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Artificial Intelligence at Nvidia - Two Current Use Cases

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Daniel Faggella is Head of Research at Emerj. Called upon by the United Nations, World Bank, INTERPOL, and leading enterprises, Daniel is a globally sought-after expert on the competitive strategy implications of AI for business and government leaders. NVIDIA is a multinational company known for its computing hardware, especially its graphics processing units (GPUs) and systems on chip units (SoCs) for mobile devices. The company went public on January 22, 1999. While the company remains focused on hardware production, it has implemented deep learning and AI into its GPUs and specific software, such as its autonomous driving platform. The company trades on the NASDAQ (symbol: NVDA) with a market cap of just above $418 billion and employs approximately 23,000 globally.


How War Led to AI Fighting Fake News

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War is the worst human invention that ruins lives and leaves unhealed wounds for many generations. The wars of the past Millennium had at least some honesty in them in the way that they were declared, and it was clear who was against whom. However, modern-day warfare is different. The informational war is a huge portion of the ongoing war between Ukraine and Russia, with a lot of fake news that manipulates public opinion. The government of Russia has deployed entire networks of TV channels that target Western audiences, and now they are heavily utilizing them to change the world's opinion about Ukraine, make false claims about it, and convince that Russia is not killing people but "saving them."


A deep learning framework to estimate the pose of robotic arms and predict their movements

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As robots are gradually introduced into various real-world environments, developers and roboticists will need to ensure that they can safely operate around humans. In recent years, they have introduced various approaches for estimating the positions and predicting the movements of robots in real-time. Researchers at the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco in Brazil have recently created a new deep learning model to estimate the pose of robotic arms and predict their movements. This model, introduced in a paper pre-published on arXiv, is specifically designed to enhance the safety of robots while they are collaborating or interacting with humans. "Motivated by the need to anticipate accidents during human-robot interaction (HRI), we explore a framework that improves the safety of people working in close proximity to robots," Djamel H. Sadok, one of the researchers who carried out the study, told TechXplore.


You better know what Artificial Intelligence is since it is here to stay

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Artificial Intelligence is making waves in the tech world. It's the next exciting frontier, and it's already transforming industries from healthcare to finance. But what is artificial intelligence? To answer those questions, let's dive into the basic concepts of AI: machine learning and deep learning.


AI system that mimics human gaze could be used to detect cancer

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A cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI) system that can accurately predict the areas of an image where a person is most likely to look has been created by scientists at Cardiff University. Based on the mechanics of the human brain and its ability to distinguish between different parts of an image, the researchers say the novel system more accurately represents human vision than anything that has gone before. Applications of the new system range from robotics, multimedia communication and video surveillance to automated image editing and finding tumors in medical images. The Multimedia Computing Research Group at Cardiff University are now planning to test the system by helping radiologists to find lesions within medical images, with the overall goal of improving the speed, accuracy and sensitivity of medical diagnostics. The system has been presented in the journal Neurocomputing.


Flawed AI makes robots racist, sexist

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The work, led by Johns Hopkins University, Georgia Institute of Technology, and University of Washington researchers, is believed to be the first to show that robots loaded with an accepted and widely-used model operate with significant gender and racial biases. The work is set to be presented and published this week at the 2022 Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency. "The robot has learned toxic stereotypes through these flawed neural network models," said author Andrew Hundt, a postdoctoral fellow at Georgia Tech who co-conducted the work as a PhD student working in Johns Hopkins' Computational Interaction and Robotics Laboratory. "We're at risk of creating a generation of racist and sexist robots, but people and organizations have decided it's OK to create these products without addressing the issues." Those building artificial intelligence models to recognize humans and objects often turn to vast datasets available for free on the Internet.


How AI is going to affect the legal industry?

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Yes, it's not technology because, At its core, AI is the Ideology of teaching computers how to "learn, reason, perceive, infer, communicate, and make decisions like humans do." The initial goal is called machine learning, where the machine (a computer) begins to make decisions with minimal programming. Instead of manually writing rules for how the computer should interpret a set of data, machine learning algorithms (i.e., sets of instructions for solving particular problems) allow the computer to determine the rules itself. Beyond machine learning lies an even bigger goal, deep learning. Deep learning uses more advanced algorithms to perform more abstract tasks such as recognizing images and detecting the early stage of the disease and saving millions of lives.


A Microsoft custom data type for efficient inference - Microsoft Research

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AI is taking on an increasingly important role in many Microsoft products, such as Bing and Office 365. In some cases, it's being used to power outward-facing features like semantic search in Microsoft Word or intelligent answers in Bing, and deep neural networks (DNNs) are one key to powering these features. One aspect of DNNs is inference--once these networks are trained, they use inference to make judgments about unknown information based on prior learning. In Bing, for example, DNN inference enables multiple search scenarios including feature extraction, captioning, question answering, and ranking, which are all important tasks for customers to get accurate, fast responses to their search queries. These scenarios in Bing have stringent latency requirements and need to happen at an extremely large scale.


But how does AI actually Work?

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Machine Learning: A specific application of AI that lets computer systems, programs, or applications learn automatically and develop better results based on experience, all without being programmed to do so. Machine Learning allows AI to find patterns in data, uncover insights, and improve the results of whatever task the system has been set out to achieve. Deep Learning: A specific type of machine learning that allows AI to learn and improve by processing data. Deep Learning uses artificial neural networks which mimic biological neural networks in the human brain to process information, find connections between the data, and come up with inferences, or results based on positive and negative reinforcement. Neural Networks: A process that repeatedly analyses data sets to find associations and interpret meaning from undefined data.


Human-centred mechanism design with Democratic AI

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Building artificial intelligence (AI) that aligns with human values is an unsolved problem. Here we developed a human-in-the-loop research pipeline called Democratic AI, in which reinforcement learning is used to design a social mechanism that humans prefer by majority. A large group of humans played an online investment game that involved deciding whether to keep a monetary endowment or to share it with others for collective benefit. Shared revenue was returned to players under two different redistribution mechanisms, one designed by the AI and the other by humans. The AI discovered a mechanism that redressed initial wealth imbalance, sanctioned free riders and successfully won the majority vote. By optimising for human preferences, Democratic AI offers a proof of concept for value-aligned policy innovation.