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Deep Reinforcement Learning for Chatbots Using Clustered Actions and Human-Likeness Rewards

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Training chatbots using the reinforcement learning paradigm is challenging due to high-dimensional states, infinite action spaces and the difficulty in specifying the reward function. We address such problems using clustered actions instead of infinite actions, and a simple but promising reward function based on human-likeness scores derived from human-human dialogue data. We train Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL) agents using chitchat data in raw text---without any manual annotations. Experimental results using different splits of training data report the following. First, that our agents learn reasonable policies in the environments they get familiarised with, but their performance drops substantially when they are exposed to a test set of unseen dialogues. Second, that the choice of sentence embedding size between 100 and 300 dimensions is not significantly different on test data. Third, that our proposed human-likeness rewards are reasonable for training chatbots as long as they use lengthy dialogue histories of >=10 sentences.


A Deep Reinforcement Learning Chatbot

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We present MILABOT: a deep reinforcement learning chatbot developed by the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA) for the Amazon Alexa Prize competition. MILABOT is capable of conversing with humans on popular small talk topics through both speech and text. The system consists of an ensemble of natural language generation and retrieval models, including template-based models, bag-of-words models, sequence-to-sequence neural network and latent variable neural network models. By applying reinforcement learning to crowdsourced data and real-world user interactions, the system has been trained to select an appropriate response from the models in its ensemble. The system has been evaluated through A/B testing with real-world users, where it performed significantly better than many competing systems. Due to its machine learning architecture, the system is likely to improve with additional data.


A Survey of Available Corpora for Building Data-Driven Dialogue Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

During the past decade, several areas of speech and language understanding have witnessed substantial breakthroughs from the use of data-driven models. In the area of dialogue systems, the trend is less obvious, and most practical systems are still built through significant engineering and expert knowledge. Nevertheless, several recent results suggest that data-driven approaches are feasible and quite promising. To facilitate research in this area, we have carried out a wide survey of publicly available datasets suitable for data-driven learning of dialogue systems. We discuss important characteristics of these datasets, how they can be used to learn diverse dialogue strategies, and their other potential uses. We also examine methods for transfer learning between datasets and the use of external knowledge. Finally, we discuss appropriate choice of evaluation metrics for the learning objective.