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Beginners Learning Path for Machine Learning - KDnuggets

#artificialintelligence

Made your mind towards machine learning but are confused so much that where to get started? I faced the same confusion that what should be a good start? Should I learn Python or go for R? Mathematics was always a scary part for me, and I was always worried that from where should I learn math? I was also worried about how I should get a strong basis for Machine Learning. Anyway, you should be congratulated that at least you have made your mind.


How 'Learning Engineering' Hopes to Speed Up Education - EdSurge News

CMU School of Computer Science

This story was published in partnership with The Moonshot Catalog. In the late 1960s, Nobel Prize-winning economist Herbert Simon posed the following thought exercise: Imagine you are an alien from Mars visiting a college on Earth, and you spend a day observing how professors teach their students. Simon argued that you would describe the process as "outrageous." "If we visited an organization responsible for designing, building and maintaining large bridges, we would expect to find employed there a number of trained and experienced professional engineers, thoroughly educated in mechanics and the other laws of nature that determine whether a bridge will stand or fall," he wrote in a 1967 issue of Education Record. "We find no one with a professional knowledge in the laws of learning, or the techniques for applying them," he wrote. Teaching at colleges is often done without any formal training. Mimicry of others who are equally untrained, instinct, and what feels right tend to provide the guidance. Reading back over a textbook or taking lecture notes with a highlighter at the ready is often done by students, for instance, but these practices have proven of limited merit, and in some cases even counterproductive in aiding recall. And while many educators believe that word problems in math class are tougher for students to grasp than ones with mathematical notation, research shows that the opposite is true.


5 Best Courses to Learn Mathematics for Machine Learning

#artificialintelligence

So you want to learn the Mathematics for Machine Learning? Well, for Machine Learning or Deep Learning and AI, a thorough mathematical understanding is not an option. I know the options out there; prerequisites and the skills you need to become successful in Machine Learning and AI. If you want to learn Machine Learning, these classes will help you to master the mathematical foundation required for writing programs and algorithms for Machine Learning, Deep Learning and AI. My goal in this piece is to help you find the resources to gain good intuition and get you the hands-on experience you need with coding neural nets, stochastic gradient descent, and principal component analysis.


Teaching Responsible Data Science: Charting New Pedagogical Territory

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Although numerous ethics courses are available, with many focusing specifically on technology and computer ethics, pedagogical approaches employed in these courses rely exclusively on texts rather than on software development or data analysis. Technical students often consider these courses unimportant and a distraction from the "real" material. To develop instructional materials and methodologies that are thoughtful and engaging, we must strive for balance: between texts and coding, between critique and solution, and between cutting-edge research and practical applicability. Finding such balance is particularly difficult in the nascent field of responsible data science (RDS), where we are only starting to understand how to interface between the intrinsically different methodologies of engineering and social sciences. In this paper we recount a recent experience in developing and teaching an RDS course to graduate and advanced undergraduate students in data science. We then dive into an area that is critically important to RDS -- transparency and interpretability of machine-assisted decision-making, and tie this area to the needs of emerging RDS curricula. Recounting our own experience, and leveraging literature on pedagogical methods in data science and beyond, we propose the notion of an "object-to-interpret-with". We link this notion to "nutritional labels" -- a family of interpretability tools that are gaining popularity in RDS research and practice. With this work we aim to contribute to the nascent area of RDS education, and to inspire others in the community to come together to develop a deeper theoretical understanding of the pedagogical needs of RDS, and contribute concrete educational materials and methodologies that others can use. All course materials are publicly available at https://dataresponsibly.github.io/courses.


A 20-Year Community Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence Research in the US

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) have produced formidable technologies that are providing immense benefit to industry, government, and society. AI systems can now translate across multiple languages, identify objects in images and video, streamline manufacturing processes, and control cars. The deployment of AI systems has not only created a trillion-dollar industry that is projected to quadruple in three years, but has also exposed the need to make AI systems fair, explainable, trustworthy, and secure. Future AI systems will rightfully be expected to reason effectively about the world in which they (and people) operate, handling complex tasks and responsibilities effectively and ethically, engaging in meaningful communication, and improving their awareness through experience. Achieving the full potential of AI technologies poses research challenges that require a radical transformation of the AI research enterprise, facilitated by significant and sustained investment. These are the major recommendations of a recent community effort coordinated by the Computing Community Consortium and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence to formulate a Roadmap for AI research and development over the next two decades.


A Clinical Approach to Training Effective Data Scientists

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Like medicine, psychology, or education, data science is fundamentally an applied discipline, with most students who receive advanced degrees in the field going on to work on practical problems. Unlike these disciplines, however, data science education remains heavily focused on theory and methods, and practical coursework typically revolves around cleaned or simplified data sets that have little analog in professional applications. We believe that the environment in which new data scientists are trained should more accurately reflect that in which they will eventually practice and propose here a data science master's degree program that takes inspiration from the residency model used in medicine. Students in the suggested program would spend three years working on a practical problem with an industry, government, or nonprofit partner, supplemented with coursework in data science methods and theory. We also discuss how this program can also be implemented in shorter formats to augment existing professional masters programs in different disciplines. This approach to learning by doing is designed to fill gaps in our current approach to data science education and ensure that students develop the skills they need to practice data science in a professional context and under the many constraints imposed by that context.


How Widely Can Prediction Models be Generalized? An Analysis of Performance Prediction in Blended Courses

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Blended courses that mix in-person instruction with online platforms are increasingly popular in secondary education. These tools record a rich amount of data on students' study habits and social interactions. Prior research has shown that these metrics are correlated with students' performance in face to face classes. However, predictive models for blended courses are still limited and have not yet succeeded at early prediction or cross-class predictions even for repeated offerings of the same course. In this work, we use data from two offerings of two different undergraduate courses to train and evaluate predictive models on student performance based upon persistent student characteristics including study habits and social interactions. We analyze the performance of these models on the same offering, on different offerings of the same course, and across courses to see how well they generalize. We also evaluate the models on different segments of the courses to determine how early reliable predictions can be made. This work tells us in part how much data is required to make robust predictions and how cross-class data may be used, or not, to boost model performance. The results of this study will help us better understand how similar the study habits, social activities, and the teamwork styles are across semesters for students in each performance category. These trained models also provide an avenue to improve our existing support platforms to better support struggling students early in the semester with the goal of providing timely intervention.


Artificial Intelligence Projects with Python-HandsOn: 2-in-1

@machinelearnbot

Artificial Intelligence is one of the hottest fields in computer science right now and has taken the world by storm as a major field of research and development. Python has surfaced as a dominant language in AI/ML programming because of its simplicity and flexibility, as well as its great support for open source libraries such as Scikit-learn, Keras, spaCy, and TensorFlow. If you're a Python developer who wants to take first steps in the world of artificial intelligent solutions using easy-to-follow projects, then go for this learning path. This comprehensive 2-in-1 course is designed to teach you the fundamentals of deep learning and use them to build intelligent systems. You will solve real-world problems such as face detection, handwriting recognition, and more.


Complete Data Science guide -Keras library for deep learning

@machinelearnbot

Keras is an open source neural network library written in Python. It is capable of running on top of MXNet, Deep learning Tensorflow, CNTK, or Theano. Designed to enable fast experimentation with deep neural networks, it focuses on being minimal, modular, and extensible. This course provides a comprehensive expert level details in deep learning(Keras). We start by a brief recap of the most common concepts found in machine learning.