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Machine Translation: Overviews


Neural Natural Language Generation: A Survey on Multilinguality, Multimodality, Controllability and Learning

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Developing artificial learning systems that can understand and generate natural language has been one of the long-standing goals of artificial intelligence. Recent decades have witnessed an impressive progress on both of these problems, giving rise to a new family of approaches. Especially, the advances in deep learning over the past couple of years have led to neural approaches to natural language generation (NLG). These methods combine generative language learning techniques with neural-networks based frameworks. With a wide range of applications in natural language processing, neural NLG (NNLG) is a new and fast growing field of research. In this state-of-the-art report, we investigate the recent developments and applications of NNLG in its full extent from a multidimensional view, covering critical perspectives such as multimodality, multilinguality, controllability and learning strategies. We summarize the fundamental building blocks of NNLG approaches from these aspects and provide detailed reviews of commonly used preprocessing steps and basic neural architectures. This report also focuses on the seminal applications of these NNLG models such as machine translation, description generation, automatic speech recognition, abstractive summarization, text simplification, question answering and generation, and dialogue generation. Finally, we conclude with a thorough discussion of the described frameworks by pointing out some open research directions.


LaMDA: Language Models for Dialog Applications

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We present LaMDA: Language Models for Dialog Applications. LaMDA is a family of Transformer-based neural language models specialized for dialog, which have up to 137B parameters and are pre-trained on 1.56T words of public dialog data and web text. While model scaling alone can improve quality, it shows less improvements on safety and factual grounding. We demonstrate that fine-tuning with annotated data and enabling the model to consult external knowledge sources can lead to significant improvements towards the two key challenges of safety and factual grounding. The first challenge, safety, involves ensuring that the model's responses are consistent with a set of human values, such as preventing harmful suggestions and unfair bias. We quantify safety using a metric based on an illustrative set of human values, and we find that filtering candidate responses using a LaMDA classifier fine-tuned with a small amount of crowdworker-annotated data offers a promising approach to improving model safety. The second challenge, factual grounding, involves enabling the model to consult external knowledge sources, such as an information retrieval system, a language translator, and a calculator. We quantify factuality using a groundedness metric, and we find that our approach enables the model to generate responses grounded in known sources, rather than responses that merely sound plausible. Finally, we explore the use of LaMDA in the domains of education and content recommendations, and analyze their helpfulness and role consistency.


Conversational Agents: Theory and Applications

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this chapter, we provide a review of conversational agents (CAs), discussing chatbots, intended for casual conversation with a user, as well as task-oriented agents that generally engage in discussions intended to reach one or several specific goals, often (but not always) within a specific domain. We also consider the concept of embodied conversational agents, briefly reviewing aspects such as character animation and speech processing. The many different approaches for representing dialogue in CAs are discussed in some detail, along with methods for evaluating such agents, emphasizing the important topics of accountability and interpretability. A brief historical overview is given, followed by an extensive overview of various applications, especially in the fields of health and education. We end the chapter by discussing benefits and potential risks regarding the societal impact of current and future CA technology.


Diagnosing AI Explanation Methods with Folk Concepts of Behavior

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

When explaining AI behavior to humans, how is the communicated information being comprehended by the human explainee, and does it match what the explanation attempted to communicate? When can we say that an explanation is explaining something? We aim to provide an answer by leveraging theory of mind literature about the folk concepts that humans use to understand behavior. We establish a framework of social attribution by the human explainee, which describes the function of explanations: the concrete information that humans comprehend from them. Specifically, effective explanations should be coherent (communicate information which generalizes to other contrast cases), complete (communicating an explicit contrast case, objective causes, and subjective causes), and interactive (surfacing and resolving contradictions to the generalization property through iterations). We demonstrate that many XAI mechanisms can be mapped to folk concepts of behavior. This allows us to uncover their modes of failure that prevent current methods from explaining effectively, and what is necessary to enable coherent explanations.


Analyzing Scientific Publications using Domain-Specific Word Embedding and Topic Modelling

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The scientific world is changing at a rapid pace, with new technology being developed and new trends being set at an increasing frequency. This paper presents a framework for conducting scientific analyses of academic publications, which is crucial to monitor research trends and identify potential innovations. This framework adopts and combines various techniques of Natural Language Processing, such as word embedding and topic modelling. Word embedding is used to capture semantic meanings of domain-specific words. We propose two novel scientific publication embedding, i.e., PUB-G and PUB-W, which are capable of learning semantic meanings of general as well as domain-specific words in various research fields. Thereafter, topic modelling is used to identify clusters of research topics within these larger research fields. We curated a publication dataset consisting of two conferences and two journals from 1995 to 2020 from two research domains. Experimental results show that our PUB-G and PUB-W embeddings are superior in comparison to other baseline embeddings by a margin of ~0.18-1.03 based on topic coherence.


Learning Non-Monotonic Automatic Post-Editing of Translations from Human Orderings

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Recent research in neural machine translation has explored flexible generation orders, as an alternative to left-to-right generation. However, training non-monotonic models brings a new complication: how to search for a good ordering when there is a combinatorial explosion of orderings arriving at the same final result? Also, how do these automatic orderings compare with the actual behaviour of human translators? Current models rely on manually built biases or are left to explore all possibilities on their own. In this paper, we analyze the orderings produced by human post-editors and use them to train an automatic post-editing system. We compare the resulting system with those trained with left-to-right and random post-editing orderings. We observe that humans tend to follow a nearly left-to-right order, but with interesting deviations, such as preferring to start by correcting punctuation or verbs.


A survey on multi-objective hyperparameter optimization algorithms for Machine Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Hyperparameter optimization (HPO) is a necessary step to ensure the best possible performance of Machine Learning (ML) algorithms. Several methods have been developed to perform HPO; most of these are focused on optimizing one performance measure (usually an error-based measure), and the literature on such single-objective HPO problems is vast. Recently, though, algorithms have appeared which focus on optimizing multiple conflicting objectives simultaneously. This article presents a systematic survey of the literature published between 2014 and 2020 on multi-objective HPO algorithms, distinguishing between metaheuristic-based algorithms, metamodel-based algorithms, and approaches using a mixture of both. We also discuss the quality metrics used to compare multi-objective HPO procedures and present future research directions.


NL-Augmenter: A Framework for Task-Sensitive Natural Language Augmentation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Data augmentation is an important component in the robustness evaluation of models in natural language processing (NLP) and in enhancing the diversity of the data they are trained on. In this paper, we present NL-Augmenter, a new participatory Python-based natural language augmentation framework which supports the creation of both transformations (modifications to the data) and filters (data splits according to specific features). We describe the framework and an initial set of 117 transformations and 23 filters for a variety of natural language tasks. We demonstrate the efficacy of NL-Augmenter by using several of its transformations to analyze the robustness of popular natural language models. The infrastructure, datacards and robustness analysis results are available publicly on the NL-Augmenter repository (\url{https://github.com/GEM-benchmark/NL-Augmenter}).


AI and the Everything in the Whole Wide World Benchmark

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

There is a tendency across different subfields in AI to valorize a small collection of influential benchmarks. These benchmarks operate as stand-ins for a range of anointed common problems that are frequently framed as foundational milestones on the path towards flexible and generalizable AI systems. State-of-the-art performance on these benchmarks is widely understood as indicative of progress towards these long-term goals. In this position paper, we explore the limits of such benchmarks in order to reveal the construct validity issues in their framing as the functionally "general" broad measures of progress they are set up to be.


BEAMetrics: A Benchmark for Language Generation Evaluation Evaluation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Natural language processing (NLP) systems are increasingly trained to generate open-ended text rather than classifying between responses. This makes research on evaluation metrics for generated language -- functions that score system output given the context and/or human reference responses -- of critical importance. However, different metrics have different strengths and biases, and reflect human intuitions better on some tasks than others. There is currently no simple, unified way to compare, analyse or evaluate metrics across a representative set of tasks. Here, we describe the Benchmark to Evaluate Automatic Metrics (BEAMetrics), a resource to make research into new metrics itself easier to evaluate. BEAMetrics users can quickly compare existing and new metrics with human judgements across a diverse set of tasks, quality dimensions (fluency vs. coherence vs. informativeness etc), and languages. As generation experts might predict, BEAMetrics reveals stark task-dependent differences between existing metrics, and consistently poor performance on tasks with complex answer spaces or high reliance on general knowledge. While this analysis highlights a critical issue facing current research practice, BEAMetrics also contribute to its resolution by facilitating research into better metrics -- particularly those that can account for the complex interaction between context and general knowledge inherent to many modern NLP applications. BEAMetrics is available under the MIT License: https://github.com/ThomasScialom/BEAMetrics