Robots


DTMF Audio Communication for NAO Robots

AAAI Conferences

We propose an alternative to Wi-Fi for robotic communication, as its increased use in a competition environment has lead to highly overlapping and interfering networks. This interference often causes unreliable transmission of data, which affects teams' ability to coordinate complex behaviors. Our method uses fixed length Dual Tone Multi Frequency (DTMF) messages and uses a basic packet structure designed to reduce data corruption as a result of noise. We conducted twelve different experiments varying the distance between robots and message format, as well as whether the robots are walking or sitting silently. The results show that while this method appears to be sensitive to room reverberation and multipath effects, it has very low data corruption rates, which makes it suitable for use in some applications.


Humanoid Robots and Spoken Dialog Systems for Brief Health Interventions

AAAI Conferences

We combined a spoken dialog system that we developed to deliver brief health interventions with the fully autonomous humanoid robot (NAO). The dialog system is based on a framework facilitating Markov decision processes (MDP). It is optimized using reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms with data we collected from real user interactions. The system begins to learn optimal dialog strategies for initiative selection and for the type of confirmations that it uses during theinteraction. The health intervention, delivered by a 3D character instead of the NAO, has already been evaluated, with positive results in terms of task completion, ease of use, and future intention to use the system.  The current spoken dialog system for the humanoid robot is a novelty and exists so far as a proof ofconcept.


RoboCup: 10 Years of Achievements and Future Challenges

AI Magazine

Will we see autonomous humanoid robots that play (and win) soccer against the human soccer world champion in the year 2050? There are serious research questions that have to be tackled behind the scenes of a soccer game: perception, decision making, action selection, hardware design, materials, energy, and more. RoboCup is also about the nature of intelligence, and playing soccer acts as a performance measure of systems that contain artificial intelligence -- in much the same way chess has been used over the last century. This article outlines the current situation following 10 years of research with reference to the results of the 2006 World Championship in Bremen, Germany, and discusses future challenges.


RoboCup: 10 Years of Achievements and Future Challenges

AI Magazine

Will we see autonomous humanoid robots that play (and win) soccer against the human soccer world champion in the year 2050? This question is not easy to answer, and the idea is quite visionary. However, this is the goal of the RoboCup Federation. There are serious research questions that have to be tackled behind the scenes of a soccer game: perception, decision making, action selection, hardware design, materials, energy, and more. RoboCup is also about the nature of intelligence, and playing soccer acts as a performance measure of systems that contain artificial intelligence -- in much the same way chess has been used over the last century. This article outlines the current situation following 10 years of research with reference to the results of the 2006 World Championship in Bremen, Germany, and discusses future challenges.