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AI helps this Koda social robot dog sense human emotions

#artificialintelligence

If you can't adopt a real dog, why not opt for this robot dog from Koda that uses artificial intelligence? Man's best friend has always been the domesticated dog, but mutts around the world could end up with some serious competition in the form of Koda's AI-powered robot dog. Unlike other robot dogs on the market, the Koda artificial intelligence dog is meant to interact socially with its human owners. The robot's AI helps it sense when its owner is sad, happy or excited so it can, over time, respond in an appropriate manner to human emotions. Get the latest science stories from CNET every week.


The Different Types of AI Explained - The Data Scientist

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is not only an emerging technology but it is also highly complex. There isn't even a settled definition of AI, not least because AI is a catch-all term that encompasses various types of technology. This provides plenty of opportunity to theorise as to what the future will hold. The news is very much focused on what technology can do now, whether it is about AI beating humans in games, asking whether AI will steal our jobs, or discussing about the potential of AI to improve society. It is good to take a step back and try and look at the bigger picture of what can be achieved within the next 100 years.


AI And Creativity: Why OpenAI's Latest Model Matters

#artificialintelligence

When prompted to generate "a mural of a blue pumpkin on the side of a building," OpenAI's new deep ... [ ] learning model DALL-E produces this series of original images. OpenAI has done it again. Earlier this month, OpenAI--the research organization behind last summer's much-hyped language model GPT-3--released a new AI model named DALL-E. While it has generated less buzz than GPT-3 did, DALL-E has even more profound implications for the future of AI. In a nutshell, DALL-E takes text captions as input and produces original images as output. For instance, when fed phrases as diverse as "a pentagonal green clock," "a sphere made of fire" or "a mural of a blue pumpkin on the side of a building," DALL-E is able to generate shockingly accurate visual renderings.


This AI can explain how it solves Rubik's Cube--and that's a big deal

#artificialintelligence

However, these AI algorithms cannot explain the thought processes behind their decisions. A computer that masters protein folding and also tells researchers more about the rules of biology is much more useful than a computer that folds proteins without explanation. Therefore, AI researchers like me are now turning our efforts toward developing AI algorithms that can explain themselves in a manner that humans can understand. If we can do this, I believe that AI will be able to uncover and teach people new facts about the world that have not yet been discovered, leading to new innovations. One field of AI, called reinforcement learning, studies how computers can learn from their own experiences.


Growing up in bilingual home 'provides lasting cognitive benefits'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life – especially if exposed to two or more languages from birth. UK experts found that adults who were exposed earlier to two languages in their lives were the highest performers in cognitive tests. 'Early bilinguals' – those who learn a second language as an infant or young child – have cognitive advantages over those who learn a second language later, suggesting the earlier we're exposed to two languages, the better for our brains. In the experiments, early bilinguals were found to be quicker at shifting attention and detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). Both early and late bilinguals performed better than those people who spent their early lives in single-language homes.


Eyesight tests could predict which people with Parkinson's will develop dementia 18 months on

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Eyesight tests could be used to identify which people with Parkinson's disease are likely to suffer from cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later. UK researchers have found that people with Parkinson's who perform less well in eye tests show worse cognitive performance a year and a half later. The study is one of two by University College London (UCL) published this month looking at people with Parkinson's – the progressive nervous system disorder that causes shakiness and stiffness. The second study found structural and functional connections of brain regions become'decoupled' throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. The findings support previous evidence that vision changes precede the cognitive decline that occurs in many, but not all, people with Parkinson's.


10 Intro Books On AI To Bring You Up To Speed

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) has come a long way over the past few years in simulating human intelligence. Today, AI is the lifeblood of almost every organisation cutting across sectors including, retail, financial, healthcare, among others. Here's an updated list of 10 best intro books on artificial intelligence geared towards AI enthusiasts. About: Mathematics and statistics are the backbone of artificial intelligence. This book is perfect for understanding the basics and the mathematics behind AI.


Dreaming Is Like Taking LSD - Issue 95: Escape

Nautilus

Without a doubt, the biggest questions about dreaming are all variants on this question: Why do we dream? We began studying dreaming in the early 1990s and, between the two of us, have published over 200 scientific papers on sleep and dreams. Pulling together a variety of compelling neuroscientific ideas and state-of-the-art findings in the fields of sleep and dream research, we propose a new and innovative model of why we dream. We call this model NEXTUP. It proposes that our dreams allow us to explore the brain's neural network connections in order to understand possibilities.


Why Horror Films Are More Popular Than Ever - Issue 95: Escape

Nautilus

Horror films were wildly popular on streaming platforms over the past year, and 2020 saw the horror genre take home its largest share of the box office in modern history.1 In a year where the world was stricken by real horrors, why were many people escaping to worlds full of fictional horrors? As odd as it may sound, the fact that people were more anxious in 2020 may be one reason why horror films were so popular. A look at typical horror fans may provide some clues about the nature of this peculiar phenomenon. For example, horror fans often mention their own anxiety and how horror helps them deal with it.


CES 2021: LG's press conference featured a virtual person presenting

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Typically the presenters at a CES press conference don't get a lot of attention. Wearing a pink hooded sweatshirt with the phrase "Stay punk forever," Reah Keem was among presenters highlighting some of the offerings from LG, ranging from appliances to personal technology. LG describes her as a "virtual composer and DJ made even more human through deep learning technology." Keem was there to introduce the LG CLOi robot, which can disinfect high-traffic areas using ultraviolet light. You can watch Reah make her debut during LG's press conference Monday morning, at roughly the 22-minute mark.