Robots


RoboCup-2000: The Fourth Robotic Soccer World Championships

AI Magazine

The Fourth Robotic Soccer World Championships (RoboCup-2000) was held from 27 August to 3 September 2000 at the Melbourne Exhibition Center in Melbourne, Australia. RoboCup-2000 showed dramatic improvement over past years in each of the existing robotic soccer leagues (legged, small size, mid size, and simulation) and introduced RoboCup Jr. competitions and RoboCup Rescue and Humanoid demonstration events. The RoboCup Workshop, held in conjunction with the championships, provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences among the different leagues. This article summarizes the advances seen at RoboCup-2000, including reports from the championship teams and overviews of all the RoboCup events.


RoboCup-2000: The Fourth Robotic Soccer World Championships

AI Magazine

The Fourth Robotic Soccer World Championships (RoboCup-2000) was held from 27 August to 3 September 2000 at the Melbourne Exhibition Center in Melbourne, Australia. In total, 83 teams, consisting of about 500 people, participated in RoboCup-2000, and about 5000 spectators watched the events. RoboCup-2000 showed dramatic improvement over past years in each of the existing robotic soccer leagues (legged, small size, mid size, and simulation) and introduced RoboCup Jr. competitions and RoboCup Rescue and Humanoid demonstration events. The RoboCup Workshop, held in conjunction with the championships, provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences among the different leagues. This article summarizes the advances seen at RoboCup-2000, including reports from the championship teams and overviews of all the RoboCup events.


The CS Freiburg Team: Playing Robotic Soccer Based on an Explicit World Model

AI Magazine

Robotic soccer is an ideal task to demonstrate new techniques and explore new problems. Our intention in building a robotic soccer team and participating in RoboCup-98 was, first, to demonstrate the usefulness of the self-localization methods we have developed. Second, we wanted to show that playing soccer based on an explicit world model is much more effective than other methods. Third, we intended to explore the problem of building and maintaining a global team world model.


The CS Freiburg Team: Playing Robotic Soccer Based on an Explicit World Model

AI Magazine

Robotic soccer is an ideal task to demonstrate new techniques and explore new problems. Moreover, problems and solutions can easily be communicated because soccer is a well-known game. Our intention in building a robotic soccer team and participating in RoboCup-98 was, first, to demonstrate the usefulness of the self-localization methods we have developed. Second, we wanted to show that playing soccer based on an explicit world model is much more effective than other methods. Third, we intended to explore the problem of building and maintaining a global team world model. As has been demonstrated by the performance of our team, we were successful with the first two points. Moreover, robotic soccer gave us the opportunity to study problems in distributed, cooperative sensing.