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Personal Assistant Systems: Overviews


AI in the Canadian Financial Services Industry

#artificialintelligence

In recent years, players within Canada's financial services industry, from banks to Fintech startups, have shown early and innovative adoption of artificial intelligence ("AI") and machine learning ("ML") within their organizations and services. With the ability to review and analyze vast amounts of data, AI algorithms and ML help financial services organizations improve operations, safeguard against financial crime, sharpen their competitive edge and better personalize their services. As the industry continues to implement more AI and build upon its existing applications, it should ensure that such systems are used responsibly and designed to account for any unintended consequences. Below we provide a brief overview of current considerations, as well as anticipated future shifts, in respect of the use of AI in Canada's financial services industry. At a high level, Canadian banks and many bank-specific activities are matters of federal jurisdiction.


Conversational Agents: Theory and Applications

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this chapter, we provide a review of conversational agents (CAs), discussing chatbots, intended for casual conversation with a user, as well as task-oriented agents that generally engage in discussions intended to reach one or several specific goals, often (but not always) within a specific domain. We also consider the concept of embodied conversational agents, briefly reviewing aspects such as character animation and speech processing. The many different approaches for representing dialogue in CAs are discussed in some detail, along with methods for evaluating such agents, emphasizing the important topics of accountability and interpretability. A brief historical overview is given, followed by an extensive overview of various applications, especially in the fields of health and education. We end the chapter by discussing benefits and potential risks regarding the societal impact of current and future CA technology.


Fair ranking: a critical review, challenges, and future directions

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Ranking, recommendation, and retrieval systems are widely used in online platforms and other societal systems, including e-commerce, media-streaming, admissions, gig platforms, and hiring. In the recent past, a large "fair ranking" research literature has been developed around making these systems fair to the individuals, providers, or content that are being ranked. Most of this literature defines fairness for a single instance of retrieval, or as a simple additive notion for multiple instances of retrievals over time. This work provides a critical overview of this literature, detailing the often context-specific concerns that such an approach misses: the gap between high ranking placements and true provider utility, spillovers and compounding effects over time, induced strategic incentives, and the effect of statistical uncertainty. We then provide a path forward for a more holistic and impact-oriented fair ranking research agenda, including methodological lessons from other fields and the role of the broader stakeholder community in overcoming data bottlenecks and designing effective regulatory environments.


A Systematic Analysis on the Impact of Contextual Information on Point-of-Interest Recommendation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

As the popularity of Location-based Social Networks (LBSNs) increases, designing accurate models for Point-of-Interest (POI) recommendation receives more attention. POI recommendation is often performed by incorporating contextual information into previously designed recommendation algorithms. Some of the major contextual information that has been considered in POI recommendation are the location attributes (i.e., exact coordinates of a location, category, and check-in time), the user attributes (i.e., comments, reviews, tips, and check-in made to the locations), and other information, such as the distance of the POI from user's main activity location, and the social tie between users. The right selection of such factors can significantly impact the performance of the POI recommendation. However, previous research does not consider the impact of the combination of these different factors. In this paper, we propose different contextual models and analyze the fusion of different major contextual information in POI recommendation. The major contributions of this paper are: (i) providing an extensive survey of context-aware location recommendation (ii) quantifying and analyzing the impact of different contextual information (e.g., social, temporal, spatial, and categorical) in the POI recommendation on available baselines and two new linear and non-linear models, that can incorporate all the major contextual information into a single recommendation model, and (iii) evaluating the considered models using two well-known real-world datasets. Our results indicate that while modeling geographical and temporal influences can improve recommendation quality, fusing all other contextual information into a recommendation model is not always the best strategy.


From Psychological Curiosity to Artificial Curiosity: Curiosity-Driven Learning in Artificial Intelligence Tasks

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Psychological curiosity plays a significant role in human intelligence to enhance learning through exploration and information acquisition. In the Artificial Intelligence (AI) community, artificial curiosity provides a natural intrinsic motivation for efficient learning as inspired by human cognitive development; meanwhile, it can bridge the existing gap between AI research and practical application scenarios, such as overfitting, poor generalization, limited training samples, high computational cost, etc. As a result, curiosity-driven learning (CDL) has become increasingly popular, where agents are self-motivated to learn novel knowledge. In this paper, we first present a comprehensive review on the psychological study of curiosity and summarize a unified framework for quantifying curiosity as well as its arousal mechanism. Based on the psychological principle, we further survey the literature of existing CDL methods in the fields of Reinforcement Learning, Recommendation, and Classification, where both advantages and disadvantages as well as future work are discussed. As a result, this work provides fruitful insights for future CDL research and yield possible directions for further improvement.


Resource recommender system performance improvement by exploring similar tags and detecting tags communities

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Many researchers have used tag information to improve the performance of recommendation techniques in recommender systems. Examining the tags of users will help to get their interests and leads to more accuracy in the recommendations. Since user-defined tags are chosen freely and without any restrictions, problems arise in determining their exact meaning and the similarity of tags. On the other hand, using thesauruses and ontologies to find the meaning of tags is not very efficient due to their free definition by users and the use of different languages in many data sets. Therefore, this article uses the mathematical and statistical methods to determine lexical similarity and co-occurrence tags solution to assign semantic similarity. On the other hand, due to the change of users' interests over time this article have considered the time of tag assignments in co-occurrence tags for determined similarity of tags. Then the graph is created based on these similarities. For modeling the interests of the users, the communities of tags are determined by using community detection methods. So recommendations based on the communities of tags and similarity between resources are done. The performance of the proposed method has been done using two criteria of precision and recall based on evaluations with "Delicious" dataset. The evaluation results show that, the precision and recall of the proposed method have significantly improved, compared to the other methods.


Challenges of Artificial Intelligence -- From Machine Learning and Computer Vision to Emotional Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a part of everyday conversation and our lives. It is considered as the new electricity that is revolutionizing the world. AI is heavily invested in both industry and academy. However, there is also a lot of hype in the current AI debate. AI based on so-called deep learning has achieved impressive results in many problems, but its limits are already visible. AI has been under research since the 1940s, and the industry has seen many ups and downs due to over-expectations and related disappointments that have followed. The purpose of this book is to give a realistic picture of AI, its history, its potential and limitations. We believe that AI is a helper, not a ruler of humans. We begin by describing what AI is and how it has evolved over the decades. After fundamentals, we explain the importance of massive data for the current mainstream of artificial intelligence. The most common representations for AI, methods, and machine learning are covered. In addition, the main application areas are introduced. Computer vision has been central to the development of AI. The book provides a general introduction to computer vision, and includes an exposure to the results and applications of our own research. Emotions are central to human intelligence, but little use has been made in AI. We present the basics of emotional intelligence and our own research on the topic. We discuss super-intelligence that transcends human understanding, explaining why such achievement seems impossible on the basis of present knowledge,and how AI could be improved. Finally, a summary is made of the current state of AI and what to do in the future. In the appendix, we look at the development of AI education, especially from the perspective of contents at our own university.


Multi Document Reading Comprehension

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Reading Comprehension (RC) is a task of answering a question from a given passage or a set of passages. In the case of multiple passages, the task is to find the best possible answer to the question. Recent trials and experiments in the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP) have proved that machines can be provided with the ability to not only process the text in the passage and understand its meaning to answer the question from the passage, but also can surpass the Human Performance on many datasets such as Standford's Question Answering Dataset (SQuAD). This paper presents a study on Reading Comprehension and its evolution in Natural Language Processing over the past few decades. We shall also study how the task of Single Document Reading Comprehension acts as a building block for our Multi-Document Reading Comprehension System. In the latter half of the paper, we'll be studying about a recently proposed model for Multi-Document Reading Comprehension - RE3QA that is comprised of a Reader, Retriever, and a Re-ranker based network to fetch the best possible answer from a given set of passages.


Robust Natural Language Processing: Recent Advances, Challenges, and Future Directions

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Recent natural language processing (NLP) techniques have accomplished high performance on benchmark datasets, primarily due to the significant improvement in the performance of deep learning. The advances in the research community have led to great enhancements in state-of-the-art production systems for NLP tasks, such as virtual assistants, speech recognition, and sentiment analysis. However, such NLP systems still often fail when tested with adversarial attacks. The initial lack of robustness exposed troubling gaps in current models' language understanding capabilities, creating problems when NLP systems are deployed in real life. In this paper, we present a structured overview of NLP robustness research by summarizing the literature in a systemic way across various dimensions. We then take a deep-dive into the various dimensions of robustness, across techniques, metrics, embeddings, and benchmarks. Finally, we argue that robustness should be multi-dimensional, provide insights into current research, identify gaps in the literature to suggest directions worth pursuing to address these gaps.


Towards a Science of Human-AI Decision Making: A Survey of Empirical Studies

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

As AI systems demonstrate increasingly strong predictive performance, their adoption has grown in numerous domains. However, in high-stakes domains such as criminal justice and healthcare, full automation is often not desirable due to safety, ethical, and legal concerns, yet fully manual approaches can be inaccurate and time consuming. As a result, there is growing interest in the research community to augment human decision making with AI assistance. Besides developing AI technologies for this purpose, the emerging field of human-AI decision making must embrace empirical approaches to form a foundational understanding of how humans interact and work with AI to make decisions. To invite and help structure research efforts towards a science of understanding and improving human-AI decision making, we survey recent literature of empirical human-subject studies on this topic. We summarize the study design choices made in over 100 papers in three important aspects: (1) decision tasks, (2) AI models and AI assistance elements, and (3) evaluation metrics. For each aspect, we summarize current trends, discuss gaps in current practices of the field, and make a list of recommendations for future research. Our survey highlights the need to develop common frameworks to account for the design and research spaces of human-AI decision making, so that researchers can make rigorous choices in study design, and the research community can build on each other's work and produce generalizable scientific knowledge. We also hope this survey will serve as a bridge for HCI and AI communities to work together to mutually shape the empirical science and computational technologies for human-AI decision making.