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Learning from Mistakes -- A Framework for Neural Architecture Search

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Learning from one's mistakes is an effective human learning technique where the learners focus more on the topics where mistakes were made, so as to deepen their understanding. In this paper, we investigate if this human learning strategy can be applied in machine learning. We propose a novel machine learning method called Learning From Mistakes (LFM), wherein the learner improves its ability to learn by focusing more on the mistakes during revision. We formulate LFM as a three-stage optimization problem: 1) learner learns; 2) learner re-learns focusing on the mistakes, and; 3) learner validates its learning. We develop an efficient algorithm to solve the LFM problem. We apply the LFM framework to neural architecture search on CIFAR-10, CIFAR-100, and Imagenet. Experimental results strongly demonstrate the effectiveness of our model.


Learning from Mistakes – A Framework for Neural Architecture Search

#artificialintelligence

Learning from one's mistakes is an effective human learning technique where the learners focus more on the topics where mistakes were made, so as to deepen their understanding. In this paper, we investigate if this human learning strategy can be applied in machine learning. We propose a novel machine learning method called Learning From Mistakes (LFM), wherein the learner improves its ability to learn by focusing more on the mistakes during revision. We formulate LFM as a three-stage optimization problem: 1) learner learns; 2) learner re-learns focusing on the mistakes, and; 3) learner validates its learning. We develop an efficient algorithm to solve the LFM problem.


Deep Active Learning with a Neural Architecture Search

Neural Information Processing Systems

We consider active learning of deep neural networks. Most active learning works in this context have focused on studying effective querying mechanisms and assumed that an appropriate network architecture is a priori known for the problem at hand. We challenge this assumption and propose a novel active strategy whereby the learning algorithm searches for effective architectures on the fly, while actively learning. We apply our strategy using three known querying techniques (softmax response, MC-dropout, and coresets) and show that the proposed approach overwhelmingly outperforms active learning using fixed architectures. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


LUNAR: Cellular Automata for Drifting Data Streams

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

With the advent of huges volumes of data produced in the form of fast streams, real-time machine learning has become a challenge of relevance emerging in a plethora of real-world applications. Processing such fast streams often demands high memory and processing resources. In addition, they can be affected by non-stationary phenomena (concept drift), by which learning methods have to detect changes in the distribution of streaming data, and adapt to these evolving conditions. A lack of efficient and scalable solutions is particularly noted in real-time scenarios where computing resources are severely constrained, as it occurs in networks of small, numerous, interconnected processing units (such as the so-called Smart Dust, Utility Fog, or Swarm Robotics paradigms). In this work we propose LUNAR, a streamified version of cellular automata devised to successfully meet the aforementioned requirements. It is able to act as a real incremental learner while adapting to drifting conditions. Extensive simulations with synthetic and real data will provide evidence of its competitive behavior in terms of classification performance when compared to long-established and successful online learning methods.