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Vendor focus: FrontierSI – Spatial Source

#artificialintelligence

… market studies on Digital Earth Australia and automation of Victoria’s Vegetation Mapping Through Machine Learning initiative.


Predicting the age of abalone from physical measurements Part 1 - Projects Based Learning

#artificialintelligence

Abalone is a common name for any of a group of small to very large sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Haliotidae. Other common names are ear shells, sea ears, and muttonfish or muttonshells in Australia, ormer in the UK, perlemoen in South Africa, and paua in New Zealand. The age of abalone is determined by cutting the shell through the cone, staining it, and counting the number of rings through a microscope a boring and time consuming task. Other measurements, which are easier to obtain, are used to predict the age. Given is the attribute name, attribute type, the measurement unit and a brief description.


TCS and DeakinCo. partner to address digital skills gap in Australia - The EE

#artificialintelligence

Sydney, Australia, 04 February, 2022 – Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) has entered a strategic partnership with DeakinCo., a division of Deakin University, to co-design a series of corporate learning programs to meet the growing demand of talent in emerging technologies such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, data analytics and robotics. The programs aim to help address the digital skills gap and accelerate the economic growth of Australia. The new partnership brings together Deakin's academic excellence and TCS' extensive industry networks and experience. The first program, to be piloted in early 2022, will focus on machine learning, which consists of three streams enabling senior executives, mid-management and practitioners to leverage the power of this emerging technology in their chosen profession. Each stream will be facilitated by academics and industry experts. The programs are designed to address specific capability gaps for businesses and will provide learners with an engaging experience that goes to the heart of the skills and knowledge required in these dynamic fields.


Online Assessment Misconduct Detection using Internet Protocol and Behavioural Classification

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

With the recent prevalence of remote education, academic assessments are often conducted online, leading to further concerns surrounding assessment misconducts. This paper investigates the potentials of online assessment misconduct (e-cheating) and proposes practical countermeasures against them. The mechanism for detecting the practices of online cheating is presented in the form of an e-cheating intelligent agent, comprising of an internet protocol (IP) detector and a behavioural monitor. The IP detector is an auxiliary detector which assigns randomised and unique assessment sets as an early procedure to reduce potential misconducts. The behavioural monitor scans for irregularities in assessment responses from the candidates, further reducing any misconduct attempts. This is highlighted through the proposal of the DenseLSTM using a deep learning approach. Additionally, a new PT Behavioural Database is presented and made publicly available. Experiments conducted on this dataset confirm the effectiveness of the DenseLSTM, resulting in classification accuracies of up to 90.7%.


An AI-based Solution for Enhancing Delivery of Digital Learning for Future Teachers

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

However, up until the COVID-19 pandemic caused a seismic shift in the education sector, few educational institutions had fully developed digital learning models in place and adoption of digital models was ad-hoc or only partially integrated alongside traditional teaching modes [1]. In the wake of the disruptive impact of the pandemic, the education sector and more importantly educators have had to move rapidly to take up digital solutions to continue delivering learning. At the most rudimentary level, this has meant moving to online teaching through platforms such as Zoom, Google, Teams and Interactive Whiteboards and delivering pre-recorded educational materials via Learning Management Systems (e.g., Echo). Digital learning is now simply part of the education landscape both in the traditional education sector as well as within the context of corporate and workplace learning. A key challenge future teachers face when delivering educational content via digital learning is to be able to assess what the learner knows and understands, the depths of that knowledge and understanding and any gaps in that learning. Assessment also occurs in the context of the cohort and relevant band or level of learning. The Teachers Guide to Assessment produced by the Australian Capital Territory Government [2] identified that teachers and learning designers were particularly challenged by the assessment process, and that new technologies have the potential to transform existing digital teaching and learning practices through refined information gathering and the ability to enhance the nature of learner feedback. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is part of the next generation of digital learning, enabling educators to create learning content, stream content to suit individual learner needs and access and in turn respond to data based on learner performance and feedback [3]. AI has the capacity to provide significant benefits to teachers to deliver nuanced and personalised experiences to learners.


Reinforcement Learning based Path Exploration for Sequential Explainable Recommendation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Recent advances in path-based explainable recommendation systems have attracted increasing attention thanks to the rich information provided by knowledge graphs. Most existing explainable recommendations only utilize static knowledge graphs and ignore the dynamic user-item evolutions, leading to less convincing and inaccurate explanations. Although there are some works that realize that modelling user's temporal sequential behaviour could boost the performance and explainability of the recommender systems, most of them either only focus on modelling user's sequential interactions within a path or independently and separately of the recommendation mechanism. In this paper, we propose a novel Temporal Meta-path Guided Explainable Recommendation leveraging Reinforcement Learning (TMER-RL), which utilizes reinforcement item-item path modelling between consecutive items with attention mechanisms to sequentially model dynamic user-item evolutions on dynamic knowledge graph for explainable recommendation. Compared with existing works that use heavy recurrent neural networks to model temporal information, we propose simple but effective neural networks to capture users' historical item features and path-based context to characterize the next purchased item. Extensive evaluations of TMER on two real-world datasets show state-of-the-art performance compared against recent strong baselines.


Randomized Classifiers vs Human Decision-Makers: Trustworthy AI May Have to Act Randomly and Society Seems to Accept This

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

As \emph{artificial intelligence} (AI) systems are increasingly involved in decisions affecting our lives, ensuring that automated decision-making is fair and ethical has become a top priority. Intuitively, we feel that akin to human decisions, judgments of artificial agents should necessarily be grounded in some moral principles. Yet a decision-maker (whether human or artificial) can only make truly ethical (based on any ethical theory) and fair (according to any notion of fairness) decisions if full information on all the relevant factors on which the decision is based are available at the time of decision-making. This raises two problems: (1) In settings, where we rely on AI systems that are using classifiers obtained with supervised learning, some induction/generalization is present and some relevant attributes may not be present even during learning. (2) Modeling such decisions as games reveals that any -- however ethical -- pure strategy is inevitably susceptible to exploitation. Moreover, in many games, a Nash Equilibrium can only be obtained by using mixed strategies, i.e., to achieve mathematically optimal outcomes, decisions must be randomized. In this paper, we argue that in supervised learning settings, there exist random classifiers that perform at least as well as deterministic classifiers, and may hence be the optimal choice in many circumstances. We support our theoretical results with an empirical study indicating a positive societal attitude towards randomized artificial decision-makers, and discuss some policy and implementation issues related to the use of random classifiers that relate to and are relevant for current AI policy and standardization initiatives.


Multi-Agent Advisor Q-Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the last decade, there have been significant advances in multi-agent reinforcement learning (MARL) but there are still numerous challenges, such as high sample complexity and slow convergence to stable policies, that need to be overcome before wide-spread deployment is possible. However, many real-world environments already, in practice, deploy sub-optimal or heuristic approaches for generating policies. An interesting question which arises is how to best use such approaches as advisors to help improve reinforcement learning in multi-agent domains. In this paper, we provide a principled framework for incorporating action recommendations from online sub-optimal advisors in multi-agent settings. We describe the problem of ADvising Multiple Intelligent Reinforcement Agents (ADMIRAL) in nonrestrictive general-sum stochastic game environments and present two novel Q-learning based algorithms: ADMIRAL - Decision Making (ADMIRAL-DM) and ADMIRAL - Advisor Evaluation (ADMIRAL-AE), which allow us to improve learning by appropriately incorporating advice from an advisor (ADMIRAL-DM), and evaluate the effectiveness of an advisor (ADMIRAL-AE). We analyze the algorithms theoretically and provide fixed-point guarantees regarding their learning in general-sum stochastic games. Furthermore, extensive experiments illustrate that these algorithms: can be used in a variety of environments, have performances that compare favourably to other related baselines, can scale to large state-action spaces, and are robust to poor advice from advisors.


Modelling and Optimisation of Resource Usage in an IoT Enabled Smart Campus

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

University campuses are essentially a microcosm of a city. They comprise diverse facilities such as residences, sport centres, lecture theatres, parking spaces, and public transport stops. Universities are under constant pressure to improve efficiencies while offering a better experience to various stakeholders including students, staff, and visitors. Nonetheless, anecdotal evidence indicates that campus assets are not being utilised efficiently, often due to the lack of data collection and analysis, thereby limiting the ability to make informed decisions on the allocation and management of resources. Advances in the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies that can sense and communicate data from the physical world, coupled with data analytics and Artificial intelligence (AI) that can predict usage patterns, have opened up new opportunities for organisations to lower cost and improve user experience. This thesis explores this opportunity via theory and experimentation using UNSW Sydney as a living laboratory.


Machine Learning Project Predict Will it Rain Tomorrow in Australia - Projects Based Learning

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In this project we will be working with a data set, indicating whether it rain the next day in Australia, Yes or No? This column is Yes if the rain for that day was 1mm or more. We will try to create a model that will predict using the available data. Welcome to this project on predict whether it will rain tomorrow in Australia in Apache Spark Machine Learning using Databricks platform community edition server which allows you to execute your spark code, free of cost on their server just by registering through email id. In this project, we explore Apache Spark and Machine Learning on the Databricks platform.