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Artificial Intelligence Course

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The short answer to What is Artificial Intelligence is that it depends on who you ask. A layman with a fleeting understanding of technology would link it to robots. They'd say Artificial Intelligence is a terminator like-figure that can act and think on its own. An AI researcher would say that it's a set of algorithms that can produce results without having to be explicitly instructed to do so. And they would all be right. AI courses at Great Learning provide you with an overview of the current implementation scenario in various industries. With an in-depth introduction to artificial intelligence, you can easily master the basics for a better future in the course.


Do Neural Networks Dream Visual Illusions? - Neuroscience News

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Summary: When convolutional neural networks are trained under experimental conditions, they are decided by the brightness and color of a visual image in similar ways to the human visual system. A convolutional neural network is a type of artificial neural network in which the neurons are organized into receptive fields in a very similar way to neurons in the visual cortex of a biological brain. Today, convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are found in a variety of autonomous systems (for example, face detection and recognition, autonomous vehicles, etc.). This type of network is highly effective in many artificial vision tasks, such as in image segmentation and classification, along with many other applications. Convolutional networks were inspired by the behaviour of the human visual system, particularly its basic structure formed by the concatenation of compound modules comprising a linear operation followed by a non-linear operation.


Why your brain is not a computer

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We are living through one of the greatest of scientific endeavours – the attempt to understand the most complex object in the universe, the brain. Scientists are accumulating vast amounts of data about structure and function in a huge array of brains, from the tiniest to our own. Tens of thousands of researchers are devoting massive amounts of time and energy to thinking about what brains do, and astonishing new technology is enabling us to both describe and manipulate that activity. We can now make a mouse remember something about a smell it has never encountered, turn a bad mouse memory into a good one, and even use a surge of electricity to change how people perceive faces. We are drawing up increasingly detailed and complex functional maps of the brain, human and otherwise. In some species, we can change the brain's very structure at will, altering the animal's behaviour as a result. Some of the most profound consequences of our growing mastery can be seen in our ability to enable a paralysed person to control a robotic arm with the power of their mind.


The link between CAPTCHAs and artificial general intelligence

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This article is part of our reviews of AI research papers, a series of posts that explore the latest findings in artificial intelligence. Creating machines that have the general problem–solving capabilities of human brains has been the holy grain of artificial intelligence scientists for decades. Our current AI methods either require a huge amount of data, or a very large number of hand-coded rules, and they're only suitable for very narrow domains. AGI, on the other hand, should be able to perform multiple tasks with little data and specific instructions. While approaches to creating AGI have shifted and evolved over the decades, one thing has remained constant: The human brain is proof that general intelligence does exist.


Can AI Enhance Human Intelligence?

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The future won't be made by either humans or machines alone, but by both, working together. Technologies modeled on how human brains work are already augmenting people's abilities, and will only get more influential as society gets used to these increasingly capable machines. Technology optimists have envisioned a world with rising human productivity and quality of life as Artificial Intelligence systems take over life's drudgery and administrivia, benefiting everyone. Pessimists, on the other hand, have warned that these advances could come at great cost in lost jobs and disrupted lives. And fearmongers worry that AI might eventually make human beings obsolete.


Brain Inspired Artificial Intelligence - GreatLearning

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We've been hearing the term Artificial Intelligence a lot in the last decade, some of us still suffer from the lack of a proper definition of AI. People usually define AI on the basis of different activities that they witness in their day to day lives, e.g, the computers playing chess or automated systems that drive a car, but on the other hand, we also use terms like human intelligence and universal intelligence. So the question arises, what is the differentiating factor between artificial general intelligence and artificial intelligence? Here's an exclusive conversation between neuroscience researcher and AI veteran Dileep George (Founder & CTO, Vicarious.ai) If one were to ask, what was the original goal of AI, the answer would be that the original goal of AI was to create software algorithms that are equivalent to or even smarter than human beings.


Why It's Notoriously Difficult to Compare AI and Human Perception

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Science fiction is becoming reality as increasingly intelligent machines are gradually emerging -- ones that not only specialize in things like chess, but that can also carry out higher-level reasoning, or even answer deep philosophical questions. For the past few decades, experts have been collectively bending their efforts toward the creation of such a human-like artificial intelligence, or a so-called "strong" or artificial general intelligence (AGI), which can learn to perform a wide range of tasks as easily as a human might. But while current AI development may take some inspiration from the neuroscience of the human brain, is it actually appropriate to compare the way AI processes information with the way humans do it? The answer to that question depends on how experiments are set up, and how AI models are structured and trained, according to new research from a team of German researchers from the University of Tübingen and other research institutes. The team's study suggests that because of the differences between the way AI and humans arrive at such decisions, any generalizations from such a comparison may not be completely reliable, especially if machines are used to automate critical tasks.


This "ridiculously accurate" (neural network) AI Can Tell if You Have Covid-19 Just by Listening to Your Cough - recognizing 98.5% of coughs from people with confirmed covid-19 cases, and 100% of coughs from asymptomatic people.

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A subreddit devoted to the field of Future(s) Studies and evidence-based speculation about the development of humanity, technology, and civilization. For details on the rules see the Rules Wiki. For details on moderation procedures, see the Transparency Wiki. If history studies our past and social sciences study our present, what is the study of our future? Future(s) Studies (colloquially called "future(s)" by many of the field's practitioners) is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to hypothesize the possible, probable, preferable, or alternative future(s).


Deep Neural Networks Help to Explain Living Brains

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In the winter of 2011, Daniel Yamins, a postdoctoral researcher in computational neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, would at times toil past midnight on his machine vision project. He was painstakingly designing a system that could recognize objects in pictures, regardless of variations in size, position and other properties -- something that humans do with ease. The system was a deep neural network, a type of computational device inspired by the neurological wiring of living brains. "I remember very distinctly the time when we found a neural network that actually solved the task," he said. It was 2 a.m., a tad too early to wake up his adviser, James DiCarlo, or other colleagues, so an excited Yamins took a walk in the cold Cambridge air. "I was really pumped," he said. It would have counted as a noteworthy accomplishment in artificial intelligence alone, one of many that would make neural networks the darlings of AI technology over the next few years.


Neural pathway crucial to successful rapid object recognition in primates

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MIT researchers have identified a brain pathway critical in enabling primates to effortlessly identify objects in their field of vision. The findings enrich existing models of the neural circuitry involved in visual perception and help to further unravel the computational code for solving object recognition in the primate brain. Led by Kohitij Kar, a postdoc at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research and Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, the study looked at an area called the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), which sends feedback signals to the inferior temporal (IT) cortex via a network of neurons. The main goal of this study was to test how the back-and-forth information processing of this circuitry -- that is, this recurrent neural network -- is essential to rapid object identification in primates. The current study, published in Neuron and available via open access, is a followup to prior work published by Kar and James DiCarlo, the Peter de Florez Professor of Neuroscience, the head of MIT's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and an investigator in the McGovern Institute and the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines.