Machine Learning: Overviews


Quantum Machine Learning: A look at myths, realities, and future projections

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Despite recent advances and press regarding the field, quantum computing is still veiled in mystery and myth, even within the field of data science and technology. Even those within the field of quantum computing and quantum machine learning are still learning the potential for progress and the stark limitations of current systems. However, quantum computing has arrived in its infancy, and many major companies are pouring money into related R&D efforts. D-Wave's system has been commercially available for a couple of years already (albeit at a price tag of $10 million), and other systems have been opened for research purposes and commercial partnerships with quantum machine learning companies. Quantum computing hardware theoretically can take on several different forms, each of which is suited to a different type of machine learning problem.


A Primer to Ensemble Learning – Bagging and Boosting

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Ensemble is a machine learning concept in which multiple models are trained using the same learning algorithm. Bagging is a way to decrease the variance in the prediction by generating additional data for training from dataset using combinations with repetitions to produce multi-sets of the original data. Boosting is an iterative technique which adjusts the weight of an observation based on the last classification. If an observation was classified incorrectly, it tries to increase the weight of this observation. Boosting in general builds strong predictive models.


Practical Text Classification With Python and Keras – Real Python

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Imagine you could know the mood of the people on the Internet. Maybe you are not interested in its entirety, but only if people are today happy on your favorite social media platform. After this tutorial, you'll be equipped to do this. While doing this, you will get a grasp of current advancements of (deep) neural networks and how they can be applied to text. Reading the mood from text with machine learning is called sentiment analysis, and it is one of the prominent use cases in text classification. This falls into the very active research field of natural language processing (NLP). Other common use cases of text classification include detection of spam, auto tagging of customer queries, and categorization of text into defined topics. So how can you do this? Free Bonus: 5 Thoughts On Python Mastery, a free course for Python developers that shows you the roadmap and the mindset you'll need to take your Python skills to the next level. Before we start, let's take a look at what data we have. Go ahead and download the data set from the Sentiment Labelled Sentences Data Set from the UCI Machine Learning Repository. By the way, this repository is a wonderful source for machine learning data sets when you want to try out some algorithms. This data set includes labeled reviews from IMDb, Amazon, and Yelp. Each review is marked with a score of 0 for a negative sentiment or 1 for a positive sentiment. With this data set, you are able to train a model to predict the sentiment of a sentence. Take a quick moment to think about how you would go about predicting the data.


DataCamp's Data Science And Machine Learning Programs: A Review

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One of my favorite places to learn data science is an under-the-radar educational website, DataCamp. DataCamp doesn't get nearly the attention that some of the larger, more well-funded online coding schools get, but, I often find myself on one of their tutorials whenever I'm learning something new related to statistics or machine learning. Over the past few months, I've dedicated at least a few hours a week to learning the underpinnings of automation and, where I find something interesting, to blog about my experience. Unlike almost every other school or tutorial I've encountered, DataCamp has a delightfully distinct and powerful approach to education: every single piece of instruction is paired with a simple example and interactive tutorial. There are no long lectures; there are no complicated diagrams.


Comparing Machine Learning as a Service: Amazon, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud AI, IBM Watson

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For most businesses, machine learning seems close to rocket science, appearing expensive and talent demanding. And, if you're aiming at building another Netflix recommendation system, it really is. But the trend of making everything-as-a-service has affected this sophisticated sphere, too. You can jump-start an ML initiative without much investment, which would be the right move if you are new to data science and just want to grab the low hanging fruit. One of ML's most inspiring stories is the one about a Japanese farmer who decided to sort cucumbers automatically to help his parents with this painstaking operation. Unlike the stories that abound about large enterprises, the guy had neither expertise in machine learning, nor a big budget. But he did manage to get familiar with TensorFlow and employed deep learning to recognize different classes of cucumbers. By using machine learning cloud services, you can start building your first working models, yielding valuable insights from predictions with a relatively small team. We've already discussed machine learning strategy. Now let's have a look at the best machine learning platforms on the market and consider some of the infrastructural decisions to be made.


Customer Profiling and Segmentation in Python An Overview & Demo

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While most marketing managers understand that all customers have different preferences, these differences still tend to raise quite a challenge when it comes time to develop new offers. Not every product or service that your company makes will be right for every customer, nor will every customer be equally responsive to each of your company's marketing campaigns. That's why when I prepare custom training plans, I usually recommend that my clients get familiar with how they can use customer profiling and segmentation to organize their customer base into different groups. Simply put, segmentation is a way of organizing your customer base into groups. For marketing purposes, these groups are formed on the basis of people having similar product or service preferences, although segments can be constructed on any variety of other factors.


Frequently Asked Questions about Machine Learning

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A: Our machine learning process is based on academic research and has been rigorously tested. Working with AMS as an external third party, we can handle the full end-to-end research process. We can identify the sites to mine based on our experience, mine the data, clean the data to prepare it for the machine, train the dataset to optimize the power of machine learning, and run the machine. Once the machine has been run, we take the output and our trained analysts convert it into detailed insights. We also present the findings in a rich qualitative report with quotations that bring the insights to life.


A Primer in Adversarial Machine Learning – The Next Advance in AI – Data Science Central

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Summary: What comes next after Deep Learning? How do we get to Artificial General Intelligence? Adversarial Machine Learning is an emerging space that points to that direction and shows that AGI is closer than we think. Deep Learning, Convolutional Neural Nets (CNNs) have given us dramatic improvements in image, speech, and text recognition over the last two years. They suffer from the flaw however that they can be easily fooled by the introduction of even small amounts of noise, random or intentional.


Deep Learning in Neuroradiology

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SUMMARY: Deep learning is a form of machine learning using a convolutional neural network architecture that shows tremendous promise for imaging applications. It is increasingly being adapted from its original demonstration in computer vision applications to medical imaging. Because of the high volume and wealth of multimodal imaging information acquired in typical studies, neuroradiology is poised to be an early adopter of deep learning. Compelling deep learning research applications have been demonstrated, and their use is likely to grow rapidly. This review article describes the reasons, outlines the basic methods used to train and test deep learning models, and presents a brief overview of current and potential clinical applications with an emphasis on how they are likely to change future neuroradiology practice. Facility with these methods among neuroimaging researchers and clinicians will be important to channel and harness the vast potential of this new method. Deep learning is a form of artificial intelligence, roughly modeled on the structure of neurons in the brain, which has shown tremendous promise in solving many problems in computer vision, natural language processing, and robotics.1 It has recently become the dominant form of machine learning, due to a convergence of theoretic advances, openly available computer software, and hardware with sufficient computational power. The current excitement in the field of deep learning stems from new data suggesting its excellent performance in a wide variety of tasks. One benchmark of machine learning performance is the ImageNet Challenge. In this annual competition, teams compete to classify millions of images into discrete categories (tens of different kinds of dogs, fish, cars, and so forth).


Top September Stories: Essential Math for Data Science: Why and How; Machine Learning Cheat Sheets

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Here are the most popular posts in KDnuggets in September, based on the number of unique page views (UPV), and social share counts from Facebook, Twitter, and Addthis. Most Shareable (Viral) Blogs Among the top blogs, here are the 5 blogs with the highest ratio of shares/unique views, which suggests that people who read it really liked it. You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team, by William Schmarzo What on earth is data science?, by Cassie Kozyrkov Everything You Need to Know About AutoML and Neural Architecture Search, by George Seif The Data Science of "Someone Like You" or Sentiment Analysis of Adele's Songs, by Preetish Panda How many data scientists are there and is there a shortage?, by Gregory Piatetsky Neural Networks and Deep Learning: A Textbook, by Charu Aggarwal 5 Resources to Inspire Your Next Data Science Project, by Conor Dewey Hadoop for Beginners, by Aafreen Dabhoiwala 6 Steps To Write Any Machine Learning Algorithm From Scratch: Perceptron Case Study, by John Sullivan Deep Learning for NLP: An Overview of Recent Trends, by Elvis Saravia (*) Ultimate Guide to Getting Started with TensorFlow, by Brian Zhang (*) How many data scientists are there and is there a shortage?, by Gregory Piatetsky Essential Math for Data Science: 'Why' and'How', by Tirthajyoti Sarkar Journey to Machine Learning - 100 Days of ML Code, by Avik Jain You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo Neural Networks and Deep Learning: A Textbook, by Charu Aggarwal (*) You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo How many data scientists are there and is there a shortage?, by Gregory Piatetsky You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team, by William Schmarzo What on earth is data science?, by Cassie Kozyrkov Everything You Need to Know About AutoML and Neural Architecture Search, by George Seif The Data Science of "Someone Like You" or Sentiment Analysis of Adele's Songs, by Preetish Panda You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo What on earth is data science?, by Cassie Kozyrkov