Reinforcement Learning


Understanding Agent Environment in AI - KDnuggets

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Before starting the article, it is important to understand what an agent in AI is. The agent is basically an entity that helps the AI, machine learning, or deep reinforcement learning to make a decision or trigger the AI to make a decision. In terms of software, it is defined as the entity which can take decisions and can make different decisions on the basis of changes in the environment, or after getting input from the external environment. In simpler words, the quick agent perceives external change and acts against it the better the results obtained from the model. Hence the role of the agent is always very important in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning.



30+ New Machine Learning Projects for Beginners With Source Code

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This projects contains demo video, steps and source codes / tutorial for easiness or reference purpose. This curated list is suitable for beginners and intermediate ML Practitioners. Step 4. Find area using FindContours Firstly, the algorithm have to find where the grids are! Once grids are extracted, for each grid you've to: Cyril Diagne (the creator of this project) has used BASNet for salient object detection and background removal. The accuracy and range of this model are stunning and there are many nice use cases so I packaged it as a micro-service / docker image: Basnet.


Emergent bartering behaviour in multi-agent reinforcement learning

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Advances in artificial intelligence often stem from the development of new environments that abstract real-world situations into a form where research can be done conveniently. This paper contributes such an environment based on ideas inspired by elementary Microeconomics. Agents learn to produce resources in a spatially complex world, trade them with one another, and consume those that they prefer. We show that the emergent production, consumption, and pricing behaviours respond to environmental conditions in the directions predicted by supply and demand shifts in Microeconomics. We also demonstrate settings where the agents' emergent prices for goods vary over space, reflecting the local abundance of goods.


Advanced Reinforcement Learning: policy gradient methods

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Sample efficiency for policy gradient methods is pretty poor. We throw out each batch of data immediately after just one gradient step. This is the most complete Reinforcement Learning course series on Udemy. In it, you will learn to implement some of the most powerful Deep Reinforcement Learning algorithms in Python using PyTorch and PyTorch lightning. You will implement from scratch adaptive algorithms that solve control tasks based on experience.


An experimental design perspective on model-based reinforcement learning

AIHub

We evaluate BARL on the TQRL setting in 5 environments which span a variety of reward function types, dimensionalities, and amounts of required data. In this evaluation, we estimate the minimum amount of data an algorithm needs to learn a controller. The evaluation environments include the standard underactuated pendulum swing-up task, a cartpole swing-up task, the standard 2-DOF reacher task, a navigation problem where the agent must find a path across pools of lava, and a simulated nuclear fusion control problem where the agent is tasked with modulating the power injected into the plasma to achieve a target pressure. To assess the performance of BARL in solving MDPs quickly, we assembled a group of reinforcement learning algorithms that represent the state of the art in solving continuous MDPs. We compare against model-based algorithms PILCO [7], PETS [2], model-predictive control with a GP (MPC), and uncertainty sampling with a GP (), as well as model-free algorithms SAC [3], TD3 [8], and PPO [9].


Should I use offline RL or imitation learning?

AIHub

Figure 1: Summary of our recommendations for when a practitioner should BC and various imitation learning style methods, and when they should use offline RL approaches. Offline reinforcement learning allows learning policies from previously collected data, which has profound implications for applying RL in domains where running trial-and-error learning is impractical or dangerous, such as safety-critical settings like autonomous driving or medical treatment planning. In such scenarios, online exploration is simply too risky, but offline RL methods can learn effective policies from logged data collected by humans or heuristically designed controllers. Prior learning-based control methods have also approached learning from existing data as imitation learning: if the data is generally "good enough," simply copying the behavior in the data can lead to good results, and if it's not good enough, then filtering or reweighting the data and then copying can work well. Several recent works suggest that this is a viable alternative to modern offline RL methods.


Designing societally beneficial Reinforcement Learning (RL) systems

Robohub

Deep reinforcement learning (DRL) is transitioning from a research field focused on game playing to a technology with real-world applications. Notable examples include DeepMind's work on controlling a nuclear reactor or on improving Youtube video compression, or Tesla attempting to use a method inspired by MuZero for autonomous vehicle behavior planning. But the exciting potential for real world applications of RL should also come with a healthy dose of caution – for example RL policies are well known to be vulnerable to exploitation, and methods for safe and robust policy development are an active area of research. At the same time as the emergence of powerful RL systems in the real world, the public and researchers are expressing an increased appetite for fair, aligned, and safe machine learning systems. The focus of these research efforts to date has been to account for shortcomings of datasets or supervised learning practices that can harm individuals.


Artificiel Inteligence Free Structure Metasurface Optimization

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Metasurface refers to a nano-optical device that achieves unprecedented properties of light using a structure much smaller than the wavelength of light. Nano-optical devices control the characteristics of light at the micro level, and can be used for LiDAR beam steering devices used for autonomous driving, ultra-high-resolution imaging technology, optical properties control of light emitting devices used in displays, and hologram generation. . Recently, as the expected performance of a nano-optical device increases, interest in optimizing a device having a free structure in order to achieve a performance far exceeding that of the device structure in the past is increasing. This is the first case of solving a problem with a large design space such as a free structure by applying reinforcement learning.


Deep reinforcement learning for self-tuning laser source of dissipative solitons - Scientific Reports

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Increasing complexity of modern laser systems, mostly originated from the nonlinear dynamics of radiation, makes control of their operation more and more challenging, calling for development of new approaches in laser engineering. Machine learning methods, providing proven tools for identification, control, and data analytics of various complex systems, have been recently applied to mode-locked fiber lasers with the special focus on three key areas: self-starting, system optimization and characterization. However, the development of the machine learning algorithms for a particular laser system, while being an interesting research problem, is a demanding task requiring arduous efforts and tuning a large number of hyper-parameters in the laboratory arrangements. It is not obvious that this learning can be smoothly transferred to systems that differ from the specific laser used for the algorithm development by design or by varying environmental parameters. Here we demonstrate that a deep reinforcement learning (DRL) approach, based on trials and errors and sequential decisions, can be successfully used for control of the generation of dissipative solitons in mode-locked fiber laser system. We have shown the capability of deep Q-learning algorithm to generalize knowledge about the laser system in order to find conditions for stable pulse generation. Region of stable generation was transformed by changing the pumping power of the laser cavity, while tunable spectral filter was used as a control tool. Deep Q-learning algorithm is suited to learn the trajectory of adjusting spectral filter parameters to stable pulsed regime relying on the state of output radiation. Our results confirm the potential of deep reinforcement learning algorithm to control a nonlinear laser system with a feed-back. We also demonstrate that fiber mode-locked laser systems generating data at high speed present a fruitful photonic test-beds for various machine learning concepts based on large datasets.