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Neural Natural Language Generation: A Survey on Multilinguality, Multimodality, Controllability and Learning

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Developing artificial learning systems that can understand and generate natural language has been one of the long-standing goals of artificial intelligence. Recent decades have witnessed an impressive progress on both of these problems, giving rise to a new family of approaches. Especially, the advances in deep learning over the past couple of years have led to neural approaches to natural language generation (NLG). These methods combine generative language learning techniques with neural-networks based frameworks. With a wide range of applications in natural language processing, neural NLG (NNLG) is a new and fast growing field of research. In this state-of-the-art report, we investigate the recent developments and applications of NNLG in its full extent from a multidimensional view, covering critical perspectives such as multimodality, multilinguality, controllability and learning strategies. We summarize the fundamental building blocks of NNLG approaches from these aspects and provide detailed reviews of commonly used preprocessing steps and basic neural architectures. This report also focuses on the seminal applications of these NNLG models such as machine translation, description generation, automatic speech recognition, abstractive summarization, text simplification, question answering and generation, and dialogue generation. Finally, we conclude with a thorough discussion of the described frameworks by pointing out some open research directions.


TaxoEnrich: Self-Supervised Taxonomy Completion via Structure-Semantic Representations

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Taxonomies are fundamental to many real-world applications in various domains, serving as structural representations of knowledge. To deal with the increasing volume of new concepts needed to be organized as taxonomies, researchers turn to automatically completion of an existing taxonomy with new concepts. In this paper, we propose TaxoEnrich, a new taxonomy completion framework, which effectively leverages both semantic features and structural information in the existing taxonomy and offers a better representation of candidate position to boost the performance of taxonomy completion. Specifically, TaxoEnrich consists of four components: (1) taxonomy-contextualized embedding which incorporates both semantic meanings of concept and taxonomic relations based on powerful pretrained language models; (2) a taxonomy-aware sequential encoder which learns candidate position representations by encoding the structural information of taxonomy; (3) a query-aware sibling encoder which adaptively aggregates candidate siblings to augment candidate position representations based on their importance to the query-position matching; (4) a query-position matching model which extends existing work with our new candidate position representations. Extensive experiments on four large real-world datasets from different domains show that \TaxoEnrich achieves the best performance among all evaluation metrics and outperforms previous state-of-the-art methods by a large margin.


Powering Semantic Similarity Search in Computer Vision with State of the Art Embeddings

#artificialintelligence

A whopping 90% of data created since the dawn of human civilization was produced in the past two years! The rate of data creation continues to increase with the proliferation of digital technologies such as social media and the internet of things (IoT) together with ever-faster wireless communication technologies such as 5G. However, most new data created is "Unstructured," such as text, images, audio, and video [Source]. Unstructured data gets its name because it does not have an inherent structure, unlike a table of rows and columns. Instead, unstructured data contains information in one of several possible formats. For example, e-commerce images, customer reviews, social media posts, surveillance videos, speech commands, etc., are rich sources of information that do not follow the traditional tabular data format. Recent advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) technologies have created a way to extract useful information from unstructured data sources in a scalable way by the use of "embeddings."


A Survey on Visual Transfer Learning using Knowledge Graphs

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Recent approaches of computer vision utilize deep learning methods as they perform quite well if training and testing domains follow the same underlying data distribution. However, it has been shown that minor variations in the images that occur when using these methods in the real world can lead to unpredictable errors. Transfer learning is the area of machine learning that tries to prevent these errors. Especially, approaches that augment image data using auxiliary knowledge encoded in language embeddings or knowledge graphs (KGs) have achieved promising results in recent years. This survey focuses on visual transfer learning approaches using KGs. KGs can represent auxiliary knowledge either in an underlying graph-structured schema or in a vector-based knowledge graph embedding. Intending to enable the reader to solve visual transfer learning problems with the help of specific KG-DL configurations we start with a description of relevant modeling structures of a KG of various expressions, such as directed labeled graphs, hypergraphs, and hyper-relational graphs. We explain the notion of feature extractor, while specifically referring to visual and semantic features. We provide a broad overview of knowledge graph embedding methods and describe several joint training objectives suitable to combine them with high dimensional visual embeddings. The main section introduces four different categories on how a KG can be combined with a DL pipeline: 1) Knowledge Graph as a Reviewer; 2) Knowledge Graph as a Trainee; 3) Knowledge Graph as a Trainer; and 4) Knowledge Graph as a Peer. To help researchers find evaluation benchmarks, we provide an overview of generic KGs and a set of image processing datasets and benchmarks including various types of auxiliary knowledge. Last, we summarize related surveys and give an outlook about challenges and open issues for future research.


Low-resource Learning with Knowledge Graphs: A Comprehensive Survey

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Machine learning methods especially deep neural networks have achieved great success but many of them often rely on a number of labeled samples for training. In real-world applications, we often need to address sample shortage due to e.g., dynamic contexts with emerging prediction targets and costly sample annotation. Therefore, low-resource learning, which aims to learn robust prediction models with no enough resources (especially training samples), is now being widely investigated. Among all the low-resource learning studies, many prefer to utilize some auxiliary information in the form of Knowledge Graph (KG), which is becoming more and more popular for knowledge representation, to reduce the reliance on labeled samples. In this survey, we very comprehensively reviewed over $90$ papers about KG-aware research for two major low-resource learning settings -- zero-shot learning (ZSL) where new classes for prediction have never appeared in training, and few-shot learning (FSL) where new classes for prediction have only a small number of labeled samples that are available. We first introduced the KGs used in ZSL and FSL studies as well as the existing and potential KG construction solutions, and then systematically categorized and summarized KG-aware ZSL and FSL methods, dividing them into different paradigms such as the mapping-based, the data augmentation, the propagation-based and the optimization-based. We next presented different applications, including not only KG augmented tasks in Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing (e.g., image classification, text classification and knowledge extraction), but also tasks for KG curation (e.g., inductive KG completion), and some typical evaluation resources for each task. We eventually discussed some challenges and future directions on aspects such as new learning and reasoning paradigms, and the construction of high quality KGs.


Predicting Document Coverage for Relation Extraction

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper presents a new task of predicting the coverage of a text document for relation extraction (RE): does the document contain many relational tuples for a given entity? Coverage predictions are useful in selecting the best documents for knowledge base construction with large input corpora. To study this problem, we present a dataset of 31,366 diverse documents for 520 entities. We analyze the correlation of document coverage with features like length, entity mention frequency, Alexa rank, language complexity and information retrieval scores. Each of these features has only moderate predictive power. We employ methods combining features with statistical models like TF-IDF and language models like BERT. The model combining features and BERT, HERB, achieves an F1 score of up to 46%. We demonstrate the utility of coverage predictions on two use cases: KB construction and claim refutation.


Top 30 Machine Learning Projects Ideas for Beginners in 2021

#artificialintelligence

"What projects can I do with machine learning?" We often get asked this question a lot from beginners getting started with machine learning. ProjectPro industry experts recommend that you explore some exciting, cool, fun, and easy machine learning project ideas across diverse business domains to get hands-on experience on the machine learning skills you've learned.


CLLD: Contrastive Learning with Label Distance for Text Classificatioin

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Existed pre-trained models have achieved state-of-the-art performance on various text classification tasks. These models have proven to be useful in learning universal language representations. However, the semantic discrepancy between similar texts cannot be effectively distinguished by advanced pre-trained models, which have a great influence on the performance of hard-to-distinguish classes. To address this problem, we propose a novel Contrastive Learning with Label Distance (CLLD) in this work. Inspired by recent advances in contrastive learning, we specifically design a classification method with label distance for learning contrastive classes. CLLD ensures the flexibility within the subtle differences that lead to different label assignments, and generates the distinct representations for each class having similarity simultaneously. Extensive experiments on public benchmarks and internal datasets demonstrate that our method improves the performance of pre-trained models on classification tasks. Importantly, our experiments suggest that the learned label distance relieve the adversarial nature of interclasses.


TAG: Toward Accurate Social Media Content Tagging with a Concept Graph

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Although conceptualization has been widely studied in semantics and knowledge representation, it is still challenging to find the most accurate concept phrases to characterize the main idea of a text snippet on the fast-growing social media. This is partly attributed to the fact that most knowledge bases contain general terms of the world, such as trees and cars, which do not have the defining power or are not interesting enough to social media app users. Another reason is that the intricacy of natural language allows the use of tense, negation and grammar to change the logic or emphasis of language, thus conveying completely different meanings. In this paper, we present TAG, a high-quality concept matching dataset consisting of 10,000 labeled pairs of fine-grained concepts and web-styled natural language sentences, mined from the open-domain social media. The concepts we consider represent the trending interests of online users. Associated with TAG is a concept graph of these fine-grained concepts and entities to provide the structural context information. We evaluate a wide range of popular neural text matching models as well as pre-trained language models on TAG, and point out their insufficiency to tag social media content with the most appropriate concept. We further propose a novel graph-graph matching method that demonstrates superior abstraction and generalization performance by better utilizing both the structural context in the concept graph and logic interactions between semantic units in the sentence via syntactic dependency parsing. We open-source both the TAG dataset and the proposed methods to facilitate further research.


CoVA: Context-aware Visual Attention for Webpage Information Extraction

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Webpage information extraction (WIE) is an important step to create knowledge bases. For this, classical WIE methods leverage the Document Object Model (DOM) tree of a website. However, use of the DOM tree poses significant challenges as context and appearance are encoded in an abstract manner. To address this challenge we propose to reformulate WIE as a context-aware Webpage Object Detection task. Specifically, we develop a Context-aware Visual Attention-based (CoVA) detection pipeline which combines appearance features with syntactical structure from the DOM tree. To study the approach we collect a new large-scale dataset of e-commerce websites for which we manually annotate every web element with four labels: product price, product title, product image and background. On this dataset we show that the proposed CoVA approach is a new challenging baseline which improves upon prior state-of-the-art methods.