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Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning – Path to Intelligent Automation

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With evolving technologies, intelligent automation has become a top priority for many executives in 2020. Forrester predicts the industry will continue to grow from $250 million in 2016 to $12 billion in 2023. With more companies identifying and implementation the Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), there is seen a gradual reshaping of the enterprise. Industries across the globe integrate AI and ML with businesses to enable swift changes to key processes like marketing, customer relationships and management, product development, production and distribution, quality check, order fulfilment, resource management, and much more. AI includes a wide range of technologies such as machine learning, deep learning (DL), optical character recognition (OCR), natural language processing (NLP), voice recognition, and so on, which creates intelligent automation for organizations across multiple industrial domains when combined with robotics.


This chapter on the future of Artificial Intelligence was written by Artificial Intelligence

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In this version of the future, people will still have a role working alongside smart systems: either the technology will not be good enough to take over completely, or the decisions will have human consequences that are too important to hand over completely to a machine. There's just one problem: when humans and semi-intelligent systems try to work together, things do not always turn out well. Like almost all of today's autonomous cars, a back-up driver was there to step in if the software failed. The so-called Level 3 system is designed to drive itself in most situations but hand control back to a human when confronted by situations it cannot handle. "If you're only needed for a minute a day, it won't work," says Stefan Heck, chief executive of Nauto, a US start-up whose technology is used to prevent professional drivers from becoming distracted. Without careful design, the intelligent systems making their way into the world could provoke a backlash against the technology.


A new way to train AI systems could keep them safer from hackers

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The context: One of the best unsolved defects of deep knowing is its vulnerability to so-called adversarial attacks. When included to the input of an AI system, these perturbations, apparently random or undetected to the human eye, can make things go totally awry. Stickers tactically put on a stop indication, for instance, can deceive a self-driving automobile into seeing a speed limitation indication for 45 miles per hour, while sticker labels on a roadway can puzzle a Tesla into drifting into the incorrect lane. Safety important: Most adversarial research study concentrates on image acknowledgment systems, however deep-learning-based image restoration systems are susceptible too. This is especially uncomfortable in healthcare, where the latter are typically utilized to rebuild medical images like CT or MRI scans from x-ray information.


How AI is Changing the Mobility Landscape - DATAVERSITY

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Click here to learn more about Gilad David Maayan. There are a significant number of investments in the automotive industry nowadays. The majority of these investments focus on artificial intelligence (AI) and the optimization of self-driving technology. Meanwhile, new mobility systems and players are making their way into the automotive market. Tesla is trying to improve its autopilot system, Uber is testing robo-taxis, and Google is developing self-driving cars.


How Is Amazon Aiming To Set A Footprint In The Self-driving Industry?

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Amazon recently bought up a self-driving autonomous ride-hailing startup Zoox, which is being claimed as the most ambitious step that the tech giant has taken in the recent past. Reportedly a $1.2 billion deal, the acquisition of the Robo-taxi company is not just to build upon its capabilities to deliver packages but actively set foot in the autonomous driving industry. While Amazon has invested heavily in developing drones or autonomous delivery robots in the past, its investment in self-driving vehicles has recently gained traction. Some of the other ventures of the company have been in self-driving truck Embark when CNBC reported that it had been hauling Amazon cargo on some of its test runs. For instance, in drones, Amazon has designed a future delivery system to safely deliver packages to customers in a short period of time.


Helm.ai raises $13M on its unsupervised learning approach to driverless car AI – TechCrunch

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Four years ago, mathematician Vlad Voroninski saw an opportunity to remove some of the bottlenecks in the development of autonomous vehicle technology thanks to breakthroughs in deep learning. Now, Helm.ai, the startup he co-founded in 2016 with Tudor Achim, is coming out of stealth with an announcement that it has raised $13 million in a seed round that includes investment from A.Capital Ventures, Amplo, Binnacle Partners, Sound Ventures, Fontinalis Partners and SV Angel. More than a dozen angel investors also participated, including Berggruen Holdings founder Nicolas Berggruen, Quora co-founders Charlie Cheever and Adam D'Angelo, professional NBA player Kevin Durant, Gen. David Petraeus, Matician co-founder and CEO Navneet Dalal, Quiet Capital managing partner Lee Linden and Robinhood co-founder Vladimir Tenev, among others. Helm.ai will put the $13 million in seed funding toward advanced engineering and R&D and hiring more employees, as well as locking in and fulfilling deals with customers. Helm.ai is focused solely on the software.


Inside the lab where Waymo is building the brains for its driverless cars

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Right now, a minivan with no one behind the steering wheel is driving through a suburb of Phoenix, Arizona. And while that may seem alarming, the company that built the "brain" powering the car's autonomy wants to assure you that it's totally safe. Waymo, the self-driving unit of Alphabet, is the only company in the world to have fully driverless vehicles on public roads today. That was made possible by a sophisticated set of neural networks powered by machine learning about which very is little is known -- until now. For the first time, Waymo is lifting the curtain on what is arguably the most important (and most difficult-to-understand) piece of its technology stack. The company, which is ahead in the self-driving car race by most metrics, confidently asserts that its cars have the most advanced brains on the road today. Anyone can buy a bunch of cameras and LIDAR sensors, slap them on a car, and call it autonomous. But training a self-driving car to behave like a human driver, or, more importantly, to drive better than a human, is on the bleeding edge of artificial intelligence research.


System trains driverless cars in simulation before they hit the road

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A simulation system invented at MIT to train driverless cars creates a photorealistic world with infinite steering possibilities, helping the cars learn to navigate a host of worse-case scenarios before cruising down real streets. Control systems, or "controllers," for autonomous vehicles largely rely on real-world datasets of driving trajectories from human drivers. From these data, they learn how to emulate safe steering controls in a variety of situations. But real-world data from hazardous "edge cases," such as nearly crashing or being forced off the road or into other lanes, are -- fortunately -- rare. Some computer programs, called "simulation engines," aim to imitate these situations by rendering detailed virtual roads to help train the controllers to recover.


The Role Of Human Judgment As A Presumed Integral Ingredient For Achieving True AI

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Is human judgment the crucial missing link needed to achieve true AI? Is the embodiment of human judgment a required ingredient in achieving true AI? It is a rather seemingly simple question to proffer, though any mindful answer is likely to be notably elongated. Slightly restating the question, in order for AI to become a vaunted version of AI, which let's say we might all collegially agree is demarked as the equivalent of human-like intelligence, this weighty question is asking whether there needs to be some means to encompass or include what we variously describe or denote as "human judgment" for AI to be true AI. If you say that yes, of course, the only true AI is the type of AI that showcases its own variant of human judgment, you are then putting forth a challenge and a quest to figure out what human judgment portends and how to somehow get that thing or capability into AI systems.


Alphabet's Next Billion-Dollar Business: 10 Industries To Watch - CB Insights Research

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Alphabet is using its dominance in the search and advertising spaces -- and its massive size -- to find its next billion-dollar business. From healthcare to smart cities to banking, here are 10 industries the tech giant is targeting. With growing threats from its big tech peers Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, Alphabet's drive to disrupt has become more urgent than ever before. The conglomerate is leveraging the power of its first moats -- search and advertising -- and its massive scale to find its next billion-dollar businesses. To protect its current profits and grow more broadly, Alphabet is edging its way into industries adjacent to the ones where it has already found success and entering new spaces entirely to find opportunities for disruption. Evidence of Alphabet's efforts is showing up in several major industries. For example, the company is using artificial intelligence to understand the causes of diseases like diabetes and cancer and how to treat them. Those learnings feed into community health projects that serve the public, and also help Alphabet's effort to build smart cities. Elsewhere, Alphabet is using its scale to build a better virtual assistant and own the consumer electronics software layer. It's also leveraging that scale to build a new kind of Google Pay-operated checking account. In this report, we examine how Alphabet and its subsidiaries are currently working to disrupt 10 major industries -- from electronics to healthcare to transportation to banking -- and what else might be on the horizon. Within the world of consumer electronics, Alphabet has already found dominance with one product: Android. Mobile operating system market share globally is controlled by the Linux-based OS that Google acquired in 2005 to fend off Microsoft and Windows Mobile. Today, however, Alphabet's consumer electronics strategy is being driven by its work in artificial intelligence. Google is building some of its own hardware under the Made by Google line -- including the Pixel smartphone, the Chromebook, and the Google Home -- but the company is doing more important work on hardware-agnostic software products like Google Assistant (which is even available on iOS).