Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


Ubisoft is killing online support for 15 games on September 1st

Engadget

If you have fond memories of older Ubisoft games with online components from the early 2010s, you might want to check in on them soon. That's because on September 1st 2022, Ubisoft is dropping support for online services in 15 different games including Assassin's Creed Brotherhood. In a post on Ubisoft's website, the company says it's decommissioning online services in some of its older games in order to "focus our resources on delivering great experiences for players who are playing newer or more popular titles." Depending on the title, gamers will no longer be able to access multiplayer modes or even download and install additional content (DLC). Affected games are spread across various platforms including the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC, HTC Vive, Oculus and Wii U, with notable titles including Assassin's Creed Brotherhood, the 2012 release of Assassin's Creed 3, Anno 2070 and more.


Fans are saddened over the death of Technoblade, a popular Minecraft YouTuber

NPR Technology

Technoblade was one of YouTube's most popular Minecraft video creators. Technoblade was one of YouTube's most popular Minecraft video creators. Technoblade, one of the most popular Minecraft video creators on YouTube, has died following a stage 4 cancer diagnosis, according to his family. "If I had another hundred lives, I think I would choose to be Technoblade again every single time, as those were the happiest years of my life," he wrote in a message to his community about 8 hours before he died. His father read aloud the message in a YouTube video Thursday titled "so long nerds" that has reached millions of people and hit #1 on the trending page.



La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

In 2020, OpenAI's machine learning algorithm GPT-3 blew people away when, after ingesting billions of words scraped from the internet, it began spitting out well-crafted sentences. This year, DALL-E 2, a cousin of GPT-3 trained on text and images, caused a similar stir online when it began whipping up surreal images of astronauts riding horses and, more recently, crafting weird, photorealistic faces of people that don't exist. Now, the company says its latest AI has learned to play Minecraft after watching some 70,000 hours of video showing people playing the game on YouTube. Compared to numerous prior Minecraft algorithms which operate in much simpler "sandbox" versions of the game, the new AI plays in the same environment as humans, using standard keyboard-and-mouse commands. In a blog post and preprint detailing the work, the OpenAI team say that, out of the box, the algorithm learned basic skills, like chopping down trees, making planks, and building crafting tables.


AI can now play Minecraft just as well as you - here's why that matters

#artificialintelligence

Experts at OpenAI have trained a neural network to play Minecraft to an equally high standard as human players. The neural network was trained on 70,000 hours of miscellaneous in-game footage, supplemented with a small database of videos in which contractors performed specific in-game tasks, with the keyboard and mouse inputs also recorded. After fine-tuning, OpenAI found the model was able to perform all manner of complex skills, from swimming to hunting for animals and consuming their meat. It also grasped the "pillar jump", a move whereby the player places a block of material below themselves mid-jump in order to gain elevation. Perhaps most impressive, the AI was able to craft diamond tools (requiring a long string of actions to be executed in sequence), which OpenAI described as an "unprecedented" achievement for a computer agent.


OpenAI Introduces a Neural Network That Can Play 'Minecraft'

#artificialintelligence

OpenAI has developed a neural network that can play Minecraft like humans. The Artificial Intelligence (AI) model was trained over 70,000 hours of miscellaneous in-game footage, along with a small database of videos in which specific in-game tasks were performed. Keyboard and mouse inputs are also recorded. OpenAI fine-tuned the AI, and now, it is skillful as a human-it can swim, hunt for animals, and eat. The AI can also do the pillar jump, where a player places a block of material below themselves in mid-air to gain more elevation.


Blizzard buys 'Spellbreak' studio Proletariat to speed up 'WoW' development

Engadget

The studio has another major release lined up in the form of World of Warcraft expansion Dragonflight, which is expected to arrive by the end of 2022. To help get WoW expansions out on time and ensure they meet the bar in terms of quality, Blizzard bought Spellbreak studio Proletariat to bolster its ranks of developers, as GamesBeat reports. The news comes one day after Proletariat announced it will shut down Spellbreak early next year. The free-to-play game is an intriguing take on the battle royale genre, with players using magical powers instead of guns. The game never took off, though.


AI learns how to play Minecraft by watching videos - AI News

#artificialintelligence

Open AI has trained a neural network to play Minecraft by Video PreTraining (VPT) on a massive unlabeled video dataset of human Minecraft play, while using just a small amount of labeled contractor data. With a bit of fine-tuning, the AI research and deployment company is confident that its model can learn to craft diamond tools, a task that usually takes proficient humans over 20 minutes (24,000 actions). Its model uses the native human interface of keypresses and mouse movements, making it quite general, and represents a step towards general computer-using agents. A spokesperson for the Microsoft-backed firm said: "The internet contains an enormous amount of publicly available videos that we can learn from. You can watch a person make a gorgeous presentation, a digital artist draw a beautiful sunset, and a Minecraft player build an intricate house. However, these videos only provide a record of what happened but not precisely how it was achieved, i.e. you will not know the exact sequence of mouse movements and keys pressed. "If we would like to build large-scale foundation models in these domains as we've done in language with GPT, this lack of action labels poses a new challenge not present in the language domain, where "action labels" are simply the next words in a sentence." In order to utilise the wealth of unlabeled video data available on the internet, Open AI introduces a novel, yet simple, semi-supervised imitation learning method: Video PreTraining (VPT). The team begin by gathering a small dataset from contractors where it records not only their video, but also the actions they took, which in its case are keypresses and mouse movements. With this data the company can train an inverse dynamics model (IDM), which predicts the action being taken at each step in the video. Importantly, the IDM can use past and future information to guess the action at each step. The spokesperson added: "This task is much easier and thus requires far less data than the behavioral cloning task of predicting actions given past video frames only, which requires inferring what the person wants to do and how to accomplish it.


An AI Was Trained To Play Minecraft With 70,000 Hours Of YouTube Videos

#artificialintelligence

OpenAI, the artificial intelligence research organization founded by Elon Musk, has trained an AI to play Minecraft almost as well as humans. It only took about 70,000 hours of binging YouTube videos. A blog post detailing the feat reveals that researchers used a technique called "Video PreTraining (VPT)" to train a neural network on how to play Minecraft. This involved gathering 2,000 hours of sample dataset from actual humans playing Minecraft to include not just the raw video, but also exact keypresses and mouse movements. From there, the researchers trained an inverse dynamics model (IDM) to predict the future action being taken at each step in the videos.


OpenAI's New AI Learned to Play Minecraft by Watching 70,000 Hours of YouTube

#artificialintelligence

In 2020, OpenAI's machine learning algorithm GPT-3 blew people away when, after ingesting billions of words scraped from the internet, it began spitting out well-crafted sentences. This year, DALL-E 2, a cousin of GPT-3 trained on text and images, caused a similar stir online when it began whipping up surreal images of astronauts riding horses and, more recently, crafting weird, photorealistic faces of people that don't exist. Now, the company says its latest AI has learned to play Minecraft after watching some 70,000 hours of video showing people playing the game on YouTube. Compared to numerous prior Minecraft algorithms which operate in much simpler "sandbox" versions of the game, the new AI plays in the same environment as humans, using standard keyboard-and-mouse commands. In a blog post and preprint detailing the work, the OpenAI team say that, out of the box, the algorithm learned basic skills, like chopping down trees, making planks, and building crafting tables.