a nine-year-high. The new Aibo features improved artificial intelligence software and enhanced motors and sensors that help the robot better resemble a real dog. The company said each device will develop unique behavior patterns depending on owner interactions and can work with other internet-connected electronics. The Aibo will be released first in Japan and cost ¥198,000 (about $1,700). New owners will also need to pay about $25 a month for cloud services to provide their devices with remote updates for things like teaching the robot new tricks.


There's an Apple-like acquisition trend in the self-driving car space

Mashable

Ford's self-driving car subsidiary Argo AI has acquired Princeton Lightwave, a LiDAR producer, in a move to take ownership of its supply chain, which is becoming more common in the autonomous vehicle (AV) development space. LiDAR, which stands for Light Detection And Ranging, are sensors used by AVs to determine how far away objects are in the world around it to create a 3D map of road conditions. The system works by sending out lightwaves from lasers that bounce off objects before returning to the sensor, similar to how more commonly understood tools like radar and sonar function. Argo AI CEO Bryan Salesky announced the acquisition in a Medium post, calling the sensor tech "crucial" to the development of Argo's autonomous platform. He wrote that the move to bring Princeton onboard makes Argo "uniquely positioned" to build out its hardware and software systems together, which presumably gives the company more direct control over how the platform works as one, along with cutting costs by owning the means of LiDAR production.