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15 Best Udacity Machine Learning Courses

#artificialintelligence

This is an intermediate-level free artificial intelligence course. This course will teach the basics of modern AI as well as some of the representative applications of AI including machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, robotics, computer vision, and natural language processing. To understand this course, you should have some previous understanding of probability theory and linear algebra.


Empowering Things with Intelligence: A Survey of the Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities in Artificial Intelligence of Things

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the Internet of Things (IoT) era, billions of sensors and devices collect and process data from the environment, transmit them to cloud centers, and receive feedback via the internet for connectivity and perception. However, transmitting massive amounts of heterogeneous data, perceiving complex environments from these data, and then making smart decisions in a timely manner are difficult. Artificial intelligence (AI), especially deep learning, is now a proven success in various areas including computer vision, speech recognition, and natural language processing. AI introduced into the IoT heralds the era of artificial intelligence of things (AIoT). This paper presents a comprehensive survey on AIoT to show how AI can empower the IoT to make it faster, smarter, greener, and safer. Specifically, we briefly present the AIoT architecture in the context of cloud computing, fog computing, and edge computing. Then, we present progress in AI research for IoT from four perspectives: perceiving, learning, reasoning, and behaving. Next, we summarize some promising applications of AIoT that are likely to profoundly reshape our world. Finally, we highlight the challenges facing AIoT and some potential research opportunities.


What's happened in MOOC Posts Analysis, Knowledge Tracing and Peer Feedbacks? A Review

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Learning Management Systems (LMS) and Educational Data Mining (EDM) are two important parts of online educational environment with the former being a centralised web-based information systems where the learning content is managed and learning activities are organised (Stone and Zheng,2014) and latter focusing on using data mining techniques for the analysis of data so generated. As part of this work, we present a literature review of three major tasks of EDM (See section 2), by identifying shortcomings and existing open problems, and a Blumenfield chart (See section 3). The consolidated set of papers and resources so used are released in https://github.com/manikandan-ravikiran/cs6460-Survey. The coverage statistics and review matrix of the survey are as shown in Figure 1 & Table 1 respectively. Acronym expansions are added in the Appendix Section 4.1.


What Should I Learn First: Introducing LectureBank for NLP Education and Prerequisite Chain Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recent years have witnessed the rising popularity of Natural Language Processing (NLP) and related fields such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML). Many online courses and resources are available even for those without a strong background in the field. Often the student is curious about a specific topic but does not quite know where to begin studying. To answer the question of "what should one learn first," we apply an embedding-based method to learn prerequisite relations for course concepts in the domain of NLP. We introduce LectureBank, a dataset containing 1,352 English lecture files collected from university courses which are each classified according to an existing taxonomy as well as 208 manually-labeled prerequisite relation topics, which is publicly available. The dataset will be useful for educational purposes such as lecture preparation and organization as well as applications such as reading list generation. Additionally, we experiment with neural graph-based networks and non-neural classifiers to learn these prerequisite relations from our dataset.


Online Learning in Kernelized Markov Decision Processes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider online learning for minimizing regret in unknown, episodic Markov decision processes (MDPs) with continuous states and actions. We develop variants of the UCRL and posterior sampling algorithms that employ nonparametric Gaussian process priors to generalize across the state and action spaces. When the transition and reward functions of the true MDP are either sampled from Gaussian process priors (fully Bayesian setting) or are members of the associated Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces of functions induced by symmetric psd kernels (frequentist setting), we show that the algorithms enjoy sublinear regret bounds. The bounds are in terms of explicit structural parameters of the kernels, namely a novel generalization of the information gain metric from kernelized bandit, and highlight the influence of transition and reward function structure on the learning performance. Our results are applicable to multi-dimensional state and action spaces with composite kernel structures, and generalize results from the literature on kernelized bandits, and the adaptive control of parametric linear dynamical systems with quadratic costs.