Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


Artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Deep learning[133] uses several layers of neurons between the network's inputs and outputs. The multiple layers can progressively extract higher-level features from the raw input. For example, in image processing, lower layers may identify edges, while higher layers may identify the concepts relevant to a human such as digits or letters or faces.[134] Deep learning has drastically improved the performance of programs in many important subfields of artificial intelligence, including computer vision, speech recognition, image classification[135] and others. Deep learning often uses convolutional neural networks for many or all of its layers.


Ordr nabs $40M to monitor connected devices for anomalies – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

In 2015, there were approximately 3.5 billion internet of things (IoT) devices in use. Today, the number stands around 35 billion, and is expected to eclipse 75 billion by 2025. IoT devices range from connected blood pressure monitors to industrial temperature sensors, and they're indispensable. The challenge was the driving force behind Ordr, a startup focused on network-level device security. Pandian Gnanaprakasam and Sheausong Yang -- who between them had tenures at Cisco, Aruba Networks, and AT&T Bell Labs -- co-founded Ordr in 2015 to address what they call the "visibility gap" in enterprise networks.


AI, ML, & Cybersecurity: Here's What FDA May Soon Be Asking

#artificialintelligence

FDA has released a number of documents that could help clarify its expectations for artificial intelligence, machine learning, and cybersecurity. These include Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML)-Based Software as a Medical Device (SaMD) Action Plan, published in January 2021; Good Machine Learning Practice for Medical Device Development: Guiding Principles, published in October 2021; and the just-released draft guidance, Cybersecurity in Medical Devices: Quality System Considerations and Content of Premarket Submissions. The AI/ML action plan provides a "more tailored regulatory framework for AI/ML," explained Pavlovic. She referred to FDA's 2019 discussion paper, Proposed Regulatory Framework for Modifications to Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML)-Based Software as a Medical Device (SaMD) - Discussion Paper and Request for Feedback, which laid out a "total product lifecycle approach to AI/ML regulations with the understanding that AI/ML products can be iterated much more efficiently and quickly than a typical medical device implant product or something that isn't software based." This is "because there is an opportunity to add additional data to training sets on which the products were originally formulated," she said.


100 of the world's among most noteworthy artificial intelligence companies are here (1)

#artificialintelligence

The following is the "100 most noteworthy artificial intelligence companies" compiled by the AI generation (tencentAI) (in alphabetical order by company name): Inspired by recent discoveries about the way the brain processes information, Cortical.io's Retina engine converts language into semantic fingerprints, and then compares the semantic relatedness of any two texts by comparing the degree of overlap of the fingerprints. CrowdFlower is a human intervention training platform for data science teams that helps clients generate high-quality custom training data. The CrowdFlower platform supports a range of use cases including self-driving cars, personal assistants, medical image tagging, content classification, social data analysis, CRM data improvement, product classification and search relevance, and more. Headquartered in San Francisco, CrowdFlower's clients include Fortune 500 and data-driven companies.


The New Intelligence Game

#artificialintelligence

The relevance of the video is that the browser identified the application being used by the IAI as Google Earth and, according to the OSC 2006 report, the Arabic-language caption reads Islamic Army in Iraq/The Military Engineering Unit – Preparations for Rocket Attack, the video was recorded in 5/1/2006, we provide, in Appendix A, a reproduction of the screenshot picture made available in the OSC report. Now, prior to the release of this video demonstration of the use of Google Earth to plan attacks, in accordance with the OSC 2006 report, in the OSC-monitored online forums, discussions took place on the use of Google Earth as a GEOINT tool for terrorist planning. On August 5, 2005 the user "Al-Illiktrony" posted a message to the Islamic Renewal Organization forum titled A Gift for the Mujahidin, a Program To Enable You to Watch Cities of the World Via Satellite, in this post the author dedicated Google Earth to the mujahidin brothers and to Shaykh Muhammad al-Mas'ari, the post was replied in the forum by "Al-Mushtaq al-Jannah" warning that Google programs retain complete information about their users. This is a relevant issue, however, there are two caveats, given the amount of Google Earth users, it may be difficult for Google to flag a jihadist using the functionality in time to prevent an attack plan, one possible solution would be for Google to flag computers based on searched websites and locations, for instance to flag computers that visit certain critical sites, but this is a problem when landmarks are used, furthermore, and this is the second caveat, one may not use one's own computer to produce the search or even mask the IP address. On October 3, 2005, as described in the OSC 2006 report, in a reply to a posting by Saddam Al-Arab on the Baghdad al-Rashid forum requesting the identification of a roughly sketched map, "Almuhannad" posted a link to a site that provided a free download of Google Earth, suggesting that the satellite imagery from Google's service could help identify the sketch.


State of AI Ethics Report (Volume 6, February 2022)

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This report from the Montreal AI Ethics Institute (MAIEI) covers the most salient progress in research and reporting over the second half of 2021 in the field of AI ethics. Particular emphasis is placed on an "Analysis of the AI Ecosystem", "Privacy", "Bias", "Social Media and Problematic Information", "AI Design and Governance", "Laws and Regulations", "Trends", and other areas covered in the "Outside the Boxes" section. The two AI spotlights feature application pieces on "Constructing and Deconstructing Gender with AI-Generated Art" as well as "Will an Artificial Intellichef be Cooking Your Next Meal at a Michelin Star Restaurant?". Given MAIEI's mission to democratize AI, submissions from external collaborators have featured, such as pieces on the "Challenges of AI Development in Vietnam: Funding, Talent and Ethics" and using "Representation and Imagination for Preventing AI Harms". The report is a comprehensive overview of what the key issues in the field of AI ethics were in 2021, what trends are emergent, what gaps exist, and a peek into what to expect from the field of AI ethics in 2022. It is a resource for researchers and practitioners alike in the field to set their research and development agendas to make contributions to the field of AI ethics.


Technology Ethics in Action: Critical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This special issue interrogates the meaning and impacts of "tech ethics": the embedding of ethics into digital technology research, development, use, and governance. In response to concerns about the social harms associated with digital technologies, many individuals and institutions have articulated the need for a greater emphasis on ethics in digital technology. Yet as more groups embrace the concept of ethics, critical discourses have emerged questioning whose ethics are being centered, whether "ethics" is the appropriate frame for improving technology, and what it means to develop "ethical" technology in practice. This interdisciplinary issue takes up these questions, interrogating the relationships among ethics, technology, and society in action. This special issue engages with the normative and contested notions of ethics itself, how ethics has been integrated with technology across domains, and potential paths forward to support more just and egalitarian technology. Rather than starting from philosophical theories, the authors in this issue orient their articles around the real-world discourses and impacts of tech ethics--i.e., tech ethics in action.


LiteLSTM Architecture for Deep Recurrent Neural Networks

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Long short-term memory (LSTM) is a robust recurrent neural network architecture for learning spatiotemporal sequential data. However, it requires significant computational power for learning and implementing from both software and hardware aspects. This paper proposes a novel LiteLSTM architecture based on reducing the computation components of the LSTM using the weights sharing concept to reduce the overall architecture cost and maintain the architecture performance. The proposed LiteLSTM can be significant for learning big data where time-consumption is crucial such as the security of IoT devices and medical data. Moreover, it helps to reduce the CO2 footprint. The proposed model was evaluated and tested empirically on two different datasets from computer vision and cybersecurity domains.


Systems Challenges for Trustworthy Embodied Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A new generation of increasingly autonomous and self-learning systems, which we call embodied systems, is about to be developed. When deploying these systems into a real-life context we face various engineering challenges, as it is crucial to coordinate the behavior of embodied systems in a beneficial manner, ensure their compatibility with our human-centered social values, and design verifiably safe and reliable human-machine interaction. We are arguing that raditional systems engineering is coming to a climacteric from embedded to embodied systems, and with assuring the trustworthiness of dynamic federations of situationally aware, intent-driven, explorative, ever-evolving, largely non-predictable, and increasingly autonomous embodied systems in uncertain, complex, and unpredictable real-world contexts. We are also identifying a number of urgent systems challenges for trustworthy embodied systems, including robust and human-centric AI, cognitive architectures, uncertainty quantification, trustworthy self-integration, and continual analysis and assurance.


A Comprehensive Survey on Radio Frequency (RF) Fingerprinting: Traditional Approaches, Deep Learning, and Open Challenges

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Fifth generation (5G) networks and beyond envisions massive Internet of Things (IoT) rollout to support disruptive applications such as extended reality (XR), augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR), industrial automation, autonomous driving, and smart everything which brings together massive and diverse IoT devices occupying the radio frequency (RF) spectrum. Along with spectrum crunch and throughput challenges, such a massive scale of wireless devices exposes unprecedented threat surfaces. RF fingerprinting is heralded as a candidate technology that can be combined with cryptographic and zero-trust security measures to ensure data privacy, confidentiality, and integrity in wireless networks. Motivated by the relevance of this subject in the future communication networks, in this work, we present a comprehensive survey of RF fingerprinting approaches ranging from a traditional view to the most recent deep learning (DL) based algorithms. Existing surveys have mostly focused on a constrained presentation of the wireless fingerprinting approaches, however, many aspects remain untold. In this work, however, we mitigate this by addressing every aspect - background on signal intelligence (SIGINT), applications, relevant DL algorithms, systematic literature review of RF fingerprinting techniques spanning the past two decades, discussion on datasets, and potential research avenues - necessary to elucidate this topic to the reader in an encyclopedic manner.