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AlphaGo Documentary (with English subtitles) (2017)

#artificialintelligence

"With more board configurations than there are atoms in the observable universe, the ancient Chinese game of'Go' has long been considered a grand challenge for artificial intelligence. On March 9, 2016, the worlds of Go and artificial intelligence collided in South Korea for an extraordinary best-of-five-game competition, coined the Google DeepMind Challenge Match. Hundreds of millions of people around the world watched as a legendary Go master took on an unproven AI challenger for the first time in history. Directed by Greg Kohs with an original score by Academy Award nominee, Hauschka, AlphaGo chronicles a journey from the halls of Cambridge, through the backstreets of Bordeaux, past the coding terminals of DeepMind in London, and, ultimately, to the seven-day tournament in Seoul. As the drama unfolds, more questions emerge: What can artificial intelligence reveal about a 3000-year-old game? What can it teach us about humanity?"


No Human Being Can Beat Google s AlphaGo, and It's a Good Thing

#artificialintelligence

South Korean Go master Lee Se-Dol recently announced his retirement from professional Go competition. He felt that no matter how hard he tries, he will never beat AI Go players like AlphaGo. It is a rather sad decision and development of his historical defeat in competition with Google DeepMind's AlphaGo. It gives the whole thing a more dramatic tone than it should be. However, the defeat of human Go players to AI is neither the end of the world for the Go game nor for the human players.


Why The Retirement Of Lee Se-Dol, Former 'Go' Champion, Is A Sign Of Things To Come

#artificialintelligence

South Korean professional Go player Lee Se-Dol after the match against Google's artificial ... [ ] intelligence program, AlphaGo on March 10, 2016 in Seoul, South Korea. In May 1997, IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer defeated the reigning world chess champion, Garry Kasparov, in an official match under tournament conditions. Fast forward to 2011, IBM extended development in machine learning, natural language processing, and information retrieval to build Watson, a system capable of defeating two highly decorated Jeopardy champions: Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings. The progress of gaming innovation in the field of artificial intelligence was swift, but it wasn't until the introduction of Google DeepMind's AlphaGo in 2016 that things started to change dramatically. The AlphaGo supercomputer tackled the notion that Go, an ancient Chinese board game invented thousands of years ago, was unsolvable due to a near limitless combination of moves that a player can execute.


Former Go champion beaten by DeepMind retires after declaring AI invincible

#artificialintelligence

The South Korean Go champion Lee Se-dol has retired from professional play, telling Yonhap news agency that his decision was motivated by the ascendancy of AI. "With the debut of AI in Go games, I've realized that I'm not at the top even if I become the number one through frantic efforts," Lee told Yonhap. "Even if I become the number one, there is an entity that cannot be defeated." For years, Go was considered beyond the reach of even the most sophisticated computer programs. The ancient board game is famously complex, with more possible configurations for pieces than atoms in the observable universe. This reputation took a knock in 2016 when the Google-owned artificial intelligence company DeepMind shocked the world by defeating Se-dol four matches to one with its AlphaGo AI system.


Former Go champion beaten by DeepMind retires after declaring AI invincible

#artificialintelligence

The South Korean Go champion Lee Se-dol has retired from professional play, telling Yonhap news agency that his decision was motivated by the ascendancy of AI. "With the debut of AI in Go games, I've realized that I'm not at the top even if I become the number one through frantic efforts," Lee told Yonhap. "Even if I become the number one, there is an entity that cannot be defeated." For years, Go was considered beyond the reach of even the most sophisticated computer programs. The ancient board game is famously complex, with more possible configurations for pieces than atoms in the observable universe. This reputation took a knock in 2016 when the Google-owned artificial intelligence company DeepMind shocked the world by defeating Se-dol four matches to one with its AlphaGo AI system.


DeepMind's newest AI learns by itself and creates its own knowledge

#artificialintelligence

A couple of month's ago Google's Artificial Intelligence (AI) group, DeepMind, unveiled the latest incarnation of its Go playing program, AlphaGo Zero, an AI so powerful that it managed to cram thousands of years of human knowledge of playing the game, before inventing better moves of its own, into just three days. Hailed as a major breakthrough in AI learning because, unlike previous versions of AlphaGo, which went on to beat the world Go champion as well as take the Go online player community to the cleaners, AlphaGo Zero mastered the ancient Chinese board game from nothing more than a clean slate, with no more help from humans than being told the rules of the game. However, and as if that wasn't already impressive enough, it took its predecessor, AlphaGo, the AI that famously beat Lee Sedol, the South Korean grandmaster, to the cleaners as well, hammering it 100 games to nil. AlphaGo Zero's ability to learn for itself, and without human input, is a milestone on the road to one day realising Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), something that the same company, DeepMind, published an architecture for last year, and it will undoubtedly help us create the next generation of more "general" AI's that can do a lot more than just thrash humans at board games. AlphaGo Zero amassed its impressive skills using a technique called Reinforcement Learning, and at the heart of the program are a group of software "neurons" that are connected together to form a digital neural network.


The future is here – AlphaZero learns chess

#artificialintelligence

About three years ago, DeepMind, a company owned by Google that specializes in AI development, turned its attention to the ancient game of Go. Go had been the one game that had eluded all computer efforts to become world class, and even up until the announcement was deemed a goal that would not be attained for another decade! This was how large the difference was. When a public challenge and match was organized against the legendary player Lee Sedol, a South Korean whose track record had him in the ranks of the greatest ever, everyone thought it would be an interesting spectacle, but a certain win by the human. The question wasn't even whether the program AlphaGo would win or lose, but how much closer it was to the Holy Grail goal. The result was a crushing 4-1 victory, and a revolution in the Go world. In spite of a ton of second-guessing by the elite, who could not accept the loss, eventually they came to terms with the reality of AlphaGo, a machine that was among the very best, albeit not unbeatable. It had lost a game after all.


AI to help, not confront humans, says AlphaGo developer Aja Huang

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AI (artificial intelligence) will not confront human beings but serve as tools at their disopal, as human brain will remain the most powerful, although some say AI machines may be able to talk with people and judge their emotions in 2045 at the earliest, according to Aja Huang, one of the key developers behind AlphaGo, an AI program developed by Google's DeepMind unit. Huang made the comments when delivering a speech at the 2017 Taiwan AI Conference hosted recently by the Institute of Information Science under Academia Sinica and Taiwan Data Science Foundation. Huang recalled that he was invited to join London-based Deep Mind Technologies in late 2012, two years after he won the gold medal at the 15th Computer Olympiad in Kanazawa in 2010. In February 2014, DeepMind was acquired by Google, allowing the AI team to enjoy sufficient advanced hardware resources such as power TPU (tensor processing unit) and enabling them to work out the world's most powerful AI program AlphaGo, which has stunned the world by beating global top Go players. In March, 2016, AlphaGo beat Lee Sedol, a South Korean professional Go player in a five-game match, marking the first time a computer Go program has beaten a 9-dan professional without handicaps.


AlphaGo retires from competitive Go after defeating world number one 3-0

@machinelearnbot

AlphaGo is going out on top. After beating Ke Jie, the world's best player of the ancient Chinese board game Go, for the third time today at the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen, Google's DeepMind unit announced that it would be the last event match the AI plays. In a statement, DeepMind co-founder and co-CEO Demis Hassabis said the reason was that this week's summit represented "the highest possible pinnacle for AlphaGo as a competitive program." AlphaGo rose to prominence a little over a year ago when it unexpectedly defeated legendary player Lee Se-dol 4-1 in a match held in Seoul. Most computer scientists expected the feat of beating a top Go player with artificial intelligence to be decades away due to the game's complexity and nuance, but with this week's comprehensive defeat of Ke Jie the matter has been settled.


AlphaGo's next move DeepMind

#artificialintelligence

We have always believed in the potential for AI to help society discover new knowledge and benefit from it, and AlphaGo has given us an early glimpse that this may indeed be possible. More than a competitor, AlphaGo has been a tool to inspire Go players to try new strategies and uncover new ideas in this 3,000 year-old game. The creative moves it played against the legendary Lee Sedol in Seoul in 2016 brought completely new knowledge to the Go world, while the unofficial online games it played under the moniker Magister (Master) earlier this year have influenced many of Go's leading professionals - including the genius Ke Jie himself. Events like this week's Pair Go, in which two of the world's top players partnered with AlphaGo, showed the great potential for people to use AI systems to generate new insights in complex fields. This week's series of thrilling games with the world's best players, in the country where Go originated, has been the highest possible pinnacle for AlphaGo as a competitive program.