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Learning Spark: Lightning-Fast Data Analytics: Damji, Jules S., Wenig, Brooke, Das, Tathagata, Lee, Denny: 9781492050049: Books

#artificialintelligence

Most developers who grapple with big data are data engineers, data scientists, or machine learning engineers. This book is aimed at those professionals who are looking to use Spark to scale their applications to handle massive amounts of data. In particular, data engineers will learn how to use Spark's Structured APIs to perform complex data exploration and analysis on both batch and streaming data; use Spark SQL for interactive queries; use Spark's built-in and external data sources to read, refine, and write data in different file formats as part of their extract, transform, and load (ETL) tasks; and build reliable data lakes with Spark and the open source Delta Lake table format. For data scientists and machine learning engineers, Spark's MLlib library offers many common algorithms to build distributed machine learning models. We will cover how to build pipelines with MLlib, best practices for distributed machine learning, how to use Spark to scale single-node models, and how to manage and deploy these models using the open source library MLflow.


Forecasting: theory and practice

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Forecasting has always been at the forefront of decision making and planning. The uncertainty that surrounds the future is both exciting and challenging, with individuals and organisations seeking to minimise risks and maximise utilities. The large number of forecasting applications calls for a diverse set of forecasting methods to tackle real-life challenges. This article provides a non-systematic review of the theory and the practice of forecasting. We provide an overview of a wide range of theoretical, state-of-the-art models, methods, principles, and approaches to prepare, produce, organise, and evaluate forecasts. We then demonstrate how such theoretical concepts are applied in a variety of real-life contexts. We do not claim that this review is an exhaustive list of methods and applications. However, we wish that our encyclopedic presentation will offer a point of reference for the rich work that has been undertaken over the last decades, with some key insights for the future of forecasting theory and practice. Given its encyclopedic nature, the intended mode of reading is non-linear. We offer cross-references to allow the readers to navigate through the various topics. We complement the theoretical concepts and applications covered by large lists of free or open-source software implementations and publicly-available databases.