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How Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Business - Planet Compliance

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Just like the invention of steam power in 1780, electricity in 1870, computers in 1960, AI changes our world today. Although it has been a while since AI reached our doorstep, the potential it has to offer is huge. So how artificial intelligence is changing business today? AI is good at processing large amounts of data. For businesses, it opens new horizons for quick and well-considered decision-making, risk management, forecasting, logistics optimization, marketing personalization, etc.


Topics of interest – Humanities Seminar 2021

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Conference Table 1 – Democracy and artificial intelligence: In the last decade, politically stable countries with a long-held and firm commitment to freedom of expression have witnessed their public debates plunge into an abyss. On social network platforms, anonymous and insidious mass manipulation techniques have corrupted public opinion. Democracy has spawned its opposite, electing leaders who pit themselves against the Democratic Rule of Law. At the center of the global revolution, shady strategies implemented by ultra-complex algorithms have learned how to exploit the fears and desires of crowds and individuals to engender fanaticism and irrationality. Politics has lost connection with the knowledge of factual truth, while obscurantist leaders strive to undermine fundamental rights, science, and human dignity.


Expect an Increase in Attacks on AI Systems

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A new report from AI research firm Adversa looked at a number of measurements of the adoption of AI systems, from the number and types of research papers on the topic, to government initiatives that aim to provide policy frameworks for the technology. They found that AI is being rapidly adopted but often without the necessary defenses needed to protect AI systems from targeted attacks. So-called adversarial AI attacks include bypassing AI systems, manipulating results, and exfiltrating the data that the model is based on. These sorts of attacks are not yet numerous, but have happened, and will happen with greater frequency, says Eugene Neelou, co-founder and chief technology officer of Adversa. "Although our research corpus is mostly collected from academia, they have attack cases against AI systems such as smart devices, online services, or tech giant's APIs," he says.


The Rise Of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

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The idea of Artificial Intelligence dominating the world is a scary thought. Imagine if there were tech humans which are also known as AI's, working alongside us to help with anything we need! A future dominated by artificial intelligence isn't a far-fetched fantasy. "In 2029, a machine can pass the Turing Test, according to Ray Kurzweil." This ensures that a device would exhibit intelligent behavior comparable to, if not identical to, that of a person. Who is father of artificial intelligence?


Ethics of AI: Benefits and risks of artificial intelligence

ZDNet

In 1949, at the dawn of the computer age, the French philosopher Gabriel Marcel warned of the danger of naively applying technology to solve life's problems. Life, Marcel wrote in Being and Having, cannot be fixed the way you fix a flat tire. Any fix, any technique, is itself a product of that same problematic world, and is therefore problematic, and compromised. Marcel's admonition is often summarized in a single memorable phrase: "Life is not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be lived." Despite that warning, seventy years later, artificial intelligence is the most powerful expression yet of humans' urge to solve or improve upon human life with computers. But what are these computer systems? As Marcel would have urged, one must ask where they come from, whether they embody the very problems they would purport to solve. Ethics in AI is essentially questioning, constantly investigating, and never taking for granted the technologies that are being rapidly imposed upon human life. That questioning is made all the more urgent because of scale. AI systems are reaching tremendous size in terms of the compute power they require, and the data they consume. And their prevalence in society, both in the scale of their deployment and the level of responsibility they assume, dwarfs the presence of computing in the PC and Internet eras. At the same time, increasing scale means many aspects of the technology, especially in its deep learning form, escape the comprehension of even the most experienced practitioners. Ethical concerns range from the esoteric, such as who is the author of an AI-created work of art; to the very real and very disturbing matter of surveillance in the hands of military authorities who can use the tools with impunity to capture and kill their fellow citizens. Somewhere in the questioning is a sliver of hope that with the right guidance, AI can help solve some of the world's biggest problems. The same technology that may propel bias can reveal bias in hiring decisions. The same technology that is a power hog can potentially contribute answers to slow or even reverse global warming. The risks of AI at the present moment arguably outweigh the benefits, but the potential benefits are large and worth pursuing. As Margaret Mitchell, formerly co-lead of Ethical AI at Google, has elegantly encapsulated, the key question is, "what could AI do to bring about a better society?" Mitchell's question would be interesting on any given day, but it comes within a context that has added urgency to the discussion. Mitchell's words come from a letter she wrote and posted on Google Drive following the departure of her co-lead, Timnit Gebru, in December.


Ethics of AI: Benefits and risks of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

In 1949, at the dawn of the computer age, the French philosopher Gabriel Marcel warned of the danger of naively applying technology to solve life's problems. Life, Marcel wrote in Being and Having, cannot be fixed the way you fix a flat tire. Any fix, any technique, is itself a product of that same problematic world, and is therefore problematic, and compromised. Marcel's admonition is often summarized in a single memorable phrase: "Life is not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be lived." Despite that warning, seventy years later, artificial intelligence is the most powerful expression yet of humans' urge to solve or improve upon human life with computers. But what are these computer systems? As Marcel would have urged, one must ask where they come from, whether they embody the very problems they would purport to solve. Ethics in AI is essentially questioning, constantly investigating, and never taking for granted the technologies that are being rapidly imposed upon human life. That questioning is made all the more urgent because of scale. AI systems are reaching tremendous size in terms of the compute power they require, and the data they consume. And their prevalence in society, both in the scale of their deployment and the level of responsibility they assume, dwarfs the presence of computing in the PC and Internet eras. At the same time, increasing scale means many aspects of the technology, especially in its deep learning form, escape the comprehension of even the most experienced practitioners. Ethical concerns range from the esoteric, such as who is the author of an AI-created work of art; to the very real and very disturbing matter of surveillance in the hands of military authorities who can use the tools with impunity to capture and kill their fellow citizens. Somewhere in the questioning is a sliver of hope that with the right guidance, AI can help solve some of the world's biggest problems. The same technology that may propel bias can reveal bias in hiring decisions. The same technology that is a power hog can potentially contribute answers to slow or even reverse global warming. The risks of AI at the present moment arguably outweigh the benefits, but the potential benefits are large and worth pursuing. As Margaret Mitchell, formerly co-lead of Ethical AI at Google, has elegantly encapsulated, the key question is, "what could AI do to bring about a better society?" Mitchell's question would be interesting on any given day, but it comes within a context that has added urgency to the discussion. Mitchell's words come from a letter she wrote and posted on Google Drive following the departure of her co-lead, Timnit Gebru, in December.


Twitter Updates its Responsible Machine Learning Initiative

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Responsible Machine Learning development is essential to extract positive outcomes from various AI and Machine Learning initiatives. These initiatives empower AI engineers, data scientists and end-users to build, analyze and utilize various AI ML applications ethically. Almost every major technology innovation company evangelizes the importance of Responsible Machine Learning development is essential to extract positive outcomes from various AI and Machine Learning initiatives. One of them is Twitter. Twitter has constantly provided updates on its ongoing AI and Machine Learning projects.


Google is poisoning its reputation with AI researchers

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Google has worked for years to position itself as a responsible steward of AI. Its research lab hires respected academics, publishes groundbreaking papers, and steers the agenda at the field's biggest conferences. But now its reputation has been badly, perhaps irreversibly damaged, just as the company is struggling to put a politically palatable face on its empire of data. The company's decision to fire Timnit Gebru and Margaret Mitchell -- two of its top AI ethics researchers, who happened to be examining the downsides of technology integral to Google's search products -- has triggered waves of protest. Academics have registered their discontent in various ways.


DigiTech Insight Magazine

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The global spending on the artificial intelligence (AI) market is also estimated to reach $118.6 billion by 2025. A Business Wire research unveiled that the amount spent on cloud AI in the media and entertainment (M & E) industry is anticipated to reach $1,860.9 million by 2025 from $329 million in 2019. The worldwide AI market adoption rate is estimated to reach $118.6 billion by 2025 [source: www.statista.com] Here are some of the examples of how AI is changing the media landscape. The AI market for social media is estimated to reach 3,714.89 million at 28.77% CAGR by 2025.


A 'Glut' of Innovation Spotted in Data Science and ML Platforms

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These are heady days in data science and machine learning (DSML) according to Gartner, which identified a "glut" of innovation occurring in the market for DSML platforms. From established companies chasing AutoML or model governance to startups focusing on MLops or explainable AI, a plethora of vendors are simultaneously moving in all directions with their products as they seek to differentiate themselves amid a very diverse audience. "The DSML market is simultaneously more vibrant and messier than ever," a gaggle of Gartner analysts led by Peter Krensky wrote in the Magic Quadrant for DSML Platforms, which was published earlier this month. "The definitions and parameters of data science and data scientists continue to evolve, and the market is dramatically different from how it was in 2014, when we published the first Magic Quadrant on it." The 2021 Magic Quadrant for DSML is heavily represented by companies to the right of the axis, which anybody who's familiar with Gartner's quadrant-based assessment method knows represents the "completeness of vision."