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Vermont farmer returns prosthetic leg that skydiver lost during jump

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. WEST ADDISON, Vt. – A Vermont skydiver who lost his prosthetic leg during a jump has it back, thanks to a farmer who kept an eye out for it and spotted it in a soybean field. Double amputee Chris Marckres, of Hyde Park, went for a jump Saturday at Vermont Skydiving Adventures in West Addison and lost one of his prosthetic legs after leaping from the plane. "I think my adrenaline was so high and I was just so excited, I didn't realize I had lost it," Marckres told NECN and NBC10 Boston.


U.S. Marines to get "Alpha" exoskeleton for super strength

ZDNet

The Marines are about to get their hands on an impressive bit of hardware: a wearable robotic exoskeleton that gives users super strength. The company delivering the unit, a defense-focused subsidiary of Sarcos Robotics developed the exoskeleton for industrial uses, including in energy and construction. Still, in many ways this is a return to roots for Sarcos. In 2000, the company was part of a storied class of DARPA grant recipients working on powered exoskeletons for defense purposes. In many ways the XO, which conserves energy by remaining passive when not actuated, is the fulfillment of that research.


Indiana firefighters 'rescue' prosthetic leg worth $20G

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Firefighters in Indiana spent an hour searching a reservoir on Saturday to recover a valuable item for one woman – her prosthetic leg. The Indianapolis Fire Department said on Twitter that Tactical Team 7 had just finished up an hours-long training exercise in Geist Reservoir when officers with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources approached them for help. A woman in her 40s had lost her titanium/carbon fiber prosthetic leg worth $20,000 in an area of Geist Reservoir known as "Family Cove." "Without hesitation, the crew gathered their dive equipment from the rescue truck and hopped into DNR's boat," IFD Battalion Chief Rita Reith said in a news release.


Engineers reveal a prosthetic leg with a mind of its own

#artificialintelligence

For an estimated two million people in the U.S. living with limb loss, commercial-grade prosthetics can be bulky, unintuitive, and still make everyday activities, like stepping over a sleeping cat, a challenge. A team of engineers has designed a new approach to prosthetic limb movement that uses artificial intelligence to mimic the motion of the user's residual leg, making the act of walking smoother and more intuitive. What's the news -- In a study published this week in the journal Science Robotics, mechanical engineers from the University of Utah designed a way to control the movement of prosthetic limbs that allow for more natural interaction with new environments like balls bouncing into your path or stepping over rocks. Previous work with powered prosthetics relied on preprogrammed behaviors based on the movements of non-amputee individuals, but the authors write that this approach -- while effective -- limits the use of the prosthetic to pre-mapped areas and obstacles. This would work great if you were only walking to the same places every day, but it's not practical to retrain your prosthetic every time you want to go someplace new.


Tony Hudgell raises £1m walking 10km on prosthetic legs

BBC News

A five-year-old boy who had both of his legs amputated has raised more than £1m for the hospital that saved his life.


Researchers Augment Robotic Prosthetics With AI and Computer Vision – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

The AI in robotic prostheses predicts the type of terrain users will be stepping on, quantifies the uncertainties associated with that prediction, and then incorporates that uncertainty into its decision-making. Researchers at North Carolina State University have integrated computer vision and artificial intelligence into off-the-shelf robotic prosthetics to improve walking on different types of terrain. The team built a device that attaches to the prosthetic limb to track movement and recognize different terrains. The AI is able to recognize six different terrains: downstairs, upstairs, cement, grass, tile, and concrete. "Lower-limb robotic prosthetics need to execute different behaviors based on the terrain users are walking on," said Edgar Lobaton, associate professor of computer engineering at North Carolina State University.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

#artificialintelligence

But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

#artificialintelligence

But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


Researchers incorporate computer vision and uncertainty into AI for robotic prosthetics

#artificialintelligence

Researchers have developed new software that can be integrated with existing hardware to enable people using robotic prosthetics or exoskeletons to walk in a safer, more natural manner on different types of terrain. The new framework incorporates computer vision into prosthetic leg control, and includes robust artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms that allow the software to better account for uncertainty. "Lower-limb robotic prosthetics need to execute different behaviors based on the terrain users are walking on," says Edgar Lobaton, co-author of a paper on the work and an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University. "The framework we've created allows the AI in robotic prostheses to predict the type of terrain users will be stepping on, quantify the uncertainties associated with that prediction, and then incorporate that uncertainty into its decision-making." The researchers focused on distinguishing between six different terrains that require adjustments in a robotic prosthetic's behavior: tile, brick, concrete, grass, "upstairs" and "downstairs."


Chinese man makes own prosthetic limbs

Al Jazeera

Sun Jifa is a Chinese veteran who has created his own bionic arms and is now helping other amputees in his country. At age 27, Sun lost his hands in a fishing-related explosion. Unfortunately, he soon realised he could not afford the prosthetic hands recommended by the local hospital. After eight years of creating prototypes, he says he finally developed a working model that would allow him to grip, hold, and mimic other necessary movements via a system of pulleys and wires. "Up to now, my artificial limbs are beautiful and can be designed with the help of the disabled person's own motivation," Sun explains.