Robots



Survey reveals: MP3 is a Star Wars robot and HTML is an STD

ZDNet

No, folks, this is not a gigabyte. Want to get a job in tech? Here are the categories with the highest salaries. In a world where #fakenews is claimed by anyone who doesn't agree with something, it's becoming more and more important to dig deep to find the real truth. This lack of understanding is not limited to the political arena.


AI-powered robot finds common soap ingredient may combat malaria

Engadget

Around half of the world's population is at risk of contracting malaria and it causes around half a million deaths each year. However, the parasites that cause malaria are becoming more resistant to the drugs we currently use to combat them, meaning the global malaria risk stands to increase if we don't develop new drugs quickly enough. Well new research published recently in Scientific Reports finds that a common chemical used in everything from soap and toothpaste to clothing and furniture might be an effective treatment, and it was done with the help of AI. Many popular antimalarial drugs target a specific enzyme found in malaria-causing parasites, an enzyme important for the parasites' growth.


AI robot finds ingredient in toothpaste may help fight malaria

#artificialintelligence

A laboratory robot powered by artificial intelligence (AI) has discovered that a compound commonly found in toothpaste could be used to combat drug-resistant malaria parasites. Triclosan could be deployed against strains of plasmodium malaria parasites that have evolved resistance to the widely used drug pyrimethamine, according to the University of Cambridge.


AI robot finds ingredient in toothpaste may help fight malaria

#artificialintelligence

A laboratory robot powered by artificial intelligence (AI) has discovered that a compound commonly found in toothpaste could be used to combat drug-resistant malaria parasites. Triclosan could be deployed against strains of plasmodium malaria parasites that have evolved resistance to the widely used drug pyrimethamine, according to the University of Cambridge. Pyrimethamine works by inhibiting a particular enzyme called DHFR and scientists have known for some time that triclosan can be employed to target another enzyme, ENR. The fast-moving AI routines of the robot "Eve", however, which formulate, test and re-evaluate hypotheses in quick succession, discovered that the common toothpaste chemical also attacks DHFR – even in parasites resistant to pyrimethamine. It has led researchers to hope that triclosan could be developed for use in a two-pronged attack on plasmodium in the liver and in the blood.


British AI robot finds malaria killer in common toothpaste ingredient - Xinhua

#artificialintelligence

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 18 (Xinhua) -- An artificial intelligence (AI) robot made by a British university has become a big hero after it helped scientists find a malaria killer in a common toothpaste ingredient, a new study revealed Thursday. Scientists at the university of Cambridge in Britain used the "Robot Scientist," Eve, in a high-throughput screen and discovered that triclosan, an ingredient found in many toothpastes, may help fight against strains of a malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently-used drugs to treat the disease. The findings of the study by the Cambridge researchers were published in the journal Scientific Reports on Thursday. With the help of the AI-powered Eve, the researchers discovered that triclosan inhibits the spread of a kind of enzyme of the malaria parasite, called DHFR, thus stopping the growth of the parasite in the blood. The discovery challenged a previous assumption that triclosan inhibits the growth in culture of the malaria parasite Plasmodium during the blood-stage, because it is targeting an enzyme known as enoyl reductase (ENR) found in the liver.


AI 'scientist' bolsters fight against drug-resistant malaria

#artificialintelligence

London, Jan 18 (PTI) An artificially-intelligent'robot scientist' has helped identify a common toothpaste ingredient that can fight strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant currently-used drugs. Malaria kills over half a million people each year, predominantly in Africa and south-east Asia. While a number of medicines are used to treat the disease, malaria parasites are growing increasingly resistant to these drugs, raising the spectre of untreatable malaria in the future. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, employed the robot scientist'Eve' in a high-throughput screen and discovered that triclosan, an ingredient found in many toothpastes, may help the fight against drug-resistance. When used in toothpaste, triclosan prevents the build-up of plaque bacteria by inhibiting the action of an enzyme known as enoyl reductase (ENR), which is involved in the production of fatty acids.


How AI is changing the future of healthcare GovInsider

#artificialintelligence

In 1942, Isaac Asimov attempted to lay out a moral framework for how robots can serve humans. The science fiction writer came up with "three laws of robotics", meant to prevent machines from harming their human creators. This is a concept Eric Horvitz, technical fellow, Artificial Intelligence and Research and head of Microsoft Research's Global Labs, has been studying for decades. In 2014, he set up the'One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence', which will study the future of AI every five years for a century. The project's first report last year said that "AI-based applications could improve health outcomes and the quality of life for millions of people in the coming years".


Drones and smartphones help fight malaria in Tanzania

Engadget

The fight against malaria has been improving, but there's still lots more work to do. For one thing, anti-larval sprays are both expensive and time-consuming -- you can't always afford to spray an entire area. Thankfully, a mix of technology is making that mosquito battle more practical. Wales' Aberystwyth University and Tanzania's Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme have partnered on an initiative that uses drones to survey malaria hot zones and identify the water-laden areas where malaria-carrying mosquitoes are likely to breed. An off-the-shelf drone (in this case, DJI's Phantom 3) can cover a large rice paddy in 20 minutes, and the data can be processed in the space of an afternoon.


War in Yemen: In a Devastated Country, One City Is Thriving

Der Spiegel International

No, cholera isn't the worst problem here," says the hospital director. The fatal epidemic spreading across Yemen in the last eight months, which has infected around 800,000 people and claimed over 2,000 lives, "is only the third or fourth most common cause of death here in Marib," says Dr. Mohammed al-Qubati. "Most deaths are caused by landmines." Marib's desert valley, located 172 kilometers (107 miles) east of the capital Sanaa, served for months as the frontline of some of the civil war's fiercest fighting. Starting in 2015, the attacking Houthi militants began laying tens of thousands of land mines on roads, in fields and in gardens.