Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


tl;dr: this AI sums up research papers in a sentence

#artificialintelligence

TLDR generates one-sentence summaries of computer-science papers on the scientific search engine Semantic Scholar.Credit: Agnese Abrusci/Nature The creators of a scientific search engine have unveiled software that automatically generates one-sentence summaries of research papers, which they say could help scientists to skim-read papers faster. The free tool, which creates what the team calls TLDRs (the common Internet acronym for'Too long, didn't read'), was activated this week for search results at Semantic Scholar, a search engine created by the non-profit Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) in Seattle, Washington. For the moment, the software generates sentences only for the ten million computer-science papers covered by Semantic Scholar, but papers from other disciplines should be getting summaries in the next month or so, once the software has been fine-tuned, says Dan Weld, who manages the Semantic Scholar group at AI2. Preliminary testing suggests that the tool helps readers to sort through search results faster than viewing titles and abstracts, especially on mobile phones, he says. "People seem to really like it."


tl;dr: this AI sums up research papers in a sentence

Nature

TLDR generates one-sentence summaries of computer-science papers on the scientific search engine Semantic Scholar.Credit: Agnese Abrusci/Nature The creators of a scientific search engine have unveiled software that automatically generates one-sentence summaries of research papers, which they say could help scientists to skim-read papers faster. The free tool, which creates what the team call TLDRs (the common Internet acronym for'Too long, didn't read'), was activated this week for search results at Semantic Scholar, a search engine created by the non-profit Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) in Seattle, Washington. For the moment, the software generates sentences only for the ten million computer-science papers covered by Semantic Scholar, but papers from other disciplines should be getting summaries in the next month or so, once the software has been fine-tuned, says Dan Weld, who manages the Semantic Scholar group at AI2 and led the work. Preliminary testing suggests that the tool helps readers to sort through search results faster than viewing titles and abstracts, especially on mobile phones, he says. "People seem to really like it."


Apple Is Quietly Working On Its Own Search Engine To Take On Google

International Business Times

Apple may be stealthily developing its own search engine, as Google faces a lawsuit from the U.S. antitrust authorities regarding the search engine giant's agreements with companies to be the default search tool. In the newest operating system update for the iPhone, the iOS 14, Apple has started showing its own search results and direct links to websites when users search from their home screen. In its updated version, iOS 14 does not use Google for many of its search functions, as it previously used to. The search window that appears in iPhones when users swipe right now compiles Apple-generated search suggestions rather than Google results. Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Justice, in a landmark lawsuit said, Google is monopolizing the search space by entering into multi-billion dollar deals with mobile companies like Apple, Motorola, and network carriers like AT&T and Verizon, to be the default search engine on devices.


Busy Week for Google: Search Enhancements, Followed by an Antitrust Suit - AI Trends

#artificialintelligence

Google has had an eventful couple of weeks, announcing enhancements to its search and map capabilities at its virtual "Search On" event on Oct. 15, and on Oct. 20 being accused by the US Justice Department of engaging in anti-competitive practices in order to preserve its search engine business. At the Search On event, Google detailed how it has tapped AI and machine learning techniques to make improvements to Google Maps as well as Search. In an expansion of its search "busyness metrics," users will be able to see how busy locations are without identifying the specific beach, grocery store, pharmacy or other location. COVID-19 safety information will also be added to business profiles across Search and Maps, indicating whether the business is using safety precautions such as temperature checks or plexiglass shields, according to an account in VentureBeat. An improvement to the algorithm beneath the "Did you mean?" features of search, will enable more accurate and precise spelling suggestions.


The US has a good record on fighting monopolies. Now it's Google's turn

The Guardian

Sundar Pichai, chief executive of Alphabet, Google's parent company, is a mild-mannered software engineer who is not good at games of verbal fisticuffs with US politicians. He received a drubbing last month during the "big tech" congressional hearing. Pichai can, however, summon lawyers and lobbyists galore as soon as the game gets more serious, which it definitely has. The US Department of Justice (DoJ) last week launched a huge and historic antitrust case against Google, accusing the tech company of abusing its position to maintain an illegal monopoly over internet searches and search advertising. In response, Kent Walker, Google's chief lawyer, published an indignant blogpost that signalled how the firm will fight this.


A Perspective on Theoretical Computer Science in Latin America

Communications of the ACM

Theoretical computer science is everywhere, for TCS is concerned with the foundations of computing and computing is everywhere! In the last three decades, a vibrant Latin American TCS community has emerged: here, we describe and celebrate some of its many noteworthy achievements. Computer science became a distinct academic discipline in the 1950s and early 1960s. The first CS department in the U.S. was formed in 1962, and by the 1970s virtually every university in the U.S. had one. In contrast, by the late 1970s, just a handful of Latin American universities were actively conducting research in the area. Several CS departments were eventually established during the late 1980s. Often, theoreticians played a decisive role in the foundation of these departments. One key catalyst in articulating collaborations among the few but growing number of enthusiastic theoreticians who were active in the international academic arena was the foundation of regional conferences.


The DOJ Is Fighting Google on a Shifting Battlefield

WIRED

This is normally the time when we start buying candy corn for trick or treaters. But this year is horrifying no matter who comes to the door. After years of investigations, hearings, and the rattling of legal sabers, we finally have a Techlash case: United States of America, et al. v. Google LLC. As I wrote earlier in the week, the government made a direct comparison to the Microsoft case two decades earlier, where it also invoked the trust-busting Sherman Act. In that litigation, the key issue was whether or not Microsoft leveraged its market power to jam its browser down the throats of users.


Artificial intelligence and the antitrust case against Google

#artificialintelligence

Following the launch of investigations last year, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) together with attorney generals from 11 U.S. states filed a lawsuit against Google on Tuesday alleging that the company maintains monopolies in online search and advertising, and violates laws prohibiting anticompetitive business practices. It's the first antitrust lawsuit federal prosecutors filed against a tech company since the Department of Justice brought charges against Microsoft in the 1990s. "Back then, Google claimed Microsoft's practices were anticompetitive, and yet, now, Google deploys the same playbook to sustain its own monopolies," the complaint reads. "For the sake of American consumers, advertisers, and all companies now reliant on the internet economy, the time has come to stop Google's anticompetitive conduct and restore competition." Attorneys general from no Democratic states joined the suit.


Combating record unemployment with the help of strangers

MIT Technology Review

In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, Frederick Goff, SM '01, and his teammates from a machine-learning-based hedge fund decided to apply their technology to job search engines, for which there was widespread demand. In 2015, they created a new platform, Jobcase, to help people "manage their own future of work with a set of open tools." The result: a social-media platform where strangers help strangers get jobs. While Jobcase was built to be inclusive of all workers, Goff says its focus is on the 67% of people in the US without a four-year degree, who are likely to face such challenges as frequent job changes and displacement by automation. Free to all users, the site has no premium memberships or paywalls; Jobcase's revenue comes from employers who pay to list jobs and hiring events.


How AI is powering a more helpful Google - The WebShore

#artificialintelligence

When I first came across the web as a computer scientist in the mid-90s, I was struck by the sheer volume of information online, in contrast with how hard it was to find what you were looking for. It was then that I first started thinking about search, and I've been fascinated by the problem ever since. We've made tremendous progress over the past 22 years, making Google Search work better for you every day. With recent advancements in AI, we're making bigger leaps forward in improvements to Google than we've seen over the last decade, so it's even easier for you to find just what you're looking for. Today during our Search On livestream, we shared how we're bringing the most advanced AI into our products to further our mission to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.